THE FORGOTTEN FRONTLINE: AFGHAN WOMEN

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  • In Herat, A mother mourns the death of her 18 year-old daughter, who committed suicide by self-immolation with burns over 65% of her body. November, 2006

In Herat, A mother mourns the death of her 18 year-old daughter, who committed suicide by self-immolation with burns over 65% of her body. November, 2006
  • Masooma,18, has severe burns on 70% of her body from self-immolation. Forced marriages, domestic violence, poverty and lack of access to education are the main reasons for women attempting suicide. October 22, 2004

Masooma,18, has severe burns on 70% of her body from self-immolation. Forced marriages, domestic violence, poverty and lack of access to education are the main reasons for women attempting suicide. October 22, 2004
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      Herat, Afghanistan - 21/10/2004: Masooma,18, has severe burns on 70% of her body from self-immolation. Forced marriages, domestic violence, poverty and lack of access to education are the main reasons for women attempting suicide. October 22, 2004
      Credit: Getty Images
  • Jamalo,14, sits in her wheelchair outside the International Red Cross Orthopedic (ICRC) rehabilitation center in Kabul. Jamalo is now a paraplegic, crippled after her home became a battlefield. She was inside her home during the attack when a rocket hit, killing 4 family members including her sister. 

November 21, 2009Jamalo,14, sits in her wheelchair outside the International Red Cross Orthopedic (ICRC) rehabilitation center in Kabul. Jamalo is now a paraplegic, crippled after her home became a battlefield. She was inside her home during the attack when a rocket hit, killing 4 family members including her sister. 

November 21, 2009
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      Kabul, Afghanistan - 23/11/2009: Jamalo,14, sits in her wheelchair outside the International Red Cross Orthopedic (ICRC) rehabilitation center in Kabul. Jamalo is now a paraplegic, crippled after her home became a battlefield. She was inside her home during the attack when a rocket hit, killing 4 family members including her sister. November 21, 2009
      Credit: Getty Images
  • A struggle for Human rights-Afghan Women:
Afghan women maintain a classic subordinate position in a world where conservative Islamic traditions dictate what a female is allowed to do in a male dominated world. More than 87 percent of Afghan women suffer from domestic abuse according to the UN, and between 60 and 80 per cent of marriages are forced, women also deal with incredible hardships due to war, poverty and tribalism. For women, the dangers of the war go far beyond the violence of combat.  In situations of armed conflict, women suffer some of the greatest health and social inequities especially in Afghanistan where a women who is handicapped is of no use to her husband anymore if she cannot bare children or deal with her expected family duties. 
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 23: Bibi Adela, age15, from Khost gets her wound treated on her amputated leg at the International Red Cross Orthopedic (ICRC) rehabilitation center November 23, 2009 Kabul, Afghanistan. Bibi Adela lost her leg below the knee from a rocket attack 5 months ago that killed her sister and brother, injuring her mother as well. A recent U.N. report has described 2009 as the deadliest year in terms of civilian casualties in Afghanistan  since the start of the U.S.-led war against Taliban in the country.  (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)A struggle for Human rights-Afghan Women:
Afghan women maintain a classic subordinate position in a world where conservative Islamic traditions dictate what a female is allowed to do in a male dominated world. More than 87 percent of Afghan women suffer from domestic abuse according to the UN, and between 60 and 80 per cent of marriages are forced, women also deal with incredible hardships due to war, poverty and tribalism. For women, the dangers of the war go far beyond the violence of combat.  In situations of armed conflict, women suffer some of the greatest health and social inequities especially in Afghanistan where a women who is handicapped is of no use to her husband anymore if she cannot bare children or deal with her expected family duties. 
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 23: Bibi Adela, age15, from Khost gets her wound treated on her amputated leg at the International Red Cross Orthopedic (ICRC) rehabilitation center November 23, 2009 Kabul, Afghanistan. Bibi Adela lost her leg below the knee from a rocket attack 5 months ago that killed her sister and brother, injuring her mother as well. A recent U.N. report has described 2009 as the deadliest year in terms of civilian casualties in Afghanistan  since the start of the U.S.-led war against Taliban in the country.  (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
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      Kabul, Afghanistan - 23/11/2009: A struggle for Human rights-Afghan Women: Afghan women maintain a classic subordinate position in a world where conservative Islamic traditions dictate what a female is allowed to do in a male dominated world. More than 87 percent of Afghan women suffer from domestic abuse according to the UN, and between 60 and 80 per cent of marriages are forced, women also deal with incredible hardships due to war, poverty and tribalism. For women, the dangers of the war go far beyond the violence of combat. In situations of armed conflict, women suffer some of the greatest health and social inequities especially in Afghanistan where a women who is handicapped is of no use to her husband anymore if she cannot bare children or deal with her expected family duties. KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 23: Bibi Adela, age15, from Khost gets her wound treated on her amputated leg at the International Red Cross Orthopedic (ICRC) rehabilitation center November 23, 2009 Kabul, Afghanistan. Bibi Adela lost her leg below the knee from a rocket attack 5 months ago that killed her sister and brother, injuring her mother as well. A recent U.N. report has described 2009 as the deadliest year in terms of civilian casualties in Afghanistan since the start of the U.S.-led war against Taliban in the country. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
      Credit: Getty Images
  • FAIZABAD, AFGHANISTAN -JUNE 2 : Bibi Saiba, 25, suffers through hours of prolonged labor pains with her mother Bibi Jan (L) at her side  at the Badakhshan Provincial hospital June 2, 2011, in Faizabad, Badakshan. Bibi Saiba was told that she would have to get  cesarean section operation because the heart rate of the baby was too high, three hours later her husband arrived to give permission. Crises put pregnant women at greater risk due to sudden loss of medical support, trauma, malnutrition, disease and exposure to violence. According to UNICEF,  52 babies out of every 1,000 die within two weeks of birth and 134 die before their first birthday. While 1 in 8 women in Afghanistan die during pregnancy or childbirth making it the worst place in the world to be a mother. Many mothers are having children too young along with diet, and extreme poverty they face huge challenges having a healthy pregnancy.  Afghan women also deal with vitamin D deficiency from staying indoors and being covered up. In the rural parts of the country, in remote areas Afghan women deliver with no skilled help because women cannot leave home without a male and there aren't enough midwives to help every mother in need given Afghanistan's poor infrastructure.
(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)FAIZABAD, AFGHANISTAN -JUNE 2 : Bibi Saiba, 25, suffers through hours of prolonged labor pains with her mother Bibi Jan (L) at her side  at the Badakhshan Provincial hospital June 2, 2011, in Faizabad, Badakshan. Bibi Saiba was told that she would have to get  cesarean section operation because the heart rate of the baby was too high, three hours later her husband arrived to give permission. Crises put pregnant women at greater risk due to sudden loss of medical support, trauma, malnutrition, disease and exposure to violence. According to UNICEF,  52 babies out of every 1,000 die within two weeks of birth and 134 die before their first birthday. While 1 in 8 women in Afghanistan die during pregnancy or childbirth making it the worst place in the world to be a mother. Many mothers are having children too young along with diet, and extreme poverty they face huge challenges having a healthy pregnancy.  Afghan women also deal with vitamin D deficiency from staying indoors and being covered up. In the rural parts of the country, in remote areas Afghan women deliver with no skilled help because women cannot leave home without a male and there aren't enough midwives to help every mother in need given Afghanistan's poor infrastructure.
(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
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      Badakshan, Faizabad, Afghanistan - 02/06/2011: FAIZABAD, AFGHANISTAN -JUNE 2 : Bibi Saiba, 25, suffers through hours of prolonged labor pains with her mother Bibi Jan (L) at her side at the Badakhshan Provincial hospital June 2, 2011, in Faizabad, Badakshan. Bibi Saiba was told that she would have to get cesarean section operation because the heart rate of the baby was too high, three hours later her husband arrived to give permission. Crises put pregnant women at greater risk due to sudden loss of medical support, trauma, malnutrition, disease and exposure to violence. According to UNICEF, 52 babies out of every 1,000 die within two weeks of birth and 134 die before their first birthday. While 1 in 8 women in Afghanistan die during pregnancy or childbirth making it the worst place in the world to be a mother. Many mothers are having children too young along with diet, and extreme poverty they face huge challenges having a healthy pregnancy. Afghan women also deal with vitamin D deficiency from staying indoors and being covered up. In the rural parts of the country, in remote areas Afghan women deliver with no skilled help because women cannot leave home without a male and there aren't enough midwives to help every mother in need given Afghanistan's poor infrastructure. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
      Credit: Getty Images
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DELETE THIS IMAGE IT IS TOO SIMILAR TO THE NEXT ONE, IMAGE 71

