FCCT - LightRocket

Asia-Pacific Photo-Journalism Contest

$10,500

in cash prizes

CONTEST CLOSED

Winners and Honourable Mentions from the Last Contest

Photographer of the year - Vlad Sokhin - Photo Essay: Cargo Cult
Photographer of the year - Vlad Sokhin - Photo Essay: Cargo Cult

All Past Winners and Honourable Mentions

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  • Hellen (about 38 years old), lost her leg in 2005 during a fight with her drunk husband, Alai Kawa. Alai chopped off HellenÕs right leg with a bush knife infront of their young children, who later called for help. Alai was arrested by police, however after receiving treatment, Hellen left her home out of fear that her husband might be released.  She only returned in 2010 when she found out that Alai died in prison. She now lives together with Alai's sister and they both run a small shop in Kundiawa town, Simbu Province.Hellen (about 38 years old), lost her leg in 2005 during a fight with her drunk husband, Alai Kawa. Alai chopped off HellenÕs right leg with a bush knife infront of their young children, who later called for help. Alai was arrested by police, however after receiving treatment, Hellen left her home out of fear that her husband might be released.  She only returned in 2010 when she found out that Alai died in prison. She now lives together with Alai's sister and they both run a small shop in Kundiawa town, Simbu Province.

    2012 Photographer of the Year - Photo Essay

    By Vlad Sokhin - Violence Against Women in Papua - According to the statistics, in Papua New Guinea two thirds of women are constantly exposed to domestic violence and about 50% of women become victims of sexual assaults (in Chimbu and Western Highlands provinces, 97% and 100% of women surveyed, respectively, said they had been assaulted). Often violence against women in PNG takes savage forms. Sorcery-related brutality is very common in many provinces, but mostly in rural areas of the Highlands region. In the case of an unexpected death in a village, its residents accuse a random woman of causing the death (usually a relative of the dead person) and torture her, forcing to admit that she is a witch. Many of these "punishments" result in the victim’s death. Even if the woman survives, she would be expelled from the community permanently. Despite this widespread violence, the PNG Government does not have a program to help victims of sorcery-related violence nor provides any shelter for those women.

  • Followers of John Frum Cargo cult during the everyday ceremony of American flag raising. For them an American flag is a symbol of "cargo" (coca-cola, canned fish and meat and other benefits of Western civilization). Lamakara village, Tanna island, Vanuatu.Followers of John Frum Cargo cult during the everyday ceremony of American flag raising. For them an American flag is a symbol of "cargo" (coca-cola, canned fish and meat and other benefits of Western civilization). Lamakara village, Tanna island, Vanuatu.

    2012 Photographer of the Year - Photo Essay

    By Vlad Sokhin - Cargo Cult Vanuatu - Cargo cults are religious practices of Melanesia, focused on obtaining the "cargo" (material wealth) from the Western World through magic, religious rituals and practices. Cargo cult followers believe that their ancestors destined the cargo to them, but crafty Western people unfairly took possession of it. In the first part of XX century the followers of John Frum cargo cult of Tanna island (Vanuatu) built big wooden aircrafts, landing strips and bamboo control towers, duplicating some of "white men’s rituals" in hope they would attract real airplanes with cargo to the island. Nowadays islanders still believe in a mythological man called John Frum, who appeared in Tanna in 1937. He told the natives to go back to their old traditions and start to live in "custom". In exchange for this all locals would receive "cargo". Every day in Lamakara village, followers of the cult rase an American flag, which symbolizes power and material wealth, still owned by Westerners (by the legend, John was from America and "Frum" might be a distortion of the word "from"). In anticipation of John, who according to the local myths should come back with "cargo" on 15th of February, on this day, every year, the people of Lamakara wear U.S. military uniforms that were given to them by U.S. soldiers decades before. Many of them paint the acronym "U.S.A." on their chests and backs and march with bamboo "rifles" in the U.S. Navy style.

  • Justina, 12, holds beads, which she sells to tourists at the price of 20 000 rupiahs (2 USD) each. She attends the fourth grade in a primary school and uses money for buying lollipops and chewing gums in the market.
Jiwika village, West Papua Province.Justina, 12, holds beads, which she sells to tourists at the price of 20 000 rupiahs (2 USD) each. She attends the fourth grade in a primary school and uses money for buying lollipops and chewing gums in the market.
Jiwika village, West Papua Province.

    2012 Photographer of the Year - Photo Essay

    By Vlad Sokhin - Last of the Dani - The Dani people populate the Baliem Valley in West Papua Province of Indonesia. They first came into contact with modern civilization in the beginning of the XXth century. At that time the Dani lived in the Stone Age and many had practiced cannibalism. When West Papua joined Indonesia in 1969, a policy of intensive settlement of the region by people from other parts of the country was carried out and attempts were made to force the locals to abandon their traditions and culture. With the years of flooding the region with cheap Indonesian and Chinese goods, and the introduction of the prohibition to appear in traditional clothes in official places and educational centers, less and less people keep theirs customs and traditions. Only near Wamena, the Baliem Valley's capital, there are "touristic" traditional villages, where almost all the population lives in the old Dani stile. These people stay in the Stone Age only to make money from foreigners, who pay them for taking pictures and buy handmade goods. The heads of such villages still use penis sheaths, but keep their savings in banks and maintain this lifestyle only to make money.

  • Rohingya Muslims, trying to cross the Naf river into Bangladesh to escape sectarian violence in Myanmar, look on from an intercepted boat in Teknaf on June 13, 2012.At least 50 people have died in western Myanmar's Rakhine state in more than a week of sectarian violence and revenge attacks between Buddhists and Muslim Rohingya.Rohingya Muslims, trying to cross the Naf river into Bangladesh to escape sectarian violence in Myanmar, look on from an intercepted boat in Teknaf on June 13, 2012.At least 50 people have died in western Myanmar's Rakhine state in more than a week of sectarian violence and revenge attacks between Buddhists and Muslim Rohingya.

    2012 Spot News Single Image - First Place

    By Munir uz Zaman - Rohingya Muslims, trying to cross the Naf river into Bangladesh to escape sectarian violence in Myanmar, look on from an intercepted boat in Teknaf on June 13, 2012.At least 50 people have died in western Myanmar's Rakhine state in more than a week of sectarian violence and revenge attacks between Buddhists and Muslim Rohingya.

  • Ashamoni (aged one & half years) has died with his family in a recent landslide in Chittagong Bangladesh. Every year people are killed cause of landslides.Ashamoni (aged one & half years) has died with his family in a recent landslide in Chittagong Bangladesh. Every year people are killed cause of landslides.

    2012 Spot News Single Image - Honourable Mention

    By Kauser Haider - Ashamoni (aged one & half years) has died with his family in a recent landslide in Chittagong Bangladesh. Every year people are killed cause of landslides.

  • Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi (C) waves as she crosses a crowd of supporters while arriving for a political rally as part of her electoral campaign at a stadium in Pathein, some 200 kms west of Yangon on February 7, 2012.Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi (C) waves as she crosses a crowd of supporters while arriving for a political rally as part of her electoral campaign at a stadium in Pathein, some 200 kms west of Yangon on February 7, 2012.

    2012 Spot News Single Image - Honourable Mention

    By Christophe Archambault - Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi (C) waves as she crosses a crowd of supporters while arriving for a political rally as part of her electoral campaign at a stadium in Pathein, some 200 kms west of Yangon on February 7, 2012.

  • At sea : international waters close to border with republic of the philippines exclusive economic zone (eez). Diver Joel Gonzaga of the Philippine fishing boat 'Vergene' works in and around a skipjack tuna fishing net using just a single plastic air hose connected to a rusty compressor onboard the fishing boat at surface, 12 November 2012. Perhaps the most dangerous fishing method of all, compressor diving is known in the Philippines as 'Pa-aling' diving. According to Gonzaga, who spends months at a time on board the 'Vergene', fatal injuries and deaths occur regularly. The most common cause of death from 'Pa-aling' diving is due to decompression illness, otherwise known as 'the bends'. Dangerous fishing methods such as 'Pa-aling' are a major contributor to the overfishing crisis in and around the Philippines. (Mandatory Credit Alex Hofford/Greenpeace)At sea : international waters close to border with republic of the philippines exclusive economic zone (eez). Diver Joel Gonzaga of the Philippine fishing boat 'Vergene' works in and around a skipjack tuna fishing net using just a single plastic air hose connected to a rusty compressor onboard the fishing boat at surface, 12 November 2012. Perhaps the most dangerous fishing method of all, compressor diving is known in the Philippines as 'Pa-aling' diving. According to Gonzaga, who spends months at a time on board the 'Vergene', fatal injuries and deaths occur regularly. The most common cause of death from 'Pa-aling' diving is due to decompression illness, otherwise known as 'the bends'. Dangerous fishing methods such as 'Pa-aling' are a major contributor to the overfishing crisis in and around the Philippines. (Mandatory Credit Alex Hofford/Greenpeace)

    2012 Feature Single Image - First Place

    by Alex Hofford - At sea in international waters close to the border with Republic of the Philippines exclusive economic zone (EEZ). Diver Joel Gonzaga of the Philippine fishing boat 'Vergene' works in and around a skipjack tuna fishing net using just a single plastic air hose connected to a rusty compressor onboard the fishing boat at surface, 12 November 2012. Perhaps the most dangerous fishing method of all, compressor diving is known in the Philippines as 'Pa-aling' diving. According to Gonzaga, who spends months at a time on board the 'Vergene', fatal injuries and deaths occur regularly. The most common cause of death from 'Pa-aling' diving is due to decompression illness, otherwise known as 'the bends'. Dangerous fishing methods such as 'Pa-aling' are a major contributor to the overfishing crisis in and around the Philippines.

