Results

  • By Jonas Gratzer - Life on a Leather Tannery in Dhaka - Hazaribagh, meaning "a thousand gardens" is quite the ironic name to be giving a town that is filled with nothing but pollution and toxic waste. Men with bare feet push rickshaws up and down the polluted streets, carrying loads of leather that has been tanned for profit. There is skin on every corner of the narrow alleys as well as hazardous chemicals and oils running through the gutters of the city. Around 90% of the factory workers in Hazaribagh won't live to the age of 50.

  • By Jonas Gratzer - Aceh 10 Years after the Tsunami - The tsunami of December 2004 was as deadly as the atomic bombs that were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki together; but at the same time paved the way for peace in Indonesia. Inspired by Swedish social democracy, Aceh is now trying to build a functional society over the rubble left by the tsunami, however, the trauma left by the wave can still be seen 10 years later in many aspects of life.

  • By Jonas Gratzer - Toxic Coal Mines of India - Jharia in India's eastern Jharkand state is literally in flames. This is due to the open cast coal mining that takes place in the area. For more than 90 years, the Jharian coal mines have been alight with coal mining villages of around seven hundred thousand people settling in. Most of the mining is done with open cast as the price to mine is relatively lower to produce the profits. However, open cast mining does have its disadvantages including the release of toxic chemicals into our atmosphere.

  • By Jonas Gratzer - The Red Brigades of Lucknow - The Red Brigade is a self-defense group that was founded in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India by Usha Vishwakarma who was a victim of an attempted rape. She decided that something must be done to protect the insecurities and sexual violence against women. Thus creating the Red Brigade Lucknow with some partners to try and make the streets a safer place for women to roam. The Red Brigade mainly train young females the art of self-defense in order to help them feel safer. They are also attempting to help younger girls who are not allowed to go to school for fear that they may be raped on their way there by providing safety patrols so that younger girls can also be educated. The organisation is now…

  • By Jonas Gratzer - Sharia Law in Aceh - In the autonomous region of Aceh, there are two types of police forces: the standard police, who persecute and investigate everything from everyday crimes to murder; and the Sharia police or Wilayatul Hisbah, who are in charge of tracking people for human sins against the Islamic religion. The punishments range from religious rehabilitation to lashings.

  • By Jonas Gratzer - Prison Fights in Thailand - Thai prisoners, many of them hardened by years of incarceration, were pitted against free foreign fighters in both Muay Thai and traditional boxing bouts. Both sides were competing for a little cash, but the Thai prisoners were also fighting for their lives, literally. Prisoners who win a championship and thereby bring glory to the prison have a realistic shot at having their sentences commuted. The organizer said this goes for any prisoner regardless of the magnitude of their crime, but he was also quick to point out that prisoners are judged from a holistic perspective that incorporates their behavior outside of the ring. That said, it doesn’t diminish the gravity of what’s at stake.

  • By Jonas Gratzer - Single Images submitted to Spot News, Features and the special category, The Environment.

  • By Ruben Salgado Escudero - Solar Portraits in Myanmar - The long term project 'Solar Portraits in Myanmar' addresses the important issue of lack of access of electricity. Out of an estimated 68,000 villages, only about 3,000 are connected to any power grid, that's 27% of the population. Solar energy is a viable and much-needed solution that has the potential to improve the lives of millions immediately. Small, inexpensive photovoltaic power (PV) systems can allow people to do more with their waking hours at no additional cost. These portraits depict the lives of inhabitants of remote areas of Myanmar who, for the first time have access to electricity through the power of solar energy. Each subject was asked how having electricity…

  • By Jonas Gratzer - Anti-government protesters armed with revolvers, pistols and assault rifles opened fire on Saturday against the government loyalist "red shirts" in the Laksi area of Bangkok. The violence was an expression of ongoing political tensions in Thailand prior to controversial polls that were due to be held the following day. Anti-government protests have been ongoing in Thailand since October 2013, aiming to remove the influence of former prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra from the Thai political system. The protests were sparked off by an Amnesty Bill that would forgive Abhisit Vejjajiva and Suthep Thaugsuba for murder crimes and Thaksin Shinawatra for corruption. The bill would have allowed for Thaksin to walk right…

  • By Probal Rashid - Electricians are working on a wire above the ground without any safety measures in Dhaka, Bangladesh on 14 May 2014. All linemen, especially those who deal with live electrical apparatus should use personal protective equipment as protection against inadvertent contact. Most of the times in Bangladesh electricians work without any safety measures like rubber gloves, rubber sleeves, bucket liners and protective blankets etc. According to the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies (BILS), 7,199 workers were killed and 17,138 were injured in workplace accident and violence in the last 10 years. Between January and December 2013, at least 1,912 workers were killed and 5,738 were injured.