DELETE THIS IMAGE IT IS TOO SIMILAR TO THE NEXT ONE, IMAGE 71
  • Bibi Saiba, 25, suffers through hours of prolonged labor pains as she waits for her husband to arrive to approve an emergency cesarean section as her mother and aunt stand by in the birthing room at the Badakshan Provincial hospital, in Faizabad, 

May 28,2011Bibi Saiba, 25, suffers through hours of prolonged labor pains as she waits for her husband to arrive to approve an emergency cesarean section as her mother and aunt stand by in the birthing room at the Badakshan Provincial hospital, in Faizabad, 

May 28,2011
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      Badakshan, Faizabad, Afghanistan - 28/05/2011: Bibi Saiba, 25, suffers through hours of prolonged labor pains as she waits for her husband to arrive to approve an emergency cesarean section as her mother and aunt stand by in the birthing room at the Badakshan Provincial hospital, in Faizabad, May 28,2011
      Credit: Getty Images
  • Hospital staff get an Afghan woman ready for her emergency cesarean section operation at the Badakhshan Provincial hospital in Faizabad, Badakshan.  Mayina in her 7th pregnancy has lost 5 children and is struggling to keep this baby. 
May 27, 2011Hospital staff get an Afghan woman ready for her emergency cesarean section operation at the Badakhshan Provincial hospital in Faizabad, Badakshan.  Mayina in her 7th pregnancy has lost 5 children and is struggling to keep this baby. 
May 27, 2011
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      Badakshan, Faizabad, Afghanistan - 27/05/2011: Hospital staff get an Afghan woman ready for her emergency cesarean section operation at the Badakhshan Provincial hospital in Faizabad, Badakshan. Mayina in her 7th pregnancy has lost 5 children and is struggling to keep this baby. May 27, 2011
      Credit: Getty Images
  • KABUL,  AFGHANISTAN -MAY 13 : An Afghan woman prays at the Karti Sakhi shrine on April 24, 2011 in Kabul, Afghanistan. For prayer Afghan women have completely separate sections inside the mosque fro the men for prayer however in many parts of the country where violence and the Taliban are a way of life women only pray at home.