  • A day labourer takes a drink from a bottle while working in a small plastic recycling factory in Sylhet for survival. Her job is to separate the different coloured bottles, then washing and dry them for a daily wage of about 100 to 120 taka (US $1.25 to US $1.50). She will collect any left over cooking oil to take home for her family. Nearly 60% of all villagers in Bangladesh live below the poverty level, and many come to the cities to find work.A day labourer takes a drink from a bottle while working in a small plastic recycling factory in Sylhet for survival. Her job is to separate the different coloured bottles, then washing and dry them for a daily wage of about 100 to 120 taka (US $1.25 to US $1.50). She will collect any left over cooking oil to take home for her family. Nearly 60% of all villagers in Bangladesh live below the poverty level, and many come to the cities to find work.

    2012 Feature Single Image - Honourable Mention

    By Akhlas Uddin - A day labourer takes a drink from a bottle while working in a small plastic recycling factory in Sylhet for survival. Her job is to separate the different coloured bottles, then washing and dry them for a daily wage of about 100 to 120 taka (US $1.25 to US $1.50). She will collect any left over cooking oil to take home for her family. Nearly 60% of all villagers in Bangladesh live below the poverty level, and many come to the cities to find work.

  • Ta Ju (49) walks with his wife She She (47) and three of his children to visit fellow ethnic Karen refugee friends near their home in Buffalo, New York on August 28, 2009.Ta Ju (49) walks with his wife She She (47) and three of his children to visit fellow ethnic Karen refugee friends near their home in Buffalo, New York on August 28, 2009.

    2012 Migration Issues - First Place

    By James Robert Fuller - Burma to Buffalo - Resettled to the USA - This essay is part of a long-term project about an ethnic Karen family resettled to the United States and how they learn to make a home there. US statistics show that from 2007 to the end of 2011, 83,902 refugees from Burma were resettled to the US - the largest group at over 27% of US refugee arrivals. This project documents the varied transition of identities within the family and evokes their disparate notions of “home”. It arrives at a time when, as eligible for US citizenship and with an invitation from Aung San Suu Kyi for Burmese diaspora to return, they are presented with a genuine choice of how and where to build their future.

  • This is the day when Ichiraku, 20, becomes a Geiko from a Maiko. She looks in a hand mirror to paint her lips.This is the day when Ichiraku, 20, becomes a Geiko from a Maiko. She looks in a hand mirror to paint her lips.

    2012 Photo Essay - First Place

    By Kazuhiko Matsumura - Subtle Beauty - This is a story about the lifestyle of Maikos and Geikos. In Kyoto city, there are five communities where they live. A lot of girls who aspire to become a Maiko come to these communities, but most of them leave soon, because of their strict life style. They entertain guests, mainly rich men, in the exclusive Japanese-style partys. So they have to be elegance, polite and beautiful, but entertaining, too. They live in a house with the Madam of the house. They are thoroughly trained in how to behave as a Maiko by a Madam. After several years as a Maiko, when they are over 20 years old, they become a Geiko. This means being an adult in their community. Meanwhile, not only their appearance is changing but they are becoming more mature inside. I try to shoot their true essence as well as their appearance in their white makeup. That is the subtle beauty of the Maiko and Geiko.

  • Dewi's lifeless body is carried into the fire by her uncle to be cremated.

Dewi (20) is a young wife who died from AIDS after contracting HIV from her husband.  Dewi kept her status a secret from her family.  Before her death, Dewi’s family used a traditional healing method of cutting her body to let “dirty” blood out in order to cure her illness.  Outside, men cut wood into small pieces and stacked them to prepare for her cremation.  A local NGO called Caring Hands donated money for cremation, since Dewi’s family was too poor to have her buried.  A pastor led the ceremony and prayed before Dewi’s body was place on top of the funeral pyre.  

It is common for husbands to keep their status from their wives or vice versa due to shame and fear of discrimination or punishment.  Even after testing positive for HIV, many still disregard using condoms to avoid drawing suspicion.  As a result, HIV is often passed on to their spouse.Dewi's lifeless body is carried into the fire by her uncle to be cremated.

Dewi (20) is a young wife who died from AIDS after contracting HIV from her husband.  Dewi kept her status a secret from her family.  Before her death, Dewi’s family used a traditional healing method of cutting her body to let “dirty” blood out in order to cure her illness.  Outside, men cut wood into small pieces and stacked them to prepare for her cremation.  A local NGO called Caring Hands donated money for cremation, since Dewi’s family was too poor to have her buried.  A pastor led the ceremony and prayed before Dewi’s body was place on top of the funeral pyre.  

It is common for husbands to keep their status from their wives or vice versa due to shame and fear of discrimination or punishment.  Even after testing positive for HIV, many still disregard using condoms to avoid drawing suspicion.  As a result, HIV is often passed on to their spouse.

    2012 Photo Essay - Honourable Mention

    By Andri Tambunan - Against All Odds - HIV/AIDS Epidemic Among Indigenous Papuans: The provinces of Papua and West Papua, formerly known as Irian Jaya, are located in easternmost Indonesia. They are home to only 1 percent of Indonesia's 230 million people; however, almost 40 percent of all HIV/AIDS cases in the country are located there. In the two provinces' (which I call "Papua," as is the norm in the region), HIV/AIDS infection rates are the highest in the country, and 15 times higher than the national average. The people of Papua are living and dying in the midst of the fastest growing epidemic in Asia.

  • In this composite image, a car drives past a ship called Asia Symphony that was left stranded prior to the sixth month anniversary of the March 11 earthquake and massive tsunami on September 10, 2011 in Kamaishi, Iwate Prefecture, Japan. (Top Photo) Local residents walk past the Asia Symphony, which has been left stranded after being lifted up onto the promenade of the docks March 24, 2011 in Kamaishi, Iwate Prefecture, Japan. A 9.0 magnitude strong earthquake struck Japan offshore on March 11 at 2:46pm local time, triggering a tsunami wave of up to ten metres which engulfed large parts of north-eastern Japan and also damaging the Fukushima nuclear plant, causing the worst nuclear crisis in decades. The current number of dead and missing is reportedly estimated to be 22,900. (Photo by Athit Perawongmetha/Getty Images)In this composite image, a car drives past a ship called Asia Symphony that was left stranded prior to the sixth month anniversary of the March 11 earthquake and massive tsunami on September 10, 2011 in Kamaishi, Iwate Prefecture, Japan. (Top Photo) Local residents walk past the Asia Symphony, which has been left stranded after being lifted up onto the promenade of the docks March 24, 2011 in Kamaishi, Iwate Prefecture, Japan. A 9.0 magnitude strong earthquake struck Japan offshore on March 11 at 2:46pm local time, triggering a tsunami wave of up to ten metres which engulfed large parts of north-eastern Japan and also damaging the Fukushima nuclear plant, causing the worst nuclear crisis in decades. The current number of dead and missing is reportedly estimated to be 22,900. (Photo by Athit Perawongmetha/Getty Images)

    2011 Photographer of the Year - Photo Essay

    By Athit Perawongmetha - Japan Before and After - A series of composite before and after images on the six month anniversary of the March 11 earthquake and massive tsunami.

  • A broken picture frame lies in the mud within the exclusion zone, about 12 miles (20 kilometers) away from Fukushima Nuclear Power Planton April 7, 2011 in Minamisoma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. The 9.0 magnitude strong earthquake struck offshore on March 11 at 2:46pm local time, triggering a tsunami wave of up to ten metres which engulfed large parts of north-eastern Japan, and also damaging the Fukushima nuclear plant and threatening a nuclear catastrophe. The death toll continues to rise with numbers of dead and missing exceeding 20,000 in a tragedy not seen since World War II in Japan. (Photo by Athit Perawongmetha/Getty Images)A broken picture frame lies in the mud within the exclusion zone, about 12 miles (20 kilometers) away from Fukushima Nuclear Power Planton April 7, 2011 in Minamisoma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. The 9.0 magnitude strong earthquake struck offshore on March 11 at 2:46pm local time, triggering a tsunami wave of up to ten metres which engulfed large parts of north-eastern Japan, and also damaging the Fukushima nuclear plant and threatening a nuclear catastrophe. The death toll continues to rise with numbers of dead and missing exceeding 20,000 in a tragedy not seen since World War II in Japan. (Photo by Athit Perawongmetha/Getty Images)

    2011 Photographer of the Year - Photo Essay

    By Athit Perawongmetha - Inside the Exclusion Zone - Photographs from inside the exclusion zone, about 12 miles (20 kilometers) away from Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant on April 7, 2011 in Minamisoma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. The 9.0 magnitude strong earthquake struck offshore on March 11 at 2:46pm local time, triggering a tsunami wave of up to ten metres which engulfed large parts of north-eastern Japan, and also damaging the Fukushima nuclear plant and threatening a nuclear catastrophe. The death toll continues to rise with numbers of dead and missing exceeding 20,000 in a tragedy not seen since World War II in Japan.

  • Yingluck Shinawatra raises her arm with a trademark salute, making the #1 sign of her party because they are first on the ballot sheet during a final campaign rally on July 2, 2011 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailands voting polls open on July 3, with red shirt movement supported Yingluck Shinawatra, younger sister of fugitive and former prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra who was ousted in 2006, running against Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva's Democrats. This will be Thailand's fourth election in seven years. (Photo by Athit Perawongmetha/Getty Images)Yingluck Shinawatra raises her arm with a trademark salute, making the #1 sign of her party because they are first on the ballot sheet during a final campaign rally on July 2, 2011 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailands voting polls open on July 3, with red shirt movement supported Yingluck Shinawatra, younger sister of fugitive and former prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra who was ousted in 2006, running against Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva's Democrats. This will be Thailand's fourth election in seven years. (Photo by Athit Perawongmetha/Getty Images)

    2011 Photographer of the Year - Photo Essay

    By Athit Perawongmetha - Thailand Elections - Coverage of the 2011 Thai election campaign that saw Yingluck Shinawatra take over the reins of government from Abhisit Vejjajiva.