  • By Anik Rahman - Death Surge - Bangladesh is a river irrigated country. There are around 300 rivers in Bangladesh, consists of 24,140 km waterways. For this reason river transportation is used more than road or rail transportation.

  • By Paula Bronstein - At the Baw Du Pha IDP camp Mosboba Hatu age 60, is held by her daughter Roshida,35. According to the family, Mosboba Hatu has not eaten solid food in a few weeks, she is only taking in fluids. Her daughter says she has TB but there has been no final tests done to prove her illness. The family claims that they don't have the money to travel to the clinic to have the proper medical tests done. Health care continues to be an ongoing problem for the Rohingya as most can only get just basic treatment, for many their illness gets worse and in some cases become serious.

  • By Danilo O. Victoriano Jr. - Lake Mapanuefe used to be an active community in Barangay Aglao, San Marcelino Zambales. But after Mt. Pinatubo eruption on June 1991, the subsequent rains brought down lahar that dumped volcanic debris on the river and blocked major drainages of the mountain and eventually dammed the Mapanuepe River. The depleting forest cover due to illegal mining and charcoal-making aggravated the flooding that submerged the community leaving only the remains of church tower structure with a huge metal cross as landmark of the vanished community. Some people continue their religious practice praying for Divine intervention to resurrect their submerged houses and livelihood.

  • By Narendra Shrestha/EPA - A Nepalese pupil hugs a tree while celebrating World Environment Day at the forest of Gokarna, on the outskirt of capital Kathmandu, Nepal. 05 June 2014. A total of 2,001 people, including school children and representatives of various organization, hugged trees for about two minutes with the message to 'Save Environment–Save Trees' and to attempt to keep a Guinness World record. Nepal has an area of 147 181 km2, of which the forest area covers 37% of the total area.

  • By Scott Barbour/Getty Images - Rafael Nadal of Spain plays a forehand in his quarterfinal match against Grigor Dimitrov of Bulgaria during day 10 of the 2014 Australian Open at Melbourne Park on January 22, 2014 in Melbourne, Australia.

  • By Dennis Sabangan - Newly born Filipino baby during a Photo-therapy session at Eastern Visayas Regional Medical Center which was damaged by the 2013 Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban City, Leyte province, Philippines, 06 November 2014. Super Typhoon Haiyan, one of the world's strongest cyclones, slammed into the eastern and central Philippines on November 8, 2013 killing more than 7,300 people and displacing over 4 million. One year after the disaster, survivors are still struggling with emotional distress even as the physical rebuilding progresses.

  • By Arturo Rodriguez - Face Oblivion - The challenge is to take photographs of all ethnic groups which form Myanmar, formerly Burma.

  • By Minzayar Oo - Jade Mining in Myanmar - Myanmar's secretive jade mines lie in the Kachin town of Hpakant which is located in the northern part of the country. Everyday in Hpakant, hundreds of thousands of young men who originally came from different towns of Myanmar with a dream to find wealth, swarm across mountains of rubble dumped by the mining companies. Mining jade with an iron rod by one's own hand is a perilous job especially when banks and slag heaps are destabilized by monsoon rain. Landslides routinely swallow 10 or 20 men at a time.

  • By Vlad Sokhin - Violence Against Women in Papua - According to the statistics, in Papua New Guinea two thirds of women are constantly exposed to domestic violence and about 50% of women become victims of sexual assaults (in Chimbu and Western Highlands provinces, 97% and 100% of women surveyed, respectively, said they had been assaulted). Often violence against women in PNG takes savage forms. Sorcery-related brutality is very common in many provinces, but mostly in rural areas of the Highlands region. In the case of an unexpected death in a village, its residents accuse a random woman of causing the death (usually a relative of the dead person) and torture her, forcing to admit that she is a witch. Many of these "punishments" result…

  • By Vlad Sokhin - Cargo Cult Vanuatu - Cargo cults are religious practices of Melanesia, focused on obtaining the "cargo" (material wealth) from the Western World through magic, religious rituals and practices. Cargo cult followers believe that their ancestors destined the cargo to them, but crafty Western people unfairly took possession of it. In the first part of XX century the followers of John Frum cargo cult of Tanna island (Vanuatu) built big wooden aircrafts, landing strips and bamboo control towers, duplicating some of "white men’s rituals" in hope they would attract real airplanes with cargo to the island. Nowadays islanders still believe in a mythological man called John Frum, who appeared in Tanna in 1937. He told…