(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)KABUL,  AFGHANISTAN -MAY 13 : An Afghan woman prays at the Karti Sakhi shrine on April 24, 2011 in Kabul, Afghanistan. For prayer Afghan women have completely separate sections inside the mosque fro the men for prayer however in many parts of the country where violence and the Taliban are a way of life women only pray at home.


(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
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      Kabul, Afghanistan - 13/05/2011: KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -MAY 13 : An Afghan woman prays at the Karti Sakhi shrine on April 24, 2011 in Kabul, Afghanistan. For prayer Afghan women have completely separate sections inside the mosque fro the men for prayer however in many parts of the country where violence and the Taliban are a way of life women only pray at home. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
      Credit: Getty Images
  • BAMIYAN, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 8:  Rahima ,18, looks out the window from her room at a woman's shelter October 8, 2010 in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. Rahima was a child bride, forced to marry at age 11, she is from Maydan Wardak. Until women's shelters were started, something that was unknown here before 2003, a woman in an abusive marriage usually had no one to go to for protection. The problems many battered and abused women are confronting are deeply ingrained in a culture that has been mainly governed by tribal law. Since the overthrow of the Taliban in 2001, a more concrete idea of women’s rights has begun to take hold,  promoted by the newly created Ministry of Women’s Affairs and a small community of women’s advocates.
(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)BAMIYAN, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 8:  Rahima ,18, looks out the window from her room at a woman's shelter October 8, 2010 in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. Rahima was a child bride, forced to marry at age 11, she is from Maydan Wardak. Until women's shelters were started, something that was unknown here before 2003, a woman in an abusive marriage usually had no one to go to for protection. The problems many battered and abused women are confronting are deeply ingrained in a culture that has been mainly governed by tribal law. Since the overthrow of the Taliban in 2001, a more concrete idea of women’s rights has begun to take hold,  promoted by the newly created Ministry of Women’s Affairs and a small community of women’s advocates.
(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
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      Bamiyan, Afghanistan - 07/10/2010: BAMIYAN, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 8: Rahima ,18, looks out the window from her room at a woman's shelter October 8, 2010 in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. Rahima was a child bride, forced to marry at age 11, she is from Maydan Wardak. Until women's shelters were started, something that was unknown here before 2003, a woman in an abusive marriage usually had no one to go to for protection. The problems many battered and abused women are confronting are deeply ingrained in a culture that has been mainly governed by tribal law. Since the overthrow of the Taliban in 2001, a more concrete idea of women’s rights has begun to take hold, promoted by the newly created Ministry of Women’s Affairs and a small community of women’s advocates. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
      Credit: Getty Images
  • Nazgul, age 35, a self-immolation victim is shrouded by her headscarf at the Herat Regional hospital in Herat. Every home has cooking oil so immolation is available for a suicidal female who feels like she has had enough suffering in her life. 

February 3, 2006

Nazgul, age 35, a self-immolation victim is shrouded by her headscarf at the Herat Regional hospital in Herat. Every home has cooking oil so immolation is available for a suicidal female who feels like she has had enough suffering in her life. 

February 3, 2006
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      Herat, Afghanistan - 17/11/2006: Nazgul, age 35, a self-immolation victim is shrouded by her headscarf at the Herat Regional hospital in Herat. Every home has cooking oil so immolation is available for a suicidal female who feels like she has had enough suffering in her life. February 3, 2006
      Credit: Getty Images
  • Mahboba, 7, stands against a bullet-ridden wall waiting to be seen at
a health clinic. She suffers from a disfiguring skin disease called Leishmaniasis which is a parasitical bacterial infection transmitted from tiny sand fleas. 
March 1, 2002
Mahboba, 7, stands against a bullet-ridden wall waiting to be seen at
a health clinic. She suffers from a disfiguring skin disease called Leishmaniasis which is a parasitical bacterial infection transmitted from tiny sand fleas. 
March 1, 2002
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      Kabul, Afghanistan - 11/02/2011: Mahboba, 7, stands against a bullet-ridden wall waiting to be seen at a health clinic. She suffers from a disfiguring skin disease called Leishmaniasis which is a parasitical bacterial infection transmitted from tiny sand fleas. March 1, 2002
      Credit: Paula Bronstein
  • An Afghan daughter watches her mother read from the holy Koran after friday prayers at a local mosque in Kabul
April 24, 2011

An Afghan daughter watches her mother read from the holy Koran after friday prayers at a local mosque in Kabul
April 24, 2011
  • Afghan women pray  as they gather during friday prayers at the Madinatul-Elm mosque in Kabul. 

June,3, 2011
Afghan women pray  as they gather during friday prayers at the Madinatul-Elm mosque in Kabul. 

June,3, 2011
  • KABUL,  AFGHANISTAN -MAY 13 : Afghan women and girls pray during friday prayers at a local mosque on April 24, 2011 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghan women have completely separate sections inside the mosque from the men for prayer however in many parts of the country where violence and the Taliban are a way of life women only pray at home.


(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)KABUL,  AFGHANISTAN -MAY 13 : Afghan women and girls pray during friday prayers at a local mosque on April 24, 2011 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghan women have completely separate sections inside the mosque from the men for prayer however in many parts of the country where violence and the Taliban are a way of life women only pray at home.


