British Army in India during the First World War
Peter Charlesworth Collection
Photographs by Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth. In 1915, Lieutenant Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth, a Territorial Army volunteer, was sent with his regiment to India at the outbreak of the Great War. E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the lives of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.

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  • "Group on board."   Members of the 4th Battalion Queen's Regiment sail from Southampton to Bombay on board the S.S Circassia.  Clockwise from top left: "Nalder, Donavan, Keppel Palmers, Sanderson, St Clair, Stokes and Norman."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

The day and month of this image within 1915 is unknown."Group on board."   Members of the 4th Battalion Queen's Regiment sail from Southampton to Bombay on board the S.S Circassia.  Clockwise from top left: "Nalder, Donavan, Keppel Palmers, Sanderson, St Clair, Stokes and Norman."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

The day and month of this image within 1915 is unknown.
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      India - 01/01/1915: "Group on board." Members of the 4th Battalion Queen's Regiment sail from Southampton to Bombay on board the S.S Circassia. Clockwise from top left: "Nalder, Donavan, Keppel Palmers, Sanderson, St Clair, Stokes and Norman." Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. The day and month of this image within 1915 is unknown.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • An armoured vehicle believed to be a Rolls Royce.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.An armoured vehicle believed to be a Rolls Royce.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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      India - 01/01/1917: An armoured vehicle believed to be a Rolls Royce. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Major Sir Broderick Hartwell, Mrs Keyworth & Lady H." (Man second from left is believed to be Mr Keyworth and Lady H stands for Lady Hartwell.) Many of the officers' wives and families spent the war with their husbands/fathers while they served in India.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."Major Sir Broderick Hartwell, Mrs Keyworth & Lady H." (Man second from left is believed to be Mr Keyworth and Lady H stands for Lady Hartwell.) Many of the officers' wives and families spent the war with their husbands/fathers while they served in India.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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      India - 01/01/1917: "Major Sir Broderick Hartwell, Mrs Keyworth & Lady H." (Man second from left is believed to be Mr Keyworth and Lady H stands for Lady Hartwell.) Many of the officers' wives and families spent the war with their husbands/fathers while they served in India. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • Lieutenant Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth in Lucknow.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.Lieutenant Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth in Lucknow.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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      Lucknow, India - 01/01/1917: Lieutenant Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth in Lucknow. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Floods after Sudden Storm.  Afghan Campaign - 1919."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

The day and month of this image within 1919 is unknown."Floods after Sudden Storm.  Afghan Campaign - 1919."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

The day and month of this image within 1919 is unknown.
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      India - 01/01/1919: "Floods after Sudden Storm. Afghan Campaign - 1919." Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. The day and month of this image within 1919 is unknown.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • Captain "G.L. Groves" in Charat" presumed to be writing a letter home.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.Captain "G.L. Groves" in Charat" presumed to be writing a letter home.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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      Charat, India - 01/01/1917: Captain "G.L. Groves" in Charat" presumed to be writing a letter home. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Mrs Keyworth and Peter." Many of the officers' wives and families spent the war with their husbands/fathers while they served in India.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."Mrs Keyworth and Peter." Many of the officers' wives and families spent the war with their husbands/fathers while they served in India.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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      India - 01/01/1917: "Mrs Keyworth and Peter." Many of the officers' wives and families spent the war with their husbands/fathers while they served in India. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "At the Kabuli Gate - Outside.  The Disturbances. Peshawar -1919."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

The day and month of this image within 1919 is unknown."At the Kabuli Gate - Outside.  The Disturbances. Peshawar -1919."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

The day and month of this image within 1919 is unknown.
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    • ech00144.jpg
      Peshawar, India - 01/01/1919: "At the Kabuli Gate - Outside. The Disturbances. Peshawar -1919." Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. The day and month of this image within 1919 is unknown.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Mrs Farmer, Farmer and Farnell." Many of the officers' wives and families spent the war with their husbands/fathers while they served in India.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."Mrs Farmer, Farmer and Farnell." Many of the officers' wives and families spent the war with their husbands/fathers while they served in India.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00129.jpg
      India - 01/01/1917: "Mrs Farmer, Farmer and Farnell." Many of the officers' wives and families spent the war with their husbands/fathers while they served in India. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Race - Sports day at Dagshai - 1917"

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.

The day and month of this image within 1917 is unknown."Race - Sports day at Dagshai - 1917"

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.