  • Aung San Suu Kyi arrives at her National League for Democracy (NLD) headquarters on November 14, 2010 in Yangon, Burma. Myanmar's pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi had been held under house arrest for the majority of the past 15 years but has now finally been released by the country's military leaders. After the first elections in 20 years the military backed Union Solidarity and Development Party (USDP) is reported to have won the election. (Photo by Athit Perawongmetha/Getty Images)Aung San Suu Kyi arrives at her National League for Democracy (NLD) headquarters on November 14, 2010 in Yangon, Burma. Myanmar's pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi had been held under house arrest for the majority of the past 15 years but has now finally been released by the country's military leaders. After the first elections in 20 years the military backed Union Solidarity and Development Party (USDP) is reported to have won the election. (Photo by Athit Perawongmetha/Getty Images)

    2011 Photographer of the Year - Singles

    By Athit Perawongmetha - Three spot news photos and two feature images.

  • Guards try to subdue a leopard on the loose near Mahananda Wildlife Sanctuary in India’s West Bengal. According to the forest department, more than 15,000 hectares of forest land have been encroached upon in West Bengal, forcing wild animals out of their natural habitat and into areas where humans aren’t properly trained to handle them. In this case, a leopard stepped out of the jungle and into conflict with local guards, who began hurling stones in the direction of the scared animal. Later, burning tires were thrown in the animal’s direction. When nothing happened, the guards concluded that the leopard, a member of an endangered species, had died. But then it let out a roar and jumped upon the guards, who tried to subjugate the animal with brutal kukri stabs. Eventually, the leopard was captured in a net; but by then, it had almost died because of mistreatment from the guards, who were not properly trained to perform a rescue and did not tranquilize the animal properly when they had the chance.

Mandatory credit: Salil Bera/The Week/OnAsia.comGuards try to subdue a leopard on the loose near Mahananda Wildlife Sanctuary in India’s West Bengal. According to the forest department, more than 15,000 hectares of forest land have been encroached upon in West Bengal, forcing wild animals out of their natural habitat and into areas where humans aren’t properly trained to handle them. In this case, a leopard stepped out of the jungle and into conflict with local guards, who began hurling stones in the direction of the scared animal. Later, burning tires were thrown in the animal’s direction. When nothing happened, the guards concluded that the leopard, a member of an endangered species, had died. But then it let out a roar and jumped upon the guards, who tried to subjugate the animal with brutal kukri stabs. Eventually, the leopard was captured in a net; but by then, it had almost died because of mistreatment from the guards, who were not properly trained to perform a rescue and did not tranquilize the animal properly when they had the chance.

Mandatory credit: Salil Bera/The Week/OnAsia.com

    2011 Spot News Single Image - First Place

    By Salil Bera - Guards try to subdue a leopard on the loose near Mahananda Wildlife Sanctuary in India’s West Bengal. According to the forest department, more than 15,000 hectares of forest land have been encroached upon in West Bengal, forcing wild animals out of their natural habitat and into areas where humans aren’t properly trained to handle them. In this case, a leopard stepped out of the jungle and into conflict with local guards, who began hurling stones in the direction of the scared animal. Later, burning tires were thrown in the animal’s direction. When nothing happened, the guards concluded that the leopard, a member of an endangered species, had died. But then it let out a roar and jumped upon the guards, who tried to subjugate the animal with brutal kukri stabs. Eventually, the leopard was captured in a net; but by then, it had almost died because of mistreatment from the guards, who were not properly trained to perform a rescue and did not tranquillize the animal properly when they had the chance.

  • Sister of Feroz Ahmad alias Showkat wails as she clings to the bed carrying the body of her brother, killed by forces, during his funeral in Pattan some 35 kms north of Srinagar, India, Monday, Sept. 6, 2010.Sister of Feroz Ahmad alias Showkat wails as she clings to the bed carrying the body of her brother, killed by forces, during his funeral in Pattan some 35 kms north of Srinagar, India, Monday, Sept. 6, 2010.

    2011 Spot News Single Image - Honourable Mention

    By Altaf Qadri - Sister of Feroz Ahmad alias Showkat wails as she clings to the bed carrying the body of her brother, killed by forces, during his funeral in Pattan some 35 kms north of Srinagar, India, Monday, Sept. 6, 2010.

  • Two women missing legs  at the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) Orthopaedic Centre in Kabul where victims of war as well as the disabled, are fitted with artificial limbs, hand made on the compound. Picture by Graham Crouch for The Australian MagazineTwo women missing legs  at the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) Orthopaedic Centre in Kabul where victims of war as well as the disabled, are fitted with artificial limbs, hand made on the compound. Picture by Graham Crouch for The Australian Magazine

    2011 Feature Single Image - First Place

    By Graham Crouch - Two women missing legs at the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) Orthopaedic Centre in Kabul where victims of war as well as the disabled, are fitted with artificial limbs, hand made on the compound.

  • A Muslim man prays  at the ruins of Bilal Masjid, popularly known as the "Rock Mosque". Built three years ago by an Arab Sheikh, the Wahabi mosque was the largest in Upper Swat, with a capacity for 500, before the flood in 2010 swept away all but its foundation.  The arrival of Wahabism in Swat Valley has been controversial, since their hardline stance to Islam closely mirrors that of the Taliban. (Photo by Edwin Koo)A Muslim man prays  at the ruins of Bilal Masjid, popularly known as the "Rock Mosque". Built three years ago by an Arab Sheikh, the Wahabi mosque was the largest in Upper Swat, with a capacity for 500, before the flood in 2010 swept away all but its foundation.  The arrival of Wahabism in Swat Valley has been controversial, since their hardline stance to Islam closely mirrors that of the Taliban. (Photo by Edwin Koo)

    2011 Feature Single Image - Honourable Mention

    By Edwin Koo - A Muslim man prays at the ruins of Bilal Masjid, popularly known as the "Rock Mosque". Built three years ago by an Arab Sheikh, the Wahabi mosque was the largest in Upper Swat, with a capacity for 500, before the flood in 2010 swept away all but its foundation. The arrival of Wahabism in Swat Valley has been controversial, since their hard-line stance to Islam closely mirrors that of the Taliban.

  • Vehicles move past Pakistan daily workers, sleeping under a mosquito net, in the middle of a street on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Wednesday, June 8, 2011. (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen)Vehicles move past Pakistan daily workers, sleeping under a mosquito net, in the middle of a street on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Wednesday, June 8, 2011. (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen)

    2011 Feature Single Image - Honourable Mention

    By Muhammed Muheisen - Vehicles move past Pakistan daily workers, sleeping under a mosquito net, in the middle of a street on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan.

  • Actor #2 - 70 years oldActor #2 - 70 years old

    2011 Photo Essay - First Place

    By Diego Vergés Requejo - Ludruk Transvestite Theater - is originally from East Java. The shows tell stories about daily life situations of the Javanese. It is more flexible and open than other shows because the characters can address any issues they want, but the common ones are love and friendship and they are always trying to explain what it is good and what it's bad, all in a comedy style.

  • A man hangs on to what remains of a house that was built on stilts as he tries to recover belongings after a powerful Typhoon Nesat wiped out most of their neighbors' homes along a coastal village in Navotas, north of Manila, Philippines on Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011. Emergency services and residents in the Philippine capital cleaned up and restored electricity Wednesday after the powerful typhoon unleashed floodwaters and fierce wind that killed at least 20 people and sent huge waves crashing over seawalls. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)A man hangs on to what remains of a house that was built on stilts as he tries to recover belongings after a powerful Typhoon Nesat wiped out most of their neighbors' homes along a coastal village in Navotas, north of Manila, Philippines on Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011. Emergency services and residents in the Philippine capital cleaned up and restored electricity Wednesday after the powerful typhoon unleashed floodwaters and fierce wind that killed at least 20 people and sent huge waves crashing over seawalls. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

    2011 Environmental Issues - First Place

    By Aaron Favila - A man hangs on to what remains of a house that was built on stilts as he tries to recover belongings after a powerful Typhoon Nesat wiped out most of their neighbors' homes along a coastal village in Navotas, north of Manila, Philippines on Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011. Emergency services and residents in the Philippine capital cleaned up and restored electricity Wednesday after the powerful typhoon unleashed floodwaters and fierce wind that killed at least 20 people and sent huge waves crashing over seawalls.

  • A boy crossing water in an inudated road during a heavy tidal surge in Chittagong, Bangladesh. Scientist predicted that most of the coastal area of Bangladesh will be submerged under water by the year 2050. They are very concerning that it could happen before the timeline. Chittagong city experiencing heavy tidal surge these days quite often. The old part of the city Chaktai, Khatunganj, Bakolia, and Agrabad are worst effected places. Chaktai and Khatunganj are the core of business of the country is in great danger to extinct under water in recent future. The tidal surge of 8th October 2010 causes huge loss of almost every shops in Chaktai and Khatungoj, when tidal surge water entered and damages goods kept inside. Business community of Chaktai and Khatunganj fears they might have to shift their business from the area if tidal surge continue to hit their business like this.
Millions of people living in those areas now have to fight with tidal surge sometimes twice a day. Many resident of the area said they only witnessed tidal surge in 1991 when a hurricane hit the coastal area of Chittagong. But the tidal surge water of recent years rise more than that cyclone of 1991 and remains for couple of days causing great concern for the inhabitants.A boy crossing water in an inudated road during a heavy tidal surge in Chittagong, Bangladesh. Scientist predicted that most of the coastal area of Bangladesh will be submerged under water by the year 2050. They are very concerning that it could happen before the timeline. Chittagong city experiencing heavy tidal surge these days quite often. The old part of the city Chaktai, Khatunganj, Bakolia, and Agrabad are worst effected places. Chaktai and Khatunganj are the core of business of the country is in great danger to extinct under water in recent future. The tidal surge of 8th October 2010 causes huge loss of almost every shops in Chaktai and Khatungoj, when tidal surge water entered and damages goods kept inside. Business community of Chaktai and Khatunganj fears they might have to shift their business from the area if tidal surge continue to hit their business like this.
Millions of people living in those areas now have to fight with tidal surge sometimes twice a day. Many resident of the area said they only witnessed tidal surge in 1991 when a hurricane hit the coastal area of Chittagong. But the tidal surge water of recent years rise more than that cyclone of 1991 and remains for couple of days causing great concern for the inhabitants.