(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
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      Kabul, Afghanistan - 06/05/2011: KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -MAY 13 : Afghan women and girls pray during friday prayers at a local mosque on April 24, 2011 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghan women have completely separate sections inside the mosque from the men for prayer however in many parts of the country where violence and the Taliban are a way of life women only pray at home. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
      Credit: Getty Images
  • At a female-only detox center in Kabul, a female heroin addict looks at a poster depicting a man being strangled by poppy plants. 
May 22, 2005

At a female-only detox center in Kabul, a female heroin addict looks at a poster depicting a man being strangled by poppy plants. 
May 22, 2005
  • Zaher, 14, smokes heroin along side his heroin addicted mother Sabera and her 11 year-old sister, Gulparai, at their home in Kabul.  The children began smoking after watching their widowed mother, a heroin addict for 4 years. 
August 27, 2007

Zaher, 14, smokes heroin along side his heroin addicted mother Sabera and her 11 year-old sister, Gulparai, at their home in Kabul.  The children began smoking after watching their widowed mother, a heroin addict for 4 years. 
August 27, 2007
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      Kabul, Afghanistan - 27/08/2007: Zaher, 14, smokes heroin along side his heroin addicted mother Sabera and her 11 year-old sister, Gulparai, at their home in Kabul. The children began smoking after watching their widowed mother, a heroin addict for 4 years. August 27, 2007
      Credit: Getty Images
  • Afghan women carry water from the river to their homes which have no running water in Chagcharan, At an altitude of 2,200 meters, Chaghcharan is the capitol of Ghor province which is the size of Switzerland. Many of the women cover their heads but traditionally do not wear burqas. 

October 21, 2002 
Afghan women carry water from the river to their homes which have no running water in Chagcharan, At an altitude of 2,200 meters, Chaghcharan is the capitol of Ghor province which is the size of Switzerland. Many of the women cover their heads but traditionally do not wear burqas. 

October 21, 2002
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      Chaghcharan, Ghor, Afghanistan - 21/10/2002: Afghan women carry water from the river to their homes which have no running water in Chagcharan, At an altitude of 2,200 meters, Chaghcharan is the capitol of Ghor province which is the size of Switzerland. Many of the women cover their heads but traditionally do not wear burqas. October 21, 2002
      Credit: Getty Images
  • KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - SEPTEMBER 20: Afghan girls wear their best dresses as they play outide celebrating the first day of Eid-al-Fitr, a three day holiday marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan September 20, 2009 in Kabul, Afghanistan. During the holiday Afghans visit friends and family exchanging gifts and feasting. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images) KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - SEPTEMBER 20: Afghan girls wear their best dresses as they play outide celebrating the first day of Eid-al-Fitr, a three day holiday marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan September 20, 2009 in Kabul, Afghanistan. During the holiday Afghans visit friends and family exchanging gifts and feasting. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
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      Kabul, Afghanistan - 20/09/2009: KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - SEPTEMBER 20: Afghan girls wear their best dresses as they play outide celebrating the first day of Eid-al-Fitr, a three day holiday marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan September 20, 2009 in Kabul, Afghanistan. During the holiday Afghans visit friends and family exchanging gifts and feasting. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
      Credit: Getty Images
  • Afghan children skateboard around a middle class neighborhood in Kabul. After decades of war many Afghan youth badly need an option for recreation. 

January 31,2009Afghan children skateboard around a middle class neighborhood in Kabul. After decades of war many Afghan youth badly need an option for recreation. 

January 31,2009
  • ERAQ, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 12:  Afghan girls listen to the teacher during class at the Naswani school October 12, 2010 in Eraq village, Afghanistan. In the peaceful province of Bamiyan girls are able to attend school without any fears unlike the violent Taliban infested areas.
(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)ERAQ, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 12:  Afghan girls listen to the teacher during class at the Naswani school October 12, 2010 in Eraq village, Afghanistan. In the peaceful province of Bamiyan girls are able to attend school without any fears unlike the violent Taliban infested areas.
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      Bamiyan, Eraq, Afghanistan - 13/10/2010: ERAQ, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 12: Afghan girls listen to the teacher during class at the Naswani school October 12, 2010 in Eraq village, Afghanistan. In the peaceful province of Bamiyan girls are able to attend school without any fears unlike the violent Taliban infested areas. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
      Credit: Getty Images
  • An Afghan woman covered in a wet, dirty burqa sits on a street begging for money during a snowfall in Kabul. 

February 16, 2003

An Afghan woman covered in a wet, dirty burqa sits on a street begging for money during a snowfall in Kabul. 