The day and month of this image within 1917 is unknown.
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    • ech00216.jpg
      Dagshai, India - 01/01/1917: "Race - Sports day at Dagshai - 1917" Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. The day and month of this image within 1917 is unknown.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Major Sir Broderick Hartwell, at the sports day at Dagshai - 1917"

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

The day and month of this image within 1917 is unknown."Major Sir Broderick Hartwell, at the sports day at Dagshai - 1917"

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

The day and month of this image within 1917 is unknown.
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    • ech00157.jpg
      Dagshai, India - 01/01/1917: "Major Sir Broderick Hartwell, at the sports day at Dagshai - 1917" Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. The day and month of this image within 1917 is unknown.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Bruce Hood and dogs"

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."Bruce Hood and dogs"

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00192.jpg
      India - 01/01/1917: "Bruce Hood and dogs" Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • Alexandra Dock, Bombay "D Coy Embarking" on the " s.s Konigin Luise"  (a German Liner handed over at the Armistice) bound for Plymouth Sound.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.Alexandra Dock, Bombay "D Coy Embarking" on the " s.s Konigin Luise"  (a German Liner handed over at the Armistice) bound for Plymouth Sound.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.
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    • ech00132.jpg
      Bombay, India - 18/09/1919: Alexandra Dock, Bombay "D Coy Embarking" on the " s.s Konigin Luise" (a German Liner handed over at the Armistice) bound for Plymouth Sound. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • A warship, believed to be a "Dutch gunboat" as seen from the decks of the " s.s Konigin Luise"  (a German Liner handed over at the Armistice) bound for Plymouth Sound. The ship was to transport the 4th Queen's Regiment back to the Britain.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.A warship, believed to be a "Dutch gunboat" as seen from the decks of the " s.s Konigin Luise"  (a German Liner handed over at the Armistice) bound for Plymouth Sound. The ship was to transport the 4th Queen's Regiment back to the Britain.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.
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    • ech00205.jpg
      Alexandra Dock, Bombay, India - 18/09/1919: A warship, believed to be a "Dutch gunboat" as seen from the decks of the " s.s Konigin Luise" (a German Liner handed over at the Armistice) bound for Plymouth Sound. The ship was to transport the 4th Queen's Regiment back to the Britain. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "A blindfold boxing match."  Entertaining the troops while homeward bound on board the "Konigin Luise" prior to their arrival in Britain on the 12th November 1919.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images."A blindfold boxing match."  Entertaining the troops while homeward bound on board the "Konigin Luise" prior to their arrival in Britain on the 12th November 1919.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.
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      Bombay, India - 01/10/1919: "A blindfold boxing match." Entertaining the troops while homeward bound on board the "Konigin Luise" prior to their arrival in Britain on the 12th November 1919. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Subhan Han our Shikari." A shikari is a guide for big-game hunting - photograph believed to be taken in Srinagar.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."Subhan Han our Shikari." A shikari is a guide for big-game hunting - photograph believed to be taken in Srinagar.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00201.jpg
      Srinagar, India - 01/01/1917: "Subhan Han our Shikari." A shikari is a guide for big-game hunting - photograph believed to be taken in Srinagar. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • Lieutenant "E.L. Turner in Lucknow."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.Lieutenant "E.L. Turner in Lucknow."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00219.jpg
      Lucknow, India - 01/01/1917: Lieutenant "E.L. Turner in Lucknow." Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • Ahamdu on board the houseboat, the Minnehaha on lake Dal.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.Ahamdu on board the houseboat, the Minnehaha on lake Dal.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00195.jpg
      Dal Lake, Kashmir, India - 01/01/1917: Ahamdu on board the houseboat, the Minnehaha on lake Dal. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • A view of the Shah Hamdan mosque on the bank of the Jhelum River in Srinagar with the Hari Parbat Fort on the hill in the background.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.A view of the Shah Hamdan mosque on the bank of the Jhelum River in Srinagar with the Hari Parbat Fort on the hill in the background.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00210.jpg
      Srinagar, India - 01/01/1917: A view of the Shah Hamdan mosque on the bank of the Jhelum River in Srinagar with the Hari Parbat Fort on the hill in the background. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "The Taj Mahal - Agra."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."The Taj Mahal - Agra."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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      Agra, India - 01/01/1917: "The Taj Mahal - Agra." Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • A view of the Asafi Mosque at Bara Imambara, a Mogul Palace.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.A view of the Asafi Mosque at Bara Imambara, a Mogul Palace.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00159.jpg
      Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India - 01/01/1917: A view of the Asafi Mosque at Bara Imambara, a Mogul Palace. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "A country boat working upstream on the Shadipur Canal."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."A country boat working upstream on the Shadipur Canal."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00178.jpg
      Shadipur Canal, Srinagar, India - 01/01/1917: "A country boat working upstream on the Shadipur Canal." Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "A country boat on the Shadipur Canal."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."A country boat on the Shadipur Canal."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00194.jpg
      Shadipur Canal, Srinagar, India - 01/01/1917: "A country boat on the Shadipur Canal." Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Hard water on way to Sundubal."  The boatmen are pulling "our Shikara" (our boat) up a difficult stretch of water called Munshi Bagh near Srinagar.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."Hard water on way to Sundubal."  The boatmen are pulling "our Shikara" (our boat) up a difficult stretch of water called Munshi Bagh near Srinagar.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00190.jpg
      Sundubal, Shrinigar, India - 01/01/1917: "Hard water on way to Sundubal." The boatmen are pulling "our Shikara" (our boat) up a difficult stretch of water called Munshi Bagh near Srinagar. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Ladakhis - Children with hen near the Sind River."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."Ladakhis - Children with hen near the Sind River."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00236.jpg
      Sind River, Sind, India - 01/01/1917: "Ladakhis - Children with hen near the Sind River." Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "A houseboat on the Dal Lake."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."A houseboat on the Dal Lake."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00145.jpg
      Dal Lake, Kashmir, India - 01/01/1917: "A houseboat on the Dal Lake." Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Hard work against the Stream - In the Shaidipur canal."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."Hard work against the Stream - In the Shaidipur canal."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00156.jpg
      Shaidipur, India - 01/01/1917: "Hard work against the Stream - In the Shaidipur canal." Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "The Mohmand Blockade - 1916-17."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1916 to 1917."The Mohmand Blockade - 1916-17."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1916 to 1917.
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    • ech00161.jpg
      India - 01/01/1916: "The Mohmand Blockade - 1916-17." Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1916 to 1917.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • A view of Jamrud Fort at the foot of the Khyber Pass.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.A view of Jamrud Fort at the foot of the Khyber Pass.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00123.jpg
      India - 01/01/1917: A view of Jamrud Fort at the foot of the Khyber Pass. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • A convey of armoured Rolls Royce vehicles climb through the Khyber Pass.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.A convey of armoured Rolls Royce vehicles climb through the Khyber Pass.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00146.jpg
      India - 01/01/1917: A convey of armoured Rolls Royce vehicles climb through the Khyber Pass. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • A view of the Shah Hamdan mosque on the bank of the Jhelum River in Srinagar. Also known as the Khanqah Mosque, it is one of the oldest Muslim shrines in Kashmir.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.A view of the Shah Hamdan mosque on the bank of the Jhelum River in Srinagar. Also known as the Khanqah Mosque, it is one of the oldest Muslim shrines in Kashmir.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00140.jpg
      Srinagar, India - 01/01/1917: A view of the Shah Hamdan mosque on the bank of the Jhelum River in Srinagar. Also known as the Khanqah Mosque, it is one of the oldest Muslim shrines in Kashmir. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Acrobats perform at Dagshai."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."Acrobats perform at Dagshai."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
    • Add to lightbox
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    • ech00233.jpg
      Dagshai, India - 01/01/1917: "Acrobats perform at Dagshai." Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • Two soldiers of the "Khyber Rifles" stand next to rope beds or "charpoys".