    2011 Environmental Issues - Honourable Mention

    By Jashim Salam - A boy crossing water in an inudated road during a heavy tidal surge in Chittagong, Bangladesh. Scientist predicted that most of the coastal area of Bangladesh will be submerged under water by the year 2050.

  • A standard assault of the coal truck: these teenagers jump onto the moving trucks, risking their life to steal a few lumps of coal for the black market. Jharkhand: a mining state of Eastern India – it is the mined coal from here that has made this Indian state world-known for being the second largest coal producer. Second only to China, India extracts from it’s soil a quantity of coal overly sufficient for its energy and transport needs; the remainder is exported worldwide.  90% of the mines, which work continuously, are open-air and most of these work upon auto-combustion which releases an incalculable amount of carbon monoxide – the  cause of global warming. Whole forests have been destroyed to make way for this brutal extraction and to satisfy the country’s ever-growing development. The concessions for coal mining are granted by the central government and managed by both state and private owned enterprises, thus creating a social and economic imbalance in the area.  Everything rotates around the mining industry which was once an agricultural area and is now fully converted to coal mining.  Many people are jobless and can not cultivate their fields because groundwater aquifers are polluted by agents deriving from coal combustion. These thousands of people, without economic opportunities, are forced to work illegally, in nonexistent safety conditions and with state police always on their backs. The dramatic increase of pollution due to this brutal coal extraction is causing the population to suffer from the most serious respiratory diseases, from lung cancer to silicosis, from many typologies of tuberculosis to obstruction of the respiratory system.  Related, as well, are severe blood diseases caused by carbon monoxide inhalation, cardiac disfunction  and a short-life expectancy (which does not exceed the 50 year mark). These diseases are destroying the future of this Indian state in the name of progress. Photo by Erik MessoriA standard assault of the coal truck: these teenagers jump onto the moving trucks, risking their life to steal a few lumps of coal for the black market. Jharkhand: a mining state of Eastern India – it is the mined coal from here that has made this Indian state world-known for being the second largest coal producer. Second only to China, India extracts from it’s soil a quantity of coal overly sufficient for its energy and transport needs; the remainder is exported worldwide.  90% of the mines, which work continuously, are open-air and most of these work upon auto-combustion which releases an incalculable amount of carbon monoxide – the  cause of global warming. Whole forests have been destroyed to make way for this brutal extraction and to satisfy the country’s ever-growing development. The concessions for coal mining are granted by the central government and managed by both state and private owned enterprises, thus creating a social and economic imbalance in the area.  Everything rotates around the mining industry which was once an agricultural area and is now fully converted to coal mining.  Many people are jobless and can not cultivate their fields because groundwater aquifers are polluted by agents deriving from coal combustion. These thousands of people, without economic opportunities, are forced to work illegally, in nonexistent safety conditions and with state police always on their backs. The dramatic increase of pollution due to this brutal coal extraction is causing the population to suffer from the most serious respiratory diseases, from lung cancer to silicosis, from many typologies of tuberculosis to obstruction of the respiratory system.  Related, as well, are severe blood diseases caused by carbon monoxide inhalation, cardiac disfunction  and a short-life expectancy (which does not exceed the 50 year mark). These diseases are destroying the future of this Indian state in the name of progress. Photo by Erik Messori

    2011 Environmental Issues - Honourable Mention

    By Erik Messori - The Real Cost of Indian Coal - Second only to China, India extracts from it's soil a quantity of coal overly sufficient for its energy and transport needs; the remainder is exported worldwide. 90% of the mines, which work continuously, are open-air and most of these work upon auto-combustion which releases an incalculable amount of carbon monoxide - the cause of global warming. Whole forests have been destroyed to make way for this brutal extraction and to satisfy the country's ever-growing development. The concessions for coal mining are granted by the central government and managed by both state and private owned enterprises, thus creating a social and economic imbalance in the area. Everything rotates around the mining industry which was once an agricultural area and is now fully converted to coal mining. Many people are jobless and can not cultivate their fields because groundwater aquifers are polluted by agents deriving from coal combustion. These thousands of people, without economic opportunities, are forced to work illegally, in nonexistent safety conditions and with state police always on their backs. The dramatic increase of pollution due to this brutal coal extraction is causing the population to suffer from the most serious respiratory diseases, from lung cancer to silicosis, from many typologies of tuberculosis to obstruction of the respiratory system.

  • Afghan National Army soldier Nor Lai ,20, recovers from shrapnel wounds to his face at the ANA Military hospital October 23, 2009 Kabul, Afghanistan. An IED hit their vehicle while the soldiers were on patrol in Kajaki district of Helmand killing one and injuring seven.
2009 was the deadliest year in terms of civilian casualties in Afghanistan ever since the start of the U.S.-led war against Taliban in the country.  This photo essay takes a look at some of the victims of war, both civilian and military who are injured from both insurgent and foreign military action. The number of Afghan civilians being killed by foreign military operations has led to mounting tension between the various foreign countries and the Afghan government. More brazen suicide attacks and IED blasts are taking place in densely populated areas to create a bigger impact as more of Afghan's war wounded hit the headlines.Afghan National Army soldier Nor Lai ,20, recovers from shrapnel wounds to his face at the ANA Military hospital October 23, 2009 Kabul, Afghanistan. An IED hit their vehicle while the soldiers were on patrol in Kajaki district of Helmand killing one and injuring seven.
2009 was the deadliest year in terms of civilian casualties in Afghanistan ever since the start of the U.S.-led war against Taliban in the country.  This photo essay takes a look at some of the victims of war, both civilian and military who are injured from both insurgent and foreign military action. The number of Afghan civilians being killed by foreign military operations has led to mounting tension between the various foreign countries and the Afghan government. More brazen suicide attacks and IED blasts are taking place in densely populated areas to create a bigger impact as more of Afghan's war wounded hit the headlines.

    2010 Photographer of the Year - Photo Essay

    By Paula Bronstein - Civilian Casualties in Afghanistan.

  • Photographer of the Year - Paula Bronstein. A former drug addict at the Nejat rehabilitation program is traumatized, going through the early stages of the detox program. This story takes an in depth look at heroin story shot in Kabul from both the addiction side to the rehabilitation and detox.
Afghanistan is the world's biggest producer of opium, the raw material of heroin, most of it grown in the southern provinces of Kandahar and Helmand, where it helps fund an increasingly vicious Taliban insurgency. The illicit industry has an estimated value of around three billion dollars a year, accounting for more than 90 per cent of the world's heroin supply. Obama's US special envoy for Pakistan and Afghanistan, Richard Holbrooke stated that the US counter-narcotics effort in Afghanistan "may be the single most ineffective program in the history of foreign policy." A US Department of State report in 2009 stated that there are an estimated two million drug users in the country with at least 50-60,000 drug addicts in Kabul alone. Heroin addicts are on the increase in Kabul as the numbers of unemployed increase and the drug continues to be readily available and extremely cheap at only one dollar a hit.Photographer of the Year - Paula Bronstein. A former drug addict at the Nejat rehabilitation program is traumatized, going through the early stages of the detox program. This story takes an in depth look at heroin story shot in Kabul from both the addiction side to the rehabilitation and detox.
Afghanistan is the world's biggest producer of opium, the raw material of heroin, most of it grown in the southern provinces of Kandahar and Helmand, where it helps fund an increasingly vicious Taliban insurgency. The illicit industry has an estimated value of around three billion dollars a year, accounting for more than 90 per cent of the world's heroin supply. Obama's US special envoy for Pakistan and Afghanistan, Richard Holbrooke stated that the US counter-narcotics effort in Afghanistan "may be the single most ineffective program in the history of foreign policy." A US Department of State report in 2009 stated that there are an estimated two million drug users in the country with at least 50-60,000 drug addicts in Kabul alone. Heroin addicts are on the increase in Kabul as the numbers of unemployed increase and the drug continues to be readily available and extremely cheap at only one dollar a hit.

    2010 Photographer of the Year - Photo Essay

    By Paula Bronstein - Heroin in Afghanistan.

  • BANGKOK, THAILAND -April 13 :  Thai military take over the streets as gun battles break out during violent protests in Bangkok April 13, 2009. Protesters swept through the streets of Thailand's capital challenging the military after a state of emergency was declared. The protesters successfully canceled the three day regional summit of Asian leaders in Pattaya, highlighting their campaignto oust Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva. The Pro-Thaksin Shinawatra ( former prime minister) supporters are calling for new elections and for the current government to step down. 
(Photo Paula Bronstein/Getty Images) BANGKOK, THAILAND -April 13 :  Thai military take over the streets as gun battles break out during violent protests in Bangkok April 13, 2009. Protesters swept through the streets of Thailand's capital challenging the military after a state of emergency was declared. The protesters successfully canceled the three day regional summit of Asian leaders in Pattaya, highlighting their campaignto oust Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva. The Pro-Thaksin Shinawatra ( former prime minister) supporters are calling for new elections and for the current government to step down. 
(Photo Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)

    2010 Photographer of the Year - Photo Essay

    By Paula Bronstein - Red Shirt Protests in Bangkok.