February 16, 2003
  • BAMIYAN, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 13:  Afghan girls listen during class at the Markaz high school October 13 2010 in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. In the peaceful province of Bamiyan girls are able to attend school without any fears unlike the violent Taliban infested areas.
(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)BAMIYAN, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 13:  Afghan girls listen during class at the Markaz high school October 13 2010 in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. In the peaceful province of Bamiyan girls are able to attend school without any fears unlike the violent Taliban infested areas.
(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
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      Bamiyan, Afghanistan - 13/10/2010: BAMIYAN, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 13: Afghan girls listen during class at the Markaz high school October 13 2010 in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. In the peaceful province of Bamiyan girls are able to attend school without any fears unlike the violent Taliban infested areas. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
      Credit: Getty Images
  • An Afghan child and her mother beg on the streets of Kabul as men leave a mosque after Friday prayer. An Afghan child and her mother beg on the streets of Kabul as men leave a mosque after Friday prayer.
  • 
 Salela, 4,tries to keep warm while working at a brick factory in Kabul.Child labor is common at the brick factories where the parents work as laborers, desperate to make more money enlisting their children to help doing the easy jobs. Brick factories are an economical, business that is still thriving.   
 Salela, 4,tries to keep warm while working at a brick factory in Kabul.Child labor is common at the brick factories where the parents work as laborers, desperate to make more money enlisting their children to help doing the easy jobs. Brick factories are an economical, business that is still thriving.
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      Kabul, Afghanistan - 12/10/2004: Salela, 4,tries to keep warm while working at a brick factory in Kabul.Child labor is common at the brick factories where the parents work as laborers, desperate to make more money enlisting their children to help doing the easy jobs. Brick factories are an economical, business that is still thriving.
      Credit: Getty Images
  • BAMIYAN, AFGHANISTAN -SEPTEMBER 2 :  Sima holds her baby Farzana, 1, outside their cave dwelling September 2, 2009 in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. Many of the impoverished families living in the caves say they are too poor to live anywhere else even though the government insists that they are doing damage to an the area  near the Buddhas which is a rare archaeological site. All are refugees who have fled areas of fighting during the Taliban era, went to other parts of Afghanistan but then returned again.  The cave dwellers are all Hazara who are religiously and ethnically distinct, and survivors of intense persecution by the Taliban. The Bamiyan region is the stronghold of the Hezb-i-Whadat party, the main faction representing the Shia Muslims of the centre of the country. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)BAMIYAN, AFGHANISTAN -SEPTEMBER 2 :  Sima holds her baby Farzana, 1, outside their cave dwelling September 2, 2009 in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. Many of the impoverished families living in the caves say they are too poor to live anywhere else even though the government insists that they are doing damage to an the area  near the Buddhas which is a rare archaeological site. All are refugees who have fled areas of fighting during the Taliban era, went to other parts of Afghanistan but then returned again.  The cave dwellers are all Hazara who are religiously and ethnically distinct, and survivors of intense persecution by the Taliban. The Bamiyan region is the stronghold of the Hezb-i-Whadat party, the main faction representing the Shia Muslims of the centre of the country. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
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      Bamiyan, Afghanistan - 02/09/2009: BAMIYAN, AFGHANISTAN -SEPTEMBER 2 : Sima holds her baby Farzana, 1, outside their cave dwelling September 2, 2009 in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. Many of the impoverished families living in the caves say they are too poor to live anywhere else even though the government insists that they are doing damage to an the area near the Buddhas which is a rare archaeological site. All are refugees who have fled areas of fighting during the Taliban era, went to other parts of Afghanistan but then returned again. The cave dwellers are all Hazara who are religiously and ethnically distinct, and survivors of intense persecution by the Taliban. The Bamiyan region is the stronghold of the Hezb-i-Whadat party, the main faction representing the Shia Muslims of the centre of the country. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
      Credit: Getty Images
  • MAZAR-E-SHARIF, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 21: A female prisoner stands in the courtyard inside the women's prison October 21, 2010 in Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan. There are 38 women and 10 children currently living at the small prison. According to Afghanistan's Ministry for Women and the Independent Human Rights Commission,many females that are incarcerated are detained for "moral crimes". These so-called crimes include everything from running away from home, refusing to marry, marriage without proper family consent, and attempted adultery. In the worst cases women are put away for many years, accused of murder when usually another person has actually commmited the crime. The laws in Afghanistan are easily adapted, working against the rights of Afghan females. Many times the courts refer to Islamic Sharia law which gives them more freedom to abuse a corrupted legal system.
(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)MAZAR-E-SHARIF, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 21: A female prisoner stands in the courtyard inside the women's prison October 21, 2010 in Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan. There are 38 women and 10 children currently living at the small prison. According to Afghanistan's Ministry for Women and the Independent Human Rights Commission,many females that are incarcerated are detained for "moral crimes". These so-called crimes include everything from running away from home, refusing to marry, marriage without proper family consent, and attempted adultery. In the worst cases women are put away for many years, accused of murder when usually another person has actually commmited the crime. The laws in Afghanistan are easily adapted, working against the rights of Afghan females. Many times the courts refer to Islamic Sharia law which gives them more freedom to abuse a corrupted legal system.
(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
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      Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan - 21/10/2010: MAZAR-E-SHARIF, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 21: A female prisoner stands in the courtyard inside the women's prison October 21, 2010 in Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan. There are 38 women and 10 children currently living at the small prison. According to Afghanistan's Ministry for Women and the Independent Human Rights Commission,many females that are incarcerated are detained for "moral crimes". These so-called crimes include everything from running away from home, refusing to marry, marriage without proper family consent, and attempted adultery. In the worst cases women are put away for many years, accused of murder when usually another person has actually commmited the crime. The laws in Afghanistan are easily adapted, working against the rights of Afghan females. Many times the courts refer to Islamic Sharia law which gives them more freedom to abuse a corrupted legal system. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
      Credit: Getty Images
  •  A beggar looks through the frosted window of a restaurant hoping to get leftovers. She begs to help her family out after school. 

January 13, 2002

 A beggar looks through the frosted window of a restaurant hoping to get leftovers. She begs to help her family out after school. 