  • By Vlad Sokhin - Last of the Dani - The Dani people populate the Baliem Valley in West Papua Province of Indonesia. They first came into contact with modern civilization in the beginning of the XXth century. At that time the Dani lived in the Stone Age and many had practiced cannibalism. When West Papua joined Indonesia in 1969, a policy of intensive settlement of the region by people from other parts of the country was carried out and attempts were made to force the locals to abandon their traditions and culture. With the years of flooding the region with cheap Indonesian and Chinese goods, and the introduction of the prohibition to appear in traditional clothes in official places and educational centers, less and less people keep theirs customs…

  • By Munir uz Zaman - Rohingya Muslims, trying to cross the Naf river into Bangladesh to escape sectarian violence in Myanmar, look on from an intercepted boat in Teknaf on June 13, 2012.At least 50 people have died in western Myanmar's Rakhine state in more than a week of sectarian violence and revenge attacks between Buddhists and Muslim Rohingya.

  • By Christophe Archambault - Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi (C) waves as she crosses a crowd of supporters while arriving for a political rally as part of her electoral campaign at a stadium in Pathein, some 200 kms west of Yangon on February 7, 2012.

  • By Kauser Haider - Ashamoni (aged one & half years) has died with his family in a recent landslide in Chittagong Bangladesh. Every year people are killed cause of landslides.

  • by Alex Hofford - At sea in international waters close to the border with Republic of the Philippines exclusive economic zone (EEZ). Diver Joel Gonzaga of the Philippine fishing boat 'Vergene' works in and around a skipjack tuna fishing net using just a single plastic air hose connected to a rusty compressor onboard the fishing boat at surface, 12 November 2012. Perhaps the most dangerous fishing method of all, compressor diving is known in the Philippines as 'Pa-aling' diving. According to Gonzaga, who spends months at a time on board the 'Vergene', fatal injuries and deaths occur regularly. The most common cause of death from 'Pa-aling' diving is due to decompression illness, otherwise known as 'the…

  • By Akhlas Uddin - A day labourer takes a drink from a bottle while working in a small plastic recycling factory in Sylhet for survival. Her job is to separate the different coloured bottles, then washing and dry them for a daily wage of about 100 to 120 taka (US $1.25 to US $1.50). She will collect any left over cooking oil to take home for her family. Nearly 60% of all villagers in Bangladesh live below the poverty level, and many come to the cities to find work.

  • By James Robert Fuller - Burma to Buffalo - Resettled to the USA - This essay is part of a long-term project about an ethnic Karen family resettled to the United States and how they learn to make a home there. US statistics show that from 2007 to the end of 2011, 83,902 refugees from Burma were resettled to the US - the largest group at over 27% of US refugee arrivals. This project documents the varied transition of identities within the family and evokes their disparate notions of “home”. It arrives at a time when, as eligible for US citizenship and with an invitation from Aung San Suu Kyi for Burmese diaspora to return, they are presented with a genuine choice of how and where to build their future.

  • By Kazuhiko Matsumura - Subtle Beauty - This is a story about the lifestyle of Maikos and Geikos. In Kyoto city, there are five communities where they live. A lot of girls who aspire to become a Maiko come to these communities, but most of them leave soon, because of their strict life style. They entertain guests, mainly rich men, in the exclusive Japanese-style partys. So they have to be elegance, polite and beautiful, but entertaining, too. They live in a house with the Madam of the house. They are thoroughly trained in how to behave as a Maiko by a Madam. After several years as a Maiko, when they are over 20 years old, they become a Geiko. This means being an adult in their community. Meanwhile, not only their appearance is changing but…

  • By Andri Tambunan - Against All Odds - HIV/AIDS Epidemic Among Indigenous Papuans: The provinces of Papua and West Papua, formerly known as Irian Jaya, are located in easternmost Indonesia. They are home to only 1 percent of Indonesia's 230 million people; however, almost 40 percent of all HIV/AIDS cases in the country are located there. In the two provinces' (which I call "Papua," as is the norm in the region), HIV/AIDS infection rates are the highest in the country, and 15 times higher than the national average. The people of Papua are living and dying in the midst of the fastest growing epidemic in Asia.

  • By Athit Perawongmetha - Japan Before and After - A series of composite before and after images on the six month anniversary of the March 11 earthquake and massive tsunami.

  • By Athit Perawongmetha - Inside the Exclusion Zone - Photographs from inside the exclusion zone, about 12 miles (20 kilometers) away from Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant on April 7, 2011 in Minamisoma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. The 9.0 magnitude strong earthquake struck offshore on March 11 at 2:46pm local time, triggering a tsunami wave of up to ten metres which engulfed large parts of north-eastern Japan, and also damaging the Fukushima nuclear plant and threatening a nuclear catastrophe. The death toll continues to rise with numbers of dead and missing exceeding 20,000 in a tragedy not seen since World War II in Japan.