  • KAMPONG CHAM, CAMBODIA-JULY 30 : Cheav Chenda,36,  blind, shares a warm moment with her daughter Amra Bun,10,  at a relative's home after not seeing her for many months July 30, 2010 in Kampong Cham. Cheav Chenda was attacked with acid  in February 2008 while on a motorcycle, her daughter was in the front and her son recieved only a few scars. Her husband had left her moving to France with his French-Cambodian girlfriend, the girlfriend planned the attack ( from outside the country) in a jealous fit as Cheav's husband was visiting her. Acid is readily available, unregulated and inexpensive it is used as a weapon for settling jealous lovers quarrels, and domestic disputes, and business disputes. The acid is commonplace, sulfuric acid is used in car batteries, nitric acid in jewelry industry, and hydrochloric acid in rubber production. The number of acid attacks in the country has been growing in recent years and in the first few months of 2010, according to CASC who documented 10 attacks in the first 3 months of this year, 17 through June. A culture of impunity surrounds the crime where the majority of offenders escape trial and conviction. A large number of cases fail to be reported due to fear of retaliation or because of intimidation. Since the acid disfigures, tortures and often blinds an individual, victims often suffer from depression, loss of self esteems and suicidal tendencies. The government of Cambodia is currently taking steps to draft new legislation relating to acid violence.  Cambodian Acid Survivors Charity (CASC), an organization dedicated to the welfare of acid survivors in Cambodia, since 2006. 
(Photo by Paula Bronstein/ Getty Images)KAMPONG CHAM, CAMBODIA-JULY 30 : Cheav Chenda,36,  blind, shares a warm moment with her daughter Amra Bun,10,  at a relative's home after not seeing her for many months July 30, 2010 in Kampong Cham. Cheav Chenda was attacked with acid  in February 2008 while on a motorcycle, her daughter was in the front and her son recieved only a few scars. Her husband had left her moving to France with his French-Cambodian girlfriend, the girlfriend planned the attack ( from outside the country) in a jealous fit as Cheav's husband was visiting her. Acid is readily available, unregulated and inexpensive it is used as a weapon for settling jealous lovers quarrels, and domestic disputes, and business disputes. The acid is commonplace, sulfuric acid is used in car batteries, nitric acid in jewelry industry, and hydrochloric acid in rubber production. The number of acid attacks in the country has been growing in recent years and in the first few months of 2010, according to CASC who documented 10 attacks in the first 3 months of this year, 17 through June. A culture of impunity surrounds the crime where the majority of offenders escape trial and conviction. A large number of cases fail to be reported due to fear of retaliation or because of intimidation. Since the acid disfigures, tortures and often blinds an individual, victims often suffer from depression, loss of self esteems and suicidal tendencies. The government of Cambodia is currently taking steps to draft new legislation relating to acid violence.  Cambodian Acid Survivors Charity (CASC), an organization dedicated to the welfare of acid survivors in Cambodia, since 2006. 
(Photo by Paula Bronstein/ Getty Images)

    2010 Photographer of the Year - Singles

    By Paula Bronstein - One spot news photo and four feature images.

  • An anti-government protester 'Red Shirt' throws a tire toward a burned truck as the violence in central Bangkok continues on May 16, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. So far at least 154 have been injured and over 20 killed in the clashes as the military and the government launched an operation to disperse anti-government protesters who have closed parts of the city for two months. A state of emergency is in effect that spreads to 17 provinces in the country. The Thai army declared certain protest areas where clashes are taking place as a 'Live Fire Zone.' (Photo by Athit Perawongmetha/Getty Images)An anti-government protester 'Red Shirt' throws a tire toward a burned truck as the violence in central Bangkok continues on May 16, 2010 in Bangkok, Thailand. So far at least 154 have been injured and over 20 killed in the clashes as the military and the government launched an operation to disperse anti-government protesters who have closed parts of the city for two months. A state of emergency is in effect that spreads to 17 provinces in the country. The Thai army declared certain protest areas where clashes are taking place as a 'Live Fire Zone.' (Photo by Athit Perawongmetha/Getty Images)

    2010 Spot News Single Image - First Place

    By Athit Perawongmetha - An anti-government protester 'Red Shirt' throws a tire toward a burned truck as the violence in central Bangkok continues.

  • A municipal police officer was badly beaten by the protesters, who were trying to defend the tomb of a historical Arab cleric in North Jakarta.A municipal police officer was badly beaten by the protesters, who were trying to defend the tomb of a historical Arab cleric in North Jakarta.

    2010 Spot News Single Image - Honourable Mention

    By Septiawan - A municipal police officer was badly beaten by the protesters, who were trying to defend the tomb of a historical Arab cleric in North Jakarta.

  • Flood victims scramble for food rations as they battle the downwash from a Pakistan Army helicopter during relief operations on September 13, 2010 in the village of Goza in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. Over six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been effected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water.  (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)Flood victims scramble for food rations as they battle the downwash from a Pakistan Army helicopter during relief operations on September 13, 2010 in the village of Goza in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. Over six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been effected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water.  (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)

    2010 Spot News Single Image - Honourable Mention

    By Daniel Berehulak - Flood victims scramble for food rations as they battle the downwash from a Pakistan Army helicopter during relief operations on September 13, 2010 in the village of Goza in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. Over six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been effected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water.

  • Thousands of devotees offered their Juma prayers on the road and roof of vehicles during the Ijtema while a number of devotees are seen offering prayers from rooftops of nearby buildings.Thousands of devotees offered their Juma prayers on the road and roof of vehicles during the Ijtema while a number of devotees are seen offering prayers from rooftops of nearby buildings.

    2010 Feature Single Image - First Place

    By Probal Rashid - Thousands of devotees offered their Juma prayers on the road and roof of vehicles during the Ijtema while a number of devotees are seen offering prayers from rooftops of nearby buildings.

  • An unidentified man lies dead from what appears to be an overdose  in Aokigahara Jukai, better known as the Mt. Fuji suicide forest, which is located at the base of Japan's famed mountain west of Tokyo, Japan on Dec 1 2009.An unidentified man lies dead from what appears to be an overdose  in Aokigahara Jukai, better known as the Mt. Fuji suicide forest, which is located at the base of Japan's famed mountain west of Tokyo, Japan on Dec 1 2009.

    2010 Feature Single Image - Honourable Mention

    By Robert Gilhooly - An unidentified man lies dead from what appears to be an overdose in Aokigahara Jukai, better known as the Mt. Fuji suicide forest, which is located at the base of Japan's famed mountain west of Tokyo, Japan.

  • Single mom Abegail plays basketball with her son who has Down Syndrome disease, early in the morning after long hours of working in the red light district as a bar girl. This basketball court near their backyard serves as a safe playground for her kids.  (Photo By Jae-hyun Seok)Single mom Abegail plays basketball with her son who has Down Syndrome disease, early in the morning after long hours of working in the red light district as a bar girl. This basketball court near their backyard serves as a safe playground for her kids.  (Photo By Jae-hyun Seok)

    2010 Photo Essay - First Place

    By Jae-hyun Seok - Single Mother, Sex Worker - Abegail Delos Santos is a 21-year-old bar girl and already a mother of two. Arvy her older child who suffers from Down Syndrome became sick and was finally taken to a private hospital, but he died despite the efforts of the doctors.

  • Prostitute in a hotel room in Ikebukuro-Tokyo.Prostitute in a hotel room in Ikebukuro-Tokyo.

    2010 Photo Essay - Honourable Mention

    By Umberto Fratini - An essay on the sex industry in Japan.

  • Marriage by Force in China: Burma’s Trafficking Victims. This Burmese woman was a victim of trafficking before being freed in Jie Gao, China. She is shown with her Burmese husband, who told her that if she would get pregnant, she could forget the tragedy. Last year Chinese police freed 268 Burmese women who had been trafficked and forced into marriages with Chinese men. Human rights activists believe this is a small fraction of the victims. Seeking to escape Burma’s military regime, young women are often lured by recruiters who speak of well-paid employment in the world’s fastest-growing economy. Beijing’s “one child policy” and a long-held national preference for male heirs has resulted in a lopsided male to female ratio. The shortage of potential brides drives many lonely Chinese men to buying a foreign spouse. A Chinese buyer will typically pay between 40,000 to 50,000 yuan (USD$6,000- $7,500). The new bride is forced to do house work or farming and is watched by her husband or his family at all times. Those who have escaped, tell of rape, physical abuse and loneliness. (Photo by Katsuo Takahashi)Marriage by Force in China: Burma’s Trafficking Victims. This Burmese woman was a victim of trafficking before being freed in Jie Gao, China. She is shown with her Burmese husband, who told her that if she would get pregnant, she could forget the tragedy. Last year Chinese police freed 268 Burmese women who had been trafficked and forced into marriages with Chinese men. Human rights activists believe this is a small fraction of the victims. Seeking to escape Burma’s military regime, young women are often lured by recruiters who speak of well-paid employment in the world’s fastest-growing economy. Beijing’s “one child policy” and a long-held national preference for male heirs has resulted in a lopsided male to female ratio. The shortage of potential brides drives many lonely Chinese men to buying a foreign spouse. A Chinese buyer will typically pay between 40,000 to 50,000 yuan (USD$6,000- $7,500). The new bride is forced to do house work or farming and is watched by her husband or his family at all times. Those who have escaped, tell of rape, physical abuse and loneliness. (Photo by Katsuo Takahashi)

    2010 Human Rights - First Place

    By Katsuo Takahashi - Single image winner - Marriage by Force in China: Burma’s Trafficking Victims. This Burmese woman was a victim of trafficking before being freed in Jie Gao, China. She is shown with her Burmese husband, who told her that if she would get pregnant, she could forget the tragedy. Last year Chinese police freed 268 Burmese women who had been trafficked and forced into marriages with Chinese men. Human rights activists believe this is a small fraction of the victims. Seeking to escape Burma’s military regime, young women are often lured by recruiters who speak of well-paid employment in the world’s fastest-growing economy. Beijing’s “one child policy” and a long-held national preference for male heirs has resulted in a lopsided male to female ratio. The shortage of potential brides drives many lonely Chinese men to buying a foreign spouse. A Chinese buyer will typically pay between 40,000 to 50,000 yuan (USD$6,000- $7,500). The new bride is forced to do house work or farming and is watched by her husband or his family at all times. Those who have escaped, tell of rape, physical abuse and loneliness.