January 13, 2002
  • YAKAWLANG, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 12:  Fartima, age 65, suffers from the advanced stages of Leprosy,at a home for the handicapped sponsored by Helping Hands Scandanavian charity October 12, 2010 in Yakawlang, Afghanistan. Leprosy remains a largely neglected disease, especially in the rural areas of the country where little is known about it, and many suffer from the  stigma and lack of knowledge that is a treatable disease. According to WHO,*Leprosy is prevalent in 13 of 34 provinces in Afghanistan. Many Leprosy patients live in remote areas. There are 12 centers providing leprosy control services in the country that are mainly located in the Central Highlands - the region where Leprosy is highly prevalent ( Bamyan, etc).From 2001 to 2009, over 300 new cases have been detected and fully treated.
(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)YAKAWLANG, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 12:  Fartima, age 65, suffers from the advanced stages of Leprosy,at a home for the handicapped sponsored by Helping Hands Scandanavian charity October 12, 2010 in Yakawlang, Afghanistan. Leprosy remains a largely neglected disease, especially in the rural areas of the country where little is known about it, and many suffer from the  stigma and lack of knowledge that is a treatable disease. According to WHO,*Leprosy is prevalent in 13 of 34 provinces in Afghanistan. Many Leprosy patients live in remote areas. There are 12 centers providing leprosy control services in the country that are mainly located in the Central Highlands - the region where Leprosy is highly prevalent ( Bamyan, etc).From 2001 to 2009, over 300 new cases have been detected and fully treated.
(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
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      Bamiyan, Yakawlang, Afghanistan - 12/10/2010: YAKAWLANG, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 12: Fartima, age 65, suffers from the advanced stages of Leprosy,at a home for the handicapped sponsored by Helping Hands Scandanavian charity October 12, 2010 in Yakawlang, Afghanistan. Leprosy remains a largely neglected disease, especially in the rural areas of the country where little is known about it, and many suffer from the stigma and lack of knowledge that is a treatable disease. According to WHO,*Leprosy is prevalent in 13 of 34 provinces in Afghanistan. Many Leprosy patients live in remote areas. There are 12 centers providing leprosy control services in the country that are mainly located in the Central Highlands - the region where Leprosy is highly prevalent ( Bamyan, etc).From 2001 to 2009, over 300 new cases have been detected and fully treated. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
      Credit: Getty Images
  • KABUL, AFGHANISTAN-OCTOBER 12: Bibi Mariam, age 85 tries to keep warm along side her familiy October 12,2004 at the Babrak Garden Refugee camp in Kabul, Afghanistan. Over 150 Afghan families all labeled as Internally Displaced Peoples ( IDP ) according to the UNHCR live in squalor in the tented camp in the capitol city where they remain homeless. KABUL, AFGHANISTAN-OCTOBER 12: Bibi Mariam, age 85 tries to keep warm along side her familiy October 12,2004 at the Babrak Garden Refugee camp in Kabul, Afghanistan. Over 150 Afghan families all labeled as Internally Displaced Peoples ( IDP ) according to the UNHCR live in squalor in the tented camp in the capitol city where they remain homeless.
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      Kabul, Afghanistan - 12/10/2004: KABUL, AFGHANISTAN-OCTOBER 12: Bibi Mariam, age 85 tries to keep warm along side her familiy October 12,2004 at the Babrak Garden Refugee camp in Kabul, Afghanistan. Over 150 Afghan families all labeled as Internally Displaced Peoples ( IDP ) according to the UNHCR live in squalor in the tented camp in the capitol city where they remain homeless.
      Credit: Getty Images
  • BAMIYAN, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 14:  Naria, an Afghan hair dresser looks out the window of the salon for the groom along side Suhella Rezi, who is attending her sister's wedding October 14, 2010 in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. At local beauty salons, behind drawn curtains, isolated from the males, Afghan women spend hours getting ready for engagement parties and weddings. In accordance with Afghan culture the men are required to be segregated from the women with the exception of the bride and groom.
(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)BAMIYAN, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 14:  Naria, an Afghan hair dresser looks out the window of the salon for the groom along side Suhella Rezi, who is attending her sister's wedding October 14, 2010 in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. At local beauty salons, behind drawn curtains, isolated from the males, Afghan women spend hours getting ready for engagement parties and weddings. In accordance with Afghan culture the men are required to be segregated from the women with the exception of the bride and groom.
(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
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      Bamiyan, Afghanistan - 09/10/2010: BAMIYAN, AFGHANISTAN - OCTOBER 14: Naria, an Afghan hair dresser looks out the window of the salon for the groom along side Suhella Rezi, who is attending her sister's wedding October 14, 2010 in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. At local beauty salons, behind drawn curtains, isolated from the males, Afghan women spend hours getting ready for engagement parties and weddings. In accordance with Afghan culture the men are required to be segregated from the women with the exception of the bride and groom. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
      Credit: Getty Images
  •  Afghan women head off to an engagement party, leaving a local beauty parlor in Kabul. 

October 17, 2010 Afghan women head off to an engagement party, leaving a local beauty parlor in Kabul. 

October 17, 2010
  •  Najilla Ahmadi the bride to be gets her wedding veil ready at the local beauty palor where family help get her dressed for the big engagement party in Kabul, Afghanistan on Jan 4th,01.
Paula Bronstein/Getty Images Najilla Ahmadi the bride to be gets her wedding veil ready at the local beauty palor where family help get her dressed for the big engagement party in Kabul, Afghanistan on Jan 4th,01.
Paula Bronstein/Getty Images
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      Kabul, Afghanistan - 04/01/2002: Najilla Ahmadi the bride to be gets her wedding veil ready at the local beauty palor where family help get her dressed for the big engagement party in Kabul, Afghanistan on Jan 4th,01. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images
  • An Afghan woman votes in the nationÕs first Parliamentary Election in the capitol city of Kabul. The election is was seen as part of a major step for the country to restore democracy and stability almost four years after the Taliban was ousted. 

September 18, 2005An Afghan woman votes in the nationÕs first Parliamentary Election in the capitol city of Kabul. The election is was seen as part of a major step for the country to restore democracy and stability almost four years after the Taliban was ousted. 