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.Two soldiers of the "Khyber Rifles" stand next to rope beds or "charpoys".

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00167.jpg
      Peshawar, India - 01/01/1917: Two soldiers of the "Khyber Rifles" stand next to rope beds or "charpoys". Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • A view of a canal near Srinagar.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.A view of a canal near Srinagar.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00206.jpg
      Dal Lake, Kashmir, India - 01/01/1917: A view of a canal near Srinagar. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • Captain "G.L. Groves and Karima - 12,000 ft" - "Gunga Glacier" is in the background.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.Captain "G.L. Groves and Karima - 12,000 ft" - "Gunga Glacier" is in the background.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
    • Add to lightbox
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    • ech00235.jpg
      Gunga Glacier, Kashmir, India - 01/01/1917: Captain "G.L. Groves and Karima - 12,000 ft" - "Gunga Glacier" is in the background. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • Believed to be showing the hill station of Shimla which was the summer capital of India under British rule.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.Believed to be showing the hill station of Shimla which was the summer capital of India under British rule.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00133.jpg
      Shimla, India - 01/01/1917: Believed to be showing the hill station of Shimla which was the summer capital of India under British rule. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "At the Kabuli Gate - Inside.  The Disturbances. Peshawar -1919."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

The day and month of this image within 1919 is unknown."At the Kabuli Gate - Inside.  The Disturbances. Peshawar -1919."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

The day and month of this image within 1919 is unknown.
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    • ech00130.jpg
      Peshawar, India - 01/01/1919: "At the Kabuli Gate - Inside. The Disturbances. Peshawar -1919." Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. The day and month of this image within 1919 is unknown.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • A convoy of Rolls Royce armoured cars believed to be near Peshawar.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.A convoy of Rolls Royce armoured cars believed to be near Peshawar.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00185.jpg
      Peshawar, India - 01/01/1918: A convoy of Rolls Royce armoured cars believed to be near Peshawar. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Steve O'Neill (left) and Farquar."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."Steve O'Neill (left) and Farquar."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00214.jpg
      India - 01/01/1917: "Steve O'Neill (left) and Farquar." Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • Two British Army officers at the tennis courts - Believed to be at Dagshai.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.Two British Army officers at the tennis courts - Believed to be at Dagshai.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00204.jpg
      Dagshai, India - 01/01/1917: Two British Army officers at the tennis courts - Believed to be at Dagshai. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • Many of the officers' wives and families spent the war with their husbands/fathers while they served in India. In the center are "Mrs Keyworth and Peter." 