  • Mumtaz Bibi, 35, had acid thrown on her by an  “unknown criminal” about 9 years ago while she was sleeping. However, Mumtaz claims that her husband’s brother was the one who threw acid on her face. When Mumtaz was 15 years old, her father sold her for $120 to
Hafiz (her current husband) who is now 75 years old. Hafiz’s brother was always jealous of Hafiz that he had such a young wife. Since this tragedy happened, her husband threatens to kill their children if she reports the incident to the police.Mumtaz Bibi, 35, had acid thrown on her by an  “unknown criminal” about 9 years ago while she was sleeping. However, Mumtaz claims that her husband’s brother was the one who threw acid on her face. When Mumtaz was 15 years old, her father sold her for $120 to
Hafiz (her current husband) who is now 75 years old. Hafiz’s brother was always jealous of Hafiz that he had such a young wife. Since this tragedy happened, her husband threatens to kill their children if she reports the incident to the police.

    2010 Human Rights - Honourable Mention

    By Noriko Hayashi - Acid Attack in Pakistan - Mumtaz Bibi, 35, had acid thrown on her by an “unknown criminal” about 9 years ago while she was sleeping. However, Mumtaz claims that her husband’s brother was the one who threw acid on her face. When Mumtaz was 15 years old, her father sold her for $120 to Hafiz (her current husband) who is now 75 years old. Hafiz’s brother was always jealous of Hafiz that he had such a young wife. Since this tragedy happened, her husband threatens to kill their children if she reports the incident to the police.

  • Eyes burned by toxic fumesEyes burned by toxic fumes

    2010 Human Rights - Honourable Mention

    By Pierpaolo Mittica - Indonesian Sulfur Mines - Indonesian miners in the sulfur mines of Mount Ijen work in primitive conditions not seen in most places for more than a century, often wear no protection, carrying up to 100 kilos of sulfur on their shoulders, climbing steep rocky paths in extreme humidity and descending the volcano for 3 kilometers, bare foot, twice daily, choking from stinking, toxic fumes. For this shortened, blinding, gagging life in hell, they are paid 6 Euros a day. These conditions destroy their lungs, eyes and other tissues. Their life expectancy is fifty years.

  • Homeless day laborers queing outside Airin Labor Welfare Center for tickets to night shelters in the area that is now called Airin. The old name of the area untill 1966, was Kamagasaki and many people still call it like that.
Kamagasaki (釜ヶ崎?) is an old place name for a part of Nishinari-ku in Osaka, Japan. Airin-chiku (あいりん地区?) became the region's official name in May, 1966
Sections of four different towns: Nishinari-ku Taishi (西成区太子?), Haginochaya (萩之茶屋?), Sanou (山王?), North Hanazono (花園北?) and Tengachaya (天下茶屋?) are collectively known as the Kamagasaki region.
Kamagasaki as a place name existed until 1922. Kamagasaki is known as Japan's largest slum, and has the largest day laborer concentration in the entire country. 30,000 people are estimated to live in every 2,000 meter radius within this region. An accurate count of occupants has never been produced, even in the national census, due to the large population of day laborers who lack permanent addresses.Homeless day laborers queing outside Airin Labor Welfare Center for tickets to night shelters in the area that is now called Airin. The old name of the area untill 1966, was Kamagasaki and many people still call it like that.
Kamagasaki (釜ヶ崎?) is an old place name for a part of Nishinari-ku in Osaka, Japan. Airin-chiku (あいりん地区?) became the region's official name in May, 1966
Sections of four different towns: Nishinari-ku Taishi (西成区太子?), Haginochaya (萩之茶屋?), Sanou (山王?), North Hanazono (花園北?) and Tengachaya (天下茶屋?) are collectively known as the Kamagasaki region.
Kamagasaki as a place name existed until 1922. Kamagasaki is known as Japan's largest slum, and has the largest day laborer concentration in the entire country. 30,000 people are estimated to live in every 2,000 meter radius within this region. An accurate count of occupants has never been produced, even in the national census, due to the large population of day laborers who lack permanent addresses.

    2009 Photographer of the Year - Photo Essay

    By Androniki Christodoulou - Japan’s slum - Kamagasaki is known as Japan's largest slum, and has the largest day laborer concentration in the entire country. 30,000 people are estimated to live in every 2,000 meter radius within this region. An accurate count of occupants has never been produced, even in the national census, due to the large population of day laborers who lack permanent addresses.

  • KOICHI NAKAYASU (33) is buying and selling items of his collection so it also  serves like his business. Also has a part time job in a call center. Toys from Japanese anime and live action TV shows for kids (Power Rangers, 70's movies super-robot anime like Gundum), soundtrack CDs, printed matters and video games.Started collecting 8 years ago. His collection is worth the price of a decent car, about 17000 dollars. Has about 200 toys.KOICHI NAKAYASU (33) is buying and selling items of his collection so it also  serves like his business. Also has a part time job in a call center. Toys from Japanese anime and live action TV shows for kids (Power Rangers, 70's movies super-robot anime like Gundum), soundtrack CDs, printed matters and video games.Started collecting 8 years ago. His collection is worth the price of a decent car, about 17000 dollars. Has about 200 toys.

    2009 Photographer of the Year - Photo Essay

    By Androniki Christodoulou - Otaku Rooms - Since the 1970s, the “otaku” subculture has emerged with people who like reading manga, watching animation and playing video and later computer games. The once-underground culture of gigs, who enjoyed their hobbies at home and could hardly communicate with people that didn’t have similar hobbies, is now rapidly becoming mainstream. With the Akihabara area of Tokyo as its centre there are more and more places where otaku hang out, buy items for their collections, try new games, or enjoy the company of maids at maid-cafes.

  • Preparing the traditional costumes and getting dressed for the Yabusame ritual in Tado shrine.Preparing the traditional costumes and getting dressed for the Yabusame ritual in Tado shrine.

    2009 Photographer of the Year - Photo Essay

    By Androniki Christodoulou - Yabusame - The Ritual of Equestrian Archery. Yabusame is a tradition of equestrian archery that has been kept alive through the centuries by an old samurai family, the Ogasawaras. It is performed as part of festivals in several Shinto shrines around Japan. In earlier times it was kept inside palace walls to be viewed only by nobles, but now is performed in public.

  • First Place - Lino “Linus” Guardian Escandor: The lifeless body of Ian Colagong, 2 yr old boy, was retrieved from the mud near  river where their house was burried in a  mudslide yesterday morning at the mountainside of Barangay San Jose Antipolo, Rizal. Ian Colagong, together with his 6 brothers died inside their home caused mudslide at the eve of storm "Ondoy". Typhoon ondoy, brought flood in Marinkina, Taytay, Rizal, and other provinces which left 100 people dead and several houses destroyed.First Place - Lino “Linus” Guardian Escandor: The lifeless body of Ian Colagong, 2 yr old boy, was retrieved from the mud near  river where their house was burried in a  mudslide yesterday morning at the mountainside of Barangay San Jose Antipolo, Rizal. Ian Colagong, together with his 6 brothers died inside their home caused mudslide at the eve of storm "Ondoy". Typhoon ondoy, brought flood in Marinkina, Taytay, Rizal, and other provinces which left 100 people dead and several houses destroyed.

    2009 Spot News - Single Images

    First Place - Lino “Linus” Guardian Escandor - plus the second and third place winners and two honourable mentions.

  • First Place - Graham Crouch: Severely undernourished and wasting, one-year-old Neeraj Adiwasi is weighed at a feeding centre in Shivpuri, Madhya Pradesh state, in India. Despite 15 years of economic growth, the incidence of child malnutrition has barely changed – 46 per cent of children under five in India are malnourished, which is twice the rate of sub-Saharan Africa. A report released recently said that a mixture of poor governance, the caste system’s disempowerment of women and superstition are preventing children getting the nutrition they need, condemning another generation to brain damage, low earning potential and early death. Currently, about 3,000 children die every day in India as a result of malnutrition.First Place - Graham Crouch: Severely undernourished and wasting, one-year-old Neeraj Adiwasi is weighed at a feeding centre in Shivpuri, Madhya Pradesh state, in India. Despite 15 years of economic growth, the incidence of child malnutrition has barely changed – 46 per cent of children under five in India are malnourished, which is twice the rate of sub-Saharan Africa. A report released recently said that a mixture of poor governance, the caste system’s disempowerment of women and superstition are preventing children getting the nutrition they need, condemning another generation to brain damage, low earning potential and early death. Currently, about 3,000 children die every day in India as a result of malnutrition.

    2009 Feature Photography - Single Images

    First Place - Graham Crouch - plus the second and third place winners and two honourable mentions.

  • Mahout Wan, poses with his elephant Cola at an abandoned housing development in Bang Bua Thong, Thailand.Mahout Wan, poses with his elephant Cola at an abandoned housing development in Bang Bua Thong, Thailand.

    2009 Photo Essay - First Place

    By Brent Lewin - Urban Elephants - After years of unsustainable growth in Thailand in the 1990s, countless developers went bankrupt and were forced to abandon their projects. Ten years later, many of Thailand’s poorest live among the abandoned foundations of skyscrapers and suburban homes-to-be, including in the Bangkok suburb of Bang Bua Thong. Surrounded by marshland and overgrown tropical vegetation, several hundred squatters occupy the concrete foundations of two-storey townhouses. Unknown even to many of its inhabitants, five families live with 10 domesticated elephants, side-by-side with their handlers, or mahouts. Many of the elephants use the abandoned structures as a jungle gym—they clamber in and out of the many rooms, and some even climb the stairs to the second floor. The families are rice farmers from a poor province in northern Thailand who supplement their income when the rice season ends by trucking the elephants into town daily, walking them in the street to find people willing to pay to feed the elephants.