September 18, 2005
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      Kabul, Afghanistan - 23/11/2009: An Afghan woman votes in the nationÕs first Parliamentary Election in the capitol city of Kabul. The election is was seen as part of a major step for the country to restore democracy and stability almost four years after the Taliban was ousted. September 18, 2005
      Credit: Getty Images
  • KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -MARCH 31: Afghan women cheer attending an election rally for Afghan vice presidential candidate Habiba Sarabi in Kabul, March 31, 2014. Afghans will go to the polls to vote on April 5th in Afghanistan's Presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)


KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -MARCH 31: Afghan women cheer attending an election rally for Afghan vice presidential candidate Habiba Sarabi in Kabul, March 31, 2014. Afghans will go to the polls to vote on April 5th in Afghanistan's Presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)
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      Kabul, Afghanistan - 31/03/2014: KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -MARCH 31: Afghan women cheer attending an election rally for Afghan vice presidential candidate Habiba Sarabi in Kabul, March 31, 2014. Afghans will go to the polls to vote on April 5th in Afghanistan's Presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)
      Credit: Paula Bronstein for Wall Street
  • MAYMANA, AFGHANISTAN -APRIL 2: Afghan women and children attend a campaign rally for presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah in Maymana, Faryab province, Afghanistan on April 2, 2014. In Kabul today a suicide bomber wearing a military uniform killed six police officers inside the Interior Ministry compound. This is the latest violence as the Taliban continues to try and disrupt this weekend's presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)


MAYMANA, AFGHANISTAN -APRIL 2: Afghan women and children attend a campaign rally for presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah in Maymana, Faryab province, Afghanistan on April 2, 2014. In Kabul today a suicide bomber wearing a military uniform killed six police officers inside the Interior Ministry compound. This is the latest violence as the Taliban continues to try and disrupt this weekend's presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)
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      Kabul, Afghanistan - 03/04/2014: MAYMANA, AFGHANISTAN -APRIL 2: Afghan women and children attend a campaign rally for presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah in Maymana, Faryab province, Afghanistan on April 2, 2014. In Kabul today a suicide bomber wearing a military uniform killed six police officers inside the Interior Ministry compound. This is the latest violence as the Taliban continues to try and disrupt this weekend's presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)
      Credit: Paula Bronstein for Wall Street
  • GHARMBOLOQ,  AFGHANISTAN -JUNE 12  :  Hava Gul, 70, waits to see a doctor  complaining about her left eye at a local mosque made into a makeshift mobile health clinic June 12, 2011, in the village of Gharmboloq, in Shahidan district, Afghanistan.  Mobile health units (MHU) employed by the Agency for Assistance and Development of Afghanistan (AADA)  supported by the United Nation Population Fund (UNFPA) cover communities that are inaccessible, underserved and underprivileged. There are six mobile health teams working in Bamiyan, Yakawlang, Waras, Panjab and Kahmard districts. Each mobile health unit consists of a doctor, a mid-wife, and a vaccinator. Their mandate is to reach approximately 100,000 individuals in 400 villages providing free medical health care.
(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)GHARMBOLOQ,  AFGHANISTAN -JUNE 12  :  Hava Gul, 70, waits to see a doctor  complaining about her left eye at a local mosque made into a makeshift mobile health clinic June 12, 2011, in the village of Gharmboloq, in Shahidan district, Afghanistan.  Mobile health units (MHU) employed by the Agency for Assistance and Development of Afghanistan (AADA)  supported by the United Nation Population Fund (UNFPA) cover communities that are inaccessible, underserved and underprivileged. There are six mobile health teams working in Bamiyan, Yakawlang, Waras, Panjab and Kahmard districts. Each mobile health unit consists of a doctor, a mid-wife, and a vaccinator. Their mandate is to reach approximately 100,000 individuals in 400 villages providing free medical health care.
(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
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      Shahidan, Gharmboloq, Afghanistan - 11/06/2011: GHARMBOLOQ, AFGHANISTAN -JUNE 12 : Hava Gul, 70, waits to see a doctor complaining about her left eye at a local mosque made into a makeshift mobile health clinic June 12, 2011, in the village of Gharmboloq, in Shahidan district, Afghanistan. Mobile health units (MHU) employed by the Agency for Assistance and Development of Afghanistan (AADA) supported by the United Nation Population Fund (UNFPA) cover communities that are inaccessible, underserved and underprivileged. There are six mobile health teams working in Bamiyan, Yakawlang, Waras, Panjab and Kahmard districts. Each mobile health unit consists of a doctor, a mid-wife, and a vaccinator. Their mandate is to reach approximately 100,000 individuals in 400 villages providing free medical health care. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
      Credit: Getty Images
  • KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -APRIL 1: Young Afghan women cheer as they attend an election campaign rally for Afghan presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani in Kabul, April 1, 2014. Afghans will go to the polls to vote on April 5th in Afghanistan's Presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)


KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -APRIL 1: Young Afghan women cheer as they attend an election campaign rally for Afghan presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani in Kabul, April 1, 2014. Afghans will go to the polls to vote on April 5th in Afghanistan's Presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)
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      Kabul, Afghanistan - 01/04/2014: KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -APRIL 1: Young Afghan women cheer as they attend an election campaign rally for Afghan presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani in Kabul, April 1, 2014. Afghans will go to the polls to vote on April 5th in Afghanistan's Presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)
      Credit: Paula Bronstein for Wall Street Journal
  • KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -APRIL 3: A woman wearing a burqa tries to keep warm as Kabul prepares for the elections on April 3, 2014. Yesterday in Kabul a suicide bomber wearing a military uniform killed six police officers inside the Interior Ministry compound. This was the latest violence as the Taliban vows to disrupt this weekend's presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)


KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -APRIL 3: A woman wearing a burqa tries to keep warm as Kabul prepares for the elections on April 3, 2014. Yesterday in Kabul a suicide bomber wearing a military uniform killed six police officers inside the Interior Ministry compound. This was the latest violence as the Taliban vows to disrupt this weekend's presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)
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    • women_afghangallery003.jpg
      Kabul, Afghanistan - 03/04/2014: KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -APRIL 3: A woman wearing a burqa tries to keep warm as Kabul prepares for the elections on April 3, 2014. Yesterday in Kabul a suicide bomber wearing a military uniform killed six police officers inside the Interior Ministry compound. This was the latest violence as the Taliban vows to disrupt this weekend's presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)
      Credit: Paula Bronstein for Wall Street
  • KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -MARCH 31: Afghan girls gets ready to perform before an election rally for Afghan vice presidential candidate Habiba Sarabi in Kabul, March 31, 2014. Afghans will go to the polls to vote on April 5th in Afghanistan's Presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)


KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -MARCH 31: Afghan girls gets ready to perform before an election rally for Afghan vice presidential candidate Habiba Sarabi in Kabul, March 31, 2014. Afghans will go to the polls to vote on April 5th in Afghanistan's Presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)
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    • women_afghangallery002.jpg
      Kabul, Afghanistan - 31/03/2014: KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -MARCH 31: Afghan girls gets ready to perform before an election rally for Afghan vice presidential candidate Habiba Sarabi in Kabul, March 31, 2014. Afghans will go to the polls to vote on April 5th in Afghanistan's Presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)
      Credit: Paula Bronstein for Wall Street
  • KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -APRIL 1: Young Afghan women cheer as they arrive at an election campaign rally for Afghan presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani in Kabul, April 1, 2014. Afghans will go to the polls to vote on April 5th in Afghanistan's Presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)


KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -APRIL 1: Young Afghan women cheer as they arrive at an election campaign rally for Afghan presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani in Kabul, April 1, 2014. Afghans will go to the polls to vote on April 5th in Afghanistan's Presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)
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    • women_afghangallery004.jpg
      Kabul, Afghanistan - 02/04/2014: KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -APRIL 1: Young Afghan women cheer as they arrive at an election campaign rally for Afghan presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani in Kabul, April 1, 2014. Afghans will go to the polls to vote on April 5th in Afghanistan's Presidential election. The election is the third presidential poll since the fall of the Taliban. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/ for the Wall Street Journal)
      Credit: Paula Bronstein for Wall Street Journal
  • Afghan girl stands on a hill at a local cemetery In Kabul after attending a funeral. 

October 18, 2009Afghan girl stands on a hill at a local cemetery In Kabul after attending a funeral. 

October 18, 2009
  • Burn victims Asan Bibi ,9, (R) and her sister Salima,13, (L) stand in the hallway of the Mirwais hospital in Kandahar.  They were accidently attacked when a US military helicopter hit their tent in the middle of the night on October 3rd. Three members of the family were killed. The girls belong to the Kuchi, a nomadic tribe living in tents in the desert. They are extremely vulnerable to a war they have little understanding of. 
October 13, 2009
Burn victims Asan Bibi ,9, (R) and her sister Salima,13, (L) stand in the hallway of the Mirwais hospital in Kandahar.  They were accidently attacked when a US military helicopter hit their tent in the middle of the night on October 3rd. Three members of the family were killed. The girls belong to the Kuchi, a nomadic tribe living in tents in the desert. They are extremely vulnerable to a war they have little understanding of. 
October 13, 2009
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      Kabul, Afghanistan - 23/11/2009: Burn victims Asan Bibi ,9, (R) and her sister Salima,13, (L) stand in the hallway of the Mirwais hospital in Kandahar. They were accidently attacked when a US military helicopter hit their tent in the middle of the night on October 3rd. Three members of the family were killed. The girls belong to the Kuchi, a nomadic tribe living in tents in the desert. They are extremely vulnerable to a war they have little understanding of. October 13, 2009
      Credit: Getty Images
  •  Afghan bride Zahara,24, is held by the grrom Gulam Ali as they leave for the wedding ceremony in a taxi October 14, 2010 in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. At local beauty salons, behind drawn curtains, isolated from the males, Afghan women spend hours getting ready for engagement parties and weddings. In accordance with Afghan culture the men are required to be segregated from the women with the exception of the bride and groom.
(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images) Afghan bride Zahara,24, is held by the grrom Gulam Ali as they leave for the wedding ceremony in a taxi October 14, 2010 in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. At local beauty salons, behind drawn curtains, isolated from the males, Afghan women spend hours getting ready for engagement parties and weddings. In accordance with Afghan culture the men are required to be segregated from the women with the exception of the bride and groom.
(Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
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    • women_afghangallery012.jpg
      Bamiyan, Afghanistan - 09/10/2010: Afghan bride Zahara,24, is held by the grrom Gulam Ali as they leave for the wedding ceremony in a taxi October 14, 2010 in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. At local beauty salons, behind drawn curtains, isolated from the males, Afghan women spend hours getting ready for engagement parties and weddings. In accordance with Afghan culture the men are required to be segregated from the women with the exception of the bride and groom. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
      Credit: Getty Images

 

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