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.Many of the officers' wives and families spent the war with their husbands/fathers while they served in India. In the center are "Mrs Keyworth and Peter." 

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00186.jpg
      India - 01/01/1917: Many of the officers' wives and families spent the war with their husbands/fathers while they served in India. In the center are "Mrs Keyworth and Peter." Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • Two British Army officers at the tennis courts - Dagshai.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.Two British Army officers at the tennis courts - Dagshai.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
    • Add to lightbox
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    • ech00127.jpg
      Dagshai, India - 01/01/1917: Two British Army officers at the tennis courts - Dagshai. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Flock of sheep passing over bridge Sonamarg." Sonamarg is a nearby hill-station.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."Flock of sheep passing over bridge Sonamarg." Sonamarg is a nearby hill-station.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00234.jpg
      Sonamarg, Kashmir, India - 01/01/1917: "Flock of sheep passing over bridge Sonamarg." Sonamarg is a nearby hill-station. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "G.L.G. E.G.F. and E.F.C."   Captains G.L. Groves and E.G. Frost with E.F Charlesworth on board their houseboat the Minnehaha, lake Dal.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."G.L.G. E.G.F. and E.F.C."   Captains G.L. Groves and E.G. Frost with E.F Charlesworth on board their houseboat the Minnehaha, lake Dal.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00237.jpg
      Dal Lake, Kashmir, India - 01/01/1917: "G.L.G. E.G.F. and E.F.C." Captains G.L. Groves and E.G. Frost with E.F Charlesworth on board their houseboat the Minnehaha, lake Dal. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "The roof of the Taj." A detail of the dome at the top of the Taj Mahal.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."The roof of the Taj." A detail of the dome at the top of the Taj Mahal.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00177.jpg
      Agra, India - 01/01/1917: "The roof of the Taj." A detail of the dome at the top of the Taj Mahal. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Old woman and children on Bund, a riverside scene."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."Old woman and children on Bund, a riverside scene."

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00202.jpg
      India - 01/01/1917: "Old woman and children on Bund, a riverside scene." Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Long Jump - Sports day at Dagshai - 1917"

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.

The day and month of this image within 1917 is unknown."Long Jump - Sports day at Dagshai - 1917"

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images.

The day and month of this image within 1917 is unknown.
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    • ech00217.jpg
      Dagshai, India - 01/01/1917: "Long Jump - Sports day at Dagshai - 1917" Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. The day and month of this image within 1917 is unknown.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Trestle bridge, first trestle." British soldiers practise their bridge-making skills.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."Trestle bridge, first trestle." British soldiers practise their bridge-making skills.

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense.  These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training".   From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front.  The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00166.jpg
      Srinagar, India - 01/01/1917: "Trestle bridge, first trestle." British soldiers practise their bridge-making skills. Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection
  • "Martyn on his bike in Lahore".

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919."Martyn on his bike in Lahore".

Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom."

With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe.

The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies."

E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks.   

On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. 

Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
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    • ech00198.jpg
      India - 01/01/1917: "Martyn on his bike in Lahore". Background to this image: With the threat of War looming in Europe, Edward Fitzgerald Charlesworth volunteered to join the Territorial Army that was being raised in Britain for coastal defense. These part-time soldiers trained at weekends and under an Act of Parliament no part of this force was to "be carried or ordered to go out of the United Kingdom." With the outbreak of the Great War in August 1914 Lord Kitchener, Secretary of State for War, asked for volunteers to serve abroad. The response from E.F. Charlesworth's Battalion, the 4th Queen's was reported to be "very satisfactory" and the volunteers were soon deployed to India to replace the regular British Army troops who were fast being transported to the battlefields of Europe. The 1st/4th Queen's arrived in Lucknow, via Bombay where they completed their "War Training". From published accounts there is no question that the soldiers posted to India during this period were craving for a call to the European front. The Times in 1916 was to write: "The men who have been sent to garrison the outposts of Empire would undoubtedly have chosen, if the choice had been theirs, to take their chances on the European battlefields with the Allies." E.F. Charlesworth recorded much of what he saw from the moment he boarded the ship in Southampton. His camera documented the life of British soldiers in India, their families, the local population, landscapes and landmarks. On his death these images were passed on to his Grandson Peter, who retains copyright to these rare historical images. Date of this image is estimated but lies within the period 1915 to 1919.
      Credit: E.F. Charlesworth / Peter Charlesworth Collection

 

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