  • Standing therapy with supports helps straighten
a child's bones.
Standing therapy with supports helps straighten
a child's bones.

    2009 Photo Essay - Second Place

    By Afriadi Hikmal - Sheltered Lives - In a house in West Java, Indonesia, a group of people afflicted by cerebral palsy and other disabilities and who have known each other since childhood spend their days undergoing physical therapy and counselling. Most were sent to live here as toddlers. For many, their families have moved on, losing contact as life hands out its distractions.

  • Kishor Baba, priest at Hanuman Mandir in Gurgaon. Once a nondescript little town living in the shadow of the capital city New Delhi, Gurgaon has today turned into the realization of the new Indian middle class dream. Those who live there can afford some of the luxuries not available to the ordinary Indians, such as reliably running water and electricity, clean streets, even 24-hour security. Inside the apartment buldings that have been called Ôgated communitiesÕ they can also enjoy Indian indulgences, such as an army of maids, chauffeurs, gardeners that live in another world: the vast shantytown just across the street. The "shining India" dear to the politicians and the dark India that they would love to forget are as close as ever. Kishor Baba, priest at Hanuman Mandir in Gurgaon. Once a nondescript little town living in the shadow of the capital city New Delhi, Gurgaon has today turned into the realization of the new Indian middle class dream. Those who live there can afford some of the luxuries not available to the ordinary Indians, such as reliably running water and electricity, clean streets, even 24-hour security. Inside the apartment buldings that have been called Ôgated communitiesÕ they can also enjoy Indian indulgences, such as an army of maids, chauffeurs, gardeners that live in another world: the vast shantytown just across the street. The "shining India" dear to the politicians and the dark India that they would love to forget are as close as ever.

    2009 Photo Essay - Third Place

    By Susetta Bozzi - The Two Indias of Gurgaon - Once a nondescript little town living in the shadow of the capital city New Delhi, Gurgaon has today turned into the realization of the new Indian middle class dream. Those who live there can afford some of the luxuries not available to the ordinary Indians, such as reliably running water and electricity, clean streets, even 24-hour security. Inside the apartment buldings that have been called 'gated communities' they can also enjoy Indian indulgences, such as an army of maids, chauffeurs, gardeners that live in another world: the vast shantytown just across the street. The "shining India" dear to the politicians and the dark India that they would love to forget are as close as ever.

  • Narathiwat, Thailand April 24 2006: Ethnic tensions continue to claim lives in southern Thailand. Muslim children attend evening prayers at an Islamic school, or Pondoh, near the town of Narathiwat.Narathiwat, Thailand April 24 2006: Ethnic tensions continue to claim lives in southern Thailand. Muslim children attend evening prayers at an Islamic school, or Pondoh, near the town of Narathiwat.

    2009 Photo Essay - Honourable Mention

    By Richard Humphries - Southern Thailand - Ethnic tensions continue to claim lives in Southern Thailand. The conflict has claimed more than 3,000 lives since 2004, and yet a solution seems as far away as ever. The region is becoming increasingly militarized, with militia units armed and trained by the Thai Army, and reports of human rights abuses continue.

  • A cemetery in the heart of Pasay in Metro Manila, is the resting place for over 10,000 deceased people and some living one. Some 10 cemetery caretakers and their families live under very poor conditions. Still they feel more safe among the graves then living on the outside, since this poor neighbourhood is known for drugs and violence. They look after each other and fend of any squatters or intruders, especially males, to protect their children.  A cemetery in the heart of Pasay in Metro Manila, is the resting place for over 10,000 deceased people and some living one. Some 10 cemetery caretakers and their families live under very poor conditions. Still they feel more safe among the graves then living on the outside, since this poor neighbourhood is known for drugs and violence. They look after each other and fend of any squatters or intruders, especially males, to protect their children.

    2009 Photo Essay - Honourable Mention

    By Gerhard Jörén - Living with the Dead - This cemetery in the heart of Pasay in Manila is the resting place for over 10,000 deceased people - and some living ones. About ten cemetery caretakers and their families live in the graveyard, in terribly poor conditions. But the residents feel safer among the graves than living on the outside in a neighborhood known for drugs and violence.

  • A woman sits between carriages as a train travels to Mymensing from Dhaka in Bangladesh. Millions of residents travel from the capital city to celebrate the Muslim Eid al-Fitr holiday, and many cannot afford the ticket price.A woman sits between carriages as a train travels to Mymensing from Dhaka in Bangladesh. Millions of residents travel from the capital city to celebrate the Muslim Eid al-Fitr holiday, and many cannot afford the ticket price.

    2009 Migrants & Refugees - First Place

    By Andrew Biraj - A woman sits between carriages as a train travels to Mymensing from Dhaka in Bangladesh. Millions of residents travel from the capital city to celebrate the Muslim Eid al-Fitr holiday, and many cannot afford the ticket price.

  • Madona con Bambino, Rakhine State  2009Madona con Bambino, Rakhine State  2009

    2009 Migrants & Refugees - Second Place

    By Orit Drori - Rohingya Stateless Migrants - Finding a way to fill their stomachs at the end of the day is the principal occupation of millions of Burmese, especially the residents of Arakan State in the northwest, which includes many stateless Rohingya migrants.

  • Though imprisoned they are everywhere with us. Burma's former political prisoners from across the world demand the release of all political prisoners currently incarcerated in Burma's notorious prisons. This is U Teza. He was detained for 8 years in Insein and Thayarwaddy prisons. This image is taken from the documentary project "Even Though I'm Free I Am Not". (Image Copyright © ENIGMA IMAGES)Though imprisoned they are everywhere with us. Burma's former political prisoners from across the world demand the release of all political prisoners currently incarcerated in Burma's notorious prisons. This is U Teza. He was detained for 8 years in Insein and Thayarwaddy prisons. This image is taken from the documentary project "Even Though I'm Free I Am Not". (Image Copyright © ENIGMA IMAGES)

    2009 Migrants & Refugees - Third Place

    By James Mackay - Burmese Political Prisoners - More than 2,100 political prisoners are currently incarcerated in Burma’s notorious jails. Many others have been set free but are haunted by their experiences there. “Even Though I’m Free I Am Not” is a global documentary photography project through which former Burmese political prisoners in Southeast Asia, Australia, Japan, Europe, USA, Canada and Burma itself are photographed to raise awareness of their colleagues still in jail.

  • A Thai soldier looks over the body of a suspected militant in Thailand's Yala province, nearly 1084 km ( 672 miles) south of Bangkok on May 29, 2008. Four militants were killed after an encounter with a soldier, police said. A Thai soldier looks over the body of a suspected militant in Thailand's Yala province, nearly 1084 km ( 672 miles) south of Bangkok on May 29, 2008. Four militants were killed after an encounter with a soldier, police said.

    2008 Photo of the Year

    EDITORS NOTE - GRAPHIC CONTENT - By Surapan Boonthanom - The judges could not agree on a winner from two images taken by Surapan Boonthanom, both part of an essay on violence in southern Thailand.

  • First Place - Will Baxter: The body of a child floats in the Pyapon River (Irrawaddy Delta), Burma, Thursday, May 8, 2008. Cyclone Nargis struck the Irrawaddy Delta region of Burma on May 4th/5th, leaving a path of destruction in its wake and killing approximately 130,000 people.First Place - Will Baxter: The body of a child floats in the Pyapon River (Irrawaddy Delta), Burma, Thursday, May 8, 2008. Cyclone Nargis struck the Irrawaddy Delta region of Burma on May 4th/5th, leaving a path of destruction in its wake and killing approximately 130,000 people.

    2008 Spot News - Single Images

    First place - Will Baxter - plus the second place winner.

  • First Place - Tawatchai Pattanaporn: A pair of Muslim women on a beach watching a group of quintessentially Thai children playing in the surf. The photograph illustrates the huge cultural divide that exists in sourthern Thailand, and how Thailand’s predominantly Buddhist culture is often at odds with Muslim social rules.First Place - Tawatchai Pattanaporn: A pair of Muslim women on a beach watching a group of quintessentially Thai children playing in the surf. The photograph illustrates the huge cultural divide that exists in sourthern Thailand, and how Thailand’s predominantly Buddhist culture is often at odds with Muslim social rules.

    2008 Feature Photography - Single Images

    First place - Tawatchai Pattanaporn - plus the second and third place winners.

  • First Place - Lino Escandor: The Philippine coast guards with the support of a United States Navy vessel search the remains of passengers inside the sunken vessel Princess of the stars in waters of Romblon South of Manila. Retrieval operations have replaced search and rescue with hopes of finding any survivors dimming by day. The "Princess of the Stars" with 700 passengers and crew  set sail on the eve of typhoon "fengshen" enroute to Cebu when it sank some 1.6 kilometers from the town's shoreline. Until this day the Philippine government and the Philippine coast guard continue their effort to salvage the sunken passenger vessel.First Place - Lino Escandor: The Philippine coast guards with the support of a United States Navy vessel search the remains of passengers inside the sunken vessel Princess of the stars in waters of Romblon South of Manila. Retrieval operations have replaced search and rescue with hopes of finding any survivors dimming by day. The "Princess of the Stars" with 700 passengers and crew  set sail on the eve of typhoon "fengshen" enroute to Cebu when it sank some 1.6 kilometers from the town's shoreline. Until this day the Philippine government and the Philippine coast guard continue their effort to salvage the sunken passenger vessel.

    2008 Environmental Issues - Single Images

    First place - Lino Escandor - plus the second and third place winners.

  • A woman is helped to a local hospital after suffering injuries in a bomb blast at a morning market in southern Thailand's Yala province April 12, 2007. Eleven were injured by the blast, which was triggered by militants, police said.  A woman is helped to a local hospital after suffering injuries in a bomb blast at a morning market in southern Thailand's Yala province April 12, 2007. Eleven were injured by the blast, which was triggered by militants, police said.