  • By Athit Perawongmetha - Thailand Elections - Coverage of the 2011 Thai election campaign that saw Yingluck Shinawatra take over the reins of government from Abhisit Vejjajiva.

  • By Athit Perawongmetha - Three spot news photos and two feature images.

  • By Salil Bera - Guards try to subdue a leopard on the loose near Mahananda Wildlife Sanctuary in India’s West Bengal. According to the forest department, more than 15,000 hectares of forest land have been encroached upon in West Bengal, forcing wild animals out of their natural habitat and into areas where humans aren’t properly trained to handle them. In this case, a leopard stepped out of the jungle and into conflict with local guards, who began hurling stones in the direction of the scared animal. Later, burning tires were thrown in the animal’s direction. When nothing happened, the guards concluded that the leopard, a member of an endangered species, had died. But then it let out a roar and jumped upon the guards, who tried to subjugate…

  • By Altaf Qadri - Sister of Feroz Ahmad alias Showkat wails as she clings to the bed carrying the body of her brother, killed by forces, during his funeral in Pattan some 35 kms north of Srinagar, India, Monday, Sept. 6, 2010.

  • By Graham Crouch - Two women missing legs at the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) Orthopaedic Centre in Kabul where victims of war as well as the disabled, are fitted with artificial limbs, hand made on the compound.

  • By Muhammed Muheisen - Vehicles move past Pakistan daily workers, sleeping under a mosquito net, in the middle of a street on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan.

  • By Edwin Koo - A Muslim man prays at the ruins of Bilal Masjid, popularly known as the "Rock Mosque". Built three years ago by an Arab Sheikh, the Wahabi mosque was the largest in Upper Swat, with a capacity for 500, before the flood in 2010 swept away all but its foundation. The arrival of Wahabism in Swat Valley has been controversial, since their hard-line stance to Islam closely mirrors that of the Taliban.

  • By Aaron Favila - A man hangs on to what remains of a house that was built on stilts as he tries to recover belongings after a powerful Typhoon Nesat wiped out most of their neighbors' homes along a coastal village in Navotas, north of Manila, Philippines on Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011. Emergency services and residents in the Philippine capital cleaned up and restored electricity Wednesday after the powerful typhoon unleashed floodwaters and fierce wind that killed at least 20 people and sent huge waves crashing over seawalls.

  • By Jashim Salam - A boy crossing water in an inudated road during a heavy tidal surge in Chittagong, Bangladesh. Scientist predicted that most of the coastal area of Bangladesh will be submerged under water by the year 2050.

  • By Erik Messori - The Real Cost of Indian Coal - Second only to China, India extracts from it's soil a quantity of coal overly sufficient for its energy and transport needs; the remainder is exported worldwide. 90% of the mines, which work continuously, are open-air and most of these work upon auto-combustion which releases an incalculable amount of carbon monoxide - the cause of global warming. Whole forests have been destroyed to make way for this brutal extraction and to satisfy the country's ever-growing development. The concessions for coal mining are granted by the central government and managed by both state and private owned enterprises, thus creating a social and economic imbalance in the area. Everything rotates around the…

  • By Diego Vergés Requejo - Ludruk Transvestite Theater - is originally from East Java. The shows tell stories about daily life situations of the Javanese. It is more flexible and open than other shows because the characters can address any issues they want, but the common ones are love and friendship and they are always trying to explain what it is good and what it's bad, all in a comedy style.

  • By Paula Bronstein - Civilian Casualties in Afghanistan.

  • By Paula Bronstein - Heroin in Afghanistan.

  • By Paula Bronstein - Red Shirt Protests in Bangkok.

  • By Paula Bronstein - One spot news photo and four feature images.

  • By Athit Perawongmetha - An anti-government protester 'Red Shirt' throws a tire toward a burned truck as the violence in central Bangkok continues.

  • By Septiawan - A municipal police officer was badly beaten by the protesters, who were trying to defend the tomb of a historical Arab cleric in North Jakarta.

  • By Daniel Berehulak - Flood victims scramble for food rations as they battle the downwash from a Pakistan Army helicopter during relief operations on September 13, 2010 in the village of Goza in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. Over six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been effected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster…

  • By Probal Rashid - Thousands of devotees offered their Juma prayers on the road and roof of vehicles during the Ijtema while a number of devotees are seen offering prayers from rooftops of nearby buildings.