    2008 Photo Essay - First Place

    EDITORS NOTE - GRAPHIC CONTENT - By Surapan Boonthanom - For much of the past several years, Islamic separatists have been waging an increasingly brutal war against hardline Thai soldiers for control of the three provinces that form Thailand’s deep south. In 2008, the death toll passed 3,000, and yet few people seemed to care.

  • Myo Myint a former Burmese soldier turned political prisoner bids farewell to his friends and comrades in Umpiem camp. He is pictured on the IOM bus that will take him to Bangkok and to the United States to be reunited with his brother and sister. June 2008.Myo Myint a former Burmese soldier turned political prisoner bids farewell to his friends and comrades in Umpiem camp. He is pictured on the IOM bus that will take him to Bangkok and to the United States to be reunited with his brother and sister. June 2008.

    2008 Photo Essay - Second Place

    By Nic Dunlop - The Story of Myo Myint - In June this year, 46-year-old Myo Myint walked through the gates of a Burmese refugee camp and travelled to Bangkok’s airport, where his first ever plane-ride took him 12,000 miles to the USA. There, on a humid Indiana evening, he embraced a brother he hadn’t seen in almost 20 years. This emotional reunion marked the final chapter in a remarkable life. For Myo Myint was no ordinary refugee. As a young man, he joined the Burmese army, which has ruled the country for almost 50 years; he witnessed atrocities committed by his comrades against his own people. Later, he became a democrat, joining the mass movement led by Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi; he was jailed and tortured. Nic Dunlop followed Myo Myint to the USA.

  • Blind and deaf children at a school in Cambodia. Aide et Action is a French NGO focused on improving education and student attendance in developing countries including India, Benini and Niger. In the case of Cambodia, the group has its work cut out:  During the past few decades of civil war, the education system was completely abandoned. Now, new school buildings and libraries are popping up across the country and educators are starting to grapple with how more specialized problems like teaching the disabled.Blind and deaf children at a school in Cambodia. Aide et Action is a French NGO focused on improving education and student attendance in developing countries including India, Benini and Niger. In the case of Cambodia, the group has its work cut out:  During the past few decades of civil war, the education system was completely abandoned. Now, new school buildings and libraries are popping up across the country and educators are starting to grapple with how more specialized problems like teaching the disabled.

    2008 Photo Essay - Third Place

    By Peter Harris - Blind and deaf children at a school in Cambodia. Aide et Action is a French NGO focused on improving education and student attendance in developing countries including India, Benini and Niger. In the case of Cambodia, the group has its work cut out: During the past few decades of civil war, the education system was completely abandoned. Now, new school buildings and libraries are popping up across the country and educators are starting to grapple with how more specialized problems like teaching the disabled.

  • Pekanbaru, Indonesia, 25/08/06
Burned forest in plantations around Riau, owned by the two giant pulp and paper producers, Asia Pacific Resources International Holdings Ltd. (APRIL) and Asia Pulp and Paper (APP). Plantations of the popular species for pulp, Acacia Mangium, are susceptible to forest fires. But the government has stipulated that it is now a crime to clear land by burning.Pekanbaru, Indonesia, 25/08/06
Burned forest in plantations around Riau, owned by the two giant pulp and paper producers, Asia Pacific Resources International Holdings Ltd. (APRIL) and Asia Pulp and Paper (APP). Plantations of the popular species for pulp, Acacia Mangium, are susceptible to forest fires. But the government has stipulated that it is now a crime to clear land by burning.

    2007 Photo of the Year

    By Vinai Dithajohn - Burned forest in plantations around Riau, owned by the two giant pulp and paper producers, Asia Pacific Resources International Holdings Ltd. (APRIL) and Asia Pulp and Paper (APP). Plantations of the popular species for pulp, Acacia Mangium, are susceptible to forest fires. But the government has stipulated that it is now a crime to clear land by burning.

  • First Place - Lino G. Escandor II: Anti-riot policemen in the Philippines stand their ground as rioters make their way into a barricade despite a water canon’s assault.First Place - Lino G. Escandor II: Anti-riot policemen in the Philippines stand their ground as rioters make their way into a barricade despite a water canon’s assault.

    2007 Spot News - Single Images

    First Place - Lino G. Escandor II - Plus the second and third place winners and an honourable mention.

  • First Place - Nguyen Viet Thanh: Vietnamese artist Dao Anh Khanh (right) dances during a show of performance art in Hanoi. Pursuing a relatively new school of art, Khanh and his fellows found it hard to set foot in the cultural life of the Southeast Asian country of 84 million people.First Place - Nguyen Viet Thanh: Vietnamese artist Dao Anh Khanh (right) dances during a show of performance art in Hanoi. Pursuing a relatively new school of art, Khanh and his fellows found it hard to set foot in the cultural life of the Southeast Asian country of 84 million people.

    2007 Feature Photography - Single Images

    First Place - Nguyen Viet Thanh - Plus the second and third place winners and an honourable mention.

  • First Place - By Matthew Duncan: Many Bangkok children beg with their mothers – or women who claim to be their mothers. A child from a poor family can be hired for $50 a month to work as a beggar.First Place - By Matthew Duncan: Many Bangkok children beg with their mothers – or women who claim to be their mothers. A child from a poor family can be hired for $50 a month to work as a beggar.

    2007 Daily Life - Single Images

    First Place - Matthew Duncan - Plus the second and third place winners and an honourable mention.

  • First Place - Matthew Duncan: In some Thai boxing matches in Mae Sot, referees call a halt only when fighters can no longer stand.First Place - Matthew Duncan: In some Thai boxing matches in Mae Sot, referees call a halt only when fighters can no longer stand.

    2007 Sports - Single Images

    First Place - Matthew Duncan - Plus the second and third place winners and an honourable mention.

  • A tribal man prays in front of the coffin of Quang Van Xom, a 108-year-old man of Thai ethnic minority group in Chieng Ha commune in Vietnam's northern province of Son La. The Thais, with a population of around 1 million people, possess a diverse culture based on their own language and are among the 54 ethnic groups in the Southeast Asian country. Chieng Ha commune residents will soon have to be relocated, giving way for the reservoir construction of the $2.3 billion Son La plant, Vietnam's biggest hydro-power project.A tribal man prays in front of the coffin of Quang Van Xom, a 108-year-old man of Thai ethnic minority group in Chieng Ha commune in Vietnam's northern province of Son La. The Thais, with a population of around 1 million people, possess a diverse culture based on their own language and are among the 54 ethnic groups in the Southeast Asian country. Chieng Ha commune residents will soon have to be relocated, giving way for the reservoir construction of the $2.3 billion Son La plant, Vietnam's biggest hydro-power project.

    2007 Photo Essay - First Place

    By Nguyen Viet Thanh - Ethnic Thai Funeral in Vietnam - The Thais, with a population of around one million people, are among the 54 ethnic groups in Vietnam. The residents of one Thai commune, Chieng Ha, will soon have to be relocated to give way for a reservoir that’s part of a $2.3 billion hydropower project called Son La. Such changes pose a challenge to their diverse and unique culture, which includes its own language and rituals, including funerals – like this one, captured in all its drama by a Vietnamese photographer.

  • Ye Yajun negotiates the uneven walkway near his old mud-brick house in Chagen Leprosy Rehabilitation Village. His right leg was amputated over 20 years ago.Ye Yajun negotiates the uneven walkway near his old mud-brick house in Chagen Leprosy Rehabilitation Village. His right leg was amputated over 20 years ago.

    2007 Photo Essay - Second Place

    By Mikel Flamm - Out of the Darkness - In China, large numbers of people with leprosy live in remote villages cut off from the outside world. Many were forced to leave their families more than 40 years ago. Mikel Flamm visited some of these villages starting in 2003 and decided to document the victims’ will, determination and ability to survive—as well as their ability to forgive, as they learn to live in peace in communities that once shut them out of society.

  • Pekanbaru, Indonesia, 25/08/06
Plantations around Riau, owned by the two giant pulp and paper producers, Asia Pacific Resources International Holdings Ltd. (APRIL) and Asia Pulp and Paper (APP). Popular species for pulp, Acacia Mangium, plantations are susceptible to forest fires. The government has stipulated that it is now a crime to clear land by burning.Pekanbaru, Indonesia, 25/08/06
Plantations around Riau, owned by the two giant pulp and paper producers, Asia Pacific Resources International Holdings Ltd. (APRIL) and Asia Pulp and Paper (APP). Popular species for pulp, Acacia Mangium, plantations are susceptible to forest fires. The government has stipulated that it is now a crime to clear land by burning.

    2007 Photo Essay - Third Place

    By Vinai Dithajohn - Indonesian Haze - Over the last several years, forest fires have ravaged many acres of Indonesia’s land, and continue to have a lasting effect on its people, especially on the islands of Borneo and Sumatra. Logging and slash and burn farming are the main suspects in the seasonal fires, but the resulting smoke is creating health problems as far as Malaysia. The first image in this series also won the Photo of the Year Prize.

  • 40 year old Ghulam Jalani, outside of his new Habitat shelter. He suffers from mental problems due in part to the October 2005 earthquake although he previously had some mental instability before. His family of four include his wife Galjana 35 and two children, 5 yr old Farzana and 10 year old  Faile. Galjana and her daughter at a relatives tent.40 year old Ghulam Jalani, outside of his new Habitat shelter. He suffers from mental problems due in part to the October 2005 earthquake although he previously had some mental instability before. His family of four include his wife Galjana 35 and two children, 5 yr old Farzana and 10 year old  Faile. Galjana and her daughter at a relatives tent.

    2007 Photo Essay - Honourable Mention

    By Mikel Flamm - Pakistan Earthquake - A devastating earthquake in Pakistan left thousands of families homeless. But it also provided an opportunity for volunteers to help them rebuild their lives, as shown in this collection of photos.


 

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