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  • Images the life around Cambodia's garment industry, including living conditions and food available to workers on break outside of typical factories.

  • Living among the remnants of America's Vietnam-War-Era bombing campaign in Laos.

  • Travelling by train in Cambodia is a slow affair at best. It takes 14 hours to make the 300-kilometer trip west from the capital Phnom Penh to Battambang, if you’re lucky. Still the route less travelled for adventurous tourists, it remains the main mode of…

  • A look at how nutrition affects garment factory work in Cambodia.

  • Images from the Meng Ieng Group garment factory in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

  • The Mae Salong valley was settled by ethnic Chinese allied with the Kuomintang in the middle of the 20th Century. They had been chased out of China by Mao Tse-Tung's Communist forces. They brought their culture with them and created a small corner of…

  • The vast majority of Cambodian children work, a labor imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine…

  • Of all the innovations the French brought to Cambodia during their 90-year reign, perhaps the most enduring -- certainly the most ubiquitous -- was a simple loaf of bread. There are fewer elegant colonial-era buildings with each passing year, and French-language…

  • Since May 2006, more than 2,000 refugees from Myanmar have fled to Thailand, following a military offensive in their homeland. These new arrivals – mostly ethnic Karen – moved into Mae Ra Ma Luang and Mae La Oon refugee camps near the border, joining 140,000…

  • For decades, Cambodian law decreed that no building could be taller than the spires of the Royal Palace or the nearby Ounalom temple. Today construction cranes and high rise buildings tower above Phnom Penh’s narrow streets and alleys that are still speckled…

  • It’s the king of chilies; so hot that villagers in the highlands of Northeast India use it to keep wild elephants at bay and Indian defence researchers have experimented with them as a non-lethal way of quelling riots. About a thousand times hotter than your…

  • The Sandakphu Trail is West Bengal's most popular tourist trek, and the most crowded. The basic four-day walk (you can do in up to 2 weeks if you are so inclined) follows the Sandakphu ridge, squirming back and forth between India and Nepal, starting…

  • The Darjeeling Himalayan Railway, known as the Toy Train, covers 53 miles very, very slowly. It takes all day to make the trip between Siliguri on the Indian plains and Darjeeling in the Himalayan foothills. A taxi trip takes a quarter of the time and follows…

  • Three decades after US bombers retreated from the skies above Laos, unexploded bombs continue to reap a tragic harvest here. Cluster munitions are the worst offenders, spreading thousands of submunitions that bury themselves in the landscape maiming and killing…

  • Between 2,100 and 1,200 years ago, an ancient civilization buried its dead in more than 60 caves in a limestone mountain range in northern Thailand. Who were these people? Why were they buried in caves? Where did they go? No one knows, but their massive teak…

  • It took but 30 minutes for the man known as Comrade Duch to confess what Cambodians have waited 30 years to hear. "I am responsible for the crimes committed at S-21, especially the tortures and the executions of the people there,” said the 66-year-old…

  • For more than a decade, writer Karen Coates has reported on news and culture across Asia, and no matter the purpose of the interviews, sources invariably gravitate toward food - and health, and the intersection of the two. In Laos, she learns local insights:…

  • Morning jostles Assam, prodding people and animals to a new day. Parakeets shriek from treetops while villagers stoke their breakfast fires. Deer feed silently in the brush as storks and adjutants rise on warming air. The sun creeps slowly over fields and…

  • It’s that crazy time of year again, when throngs of Taoist devotees prepare to puncture themselves in every conceivable way, providing one of the planet’s more bizarre and gory celebrations of human spirituality and taking body piercing to new extremes.

  • Years of insurgent violence and government counter-violence have chased away thousands of people from Pattani in the South of Thailand. In spite of this, over the last several years, local entrepreneurs have constructed concrete apartment buildings and home…

  • Bako National Park, on the north-western edges of Malaysian Borneo, is a rare spot where to observe proboscis monkeys, so named for their protruding nose. But the park is also home to long-tailed macaques, silver-leafed langurs, flying lemurs, monitor lizards,…

  • For centuries, the Kelabit people have lived deep in Borneo's upland jungles, practicing animism and headhunting until missionaries converted them to Christianity after World War II. Before that, the Kelabits erected megaliths where ancestral remains…

  • Take a large wok, lots of heat, some prawns, garlic, lemon grass, lime leaves, fish sauce and a ton of chilies...oh yes and a sprinkling of coriander and you are well on your way to a Scent of Thai food. Photographer Jerry Redfern followed the aroma trail.

  • Imagine an airport on water, with the big birds flying overhead. Imagine a floating tarmac amid takeoffs, landings and mid-air acrobatics. Exchange the crushing roar of jet engines for the soft peeps of just-hatched chicks: That’s what it’s like in Prek Toal.…

  • Far from the tsunami-ravaged coastlines and hours from the war-troubled north, inland Sri Lanka is covered in tea. It’s a legacy of the British, who planted these hills with a cash crop that still defines the character of Sri Lankan hill country today. The…

  • Sri Lanka’s elephants were once royal property, and killing them was forbidden. Today somewhere between 2,500 and 6,000 wild elephants roam the small island country, where wild lands are shrinking due to an increasing human population. In recent years approximately…

  • The December 2004 tsunami killed 30,000 people in Sri Lanka, but twice that many have died in a war that just won’t end. For 20 years this teardrop shaped island, south of India, has suffered the tragedy of a bloody civil war. A 2002 cease-fire held a rocky…

  • Thousands of mysterious jars lie on the plains of northern Laos. The hidden menace of unexploded bombs dropped during the Vietnam War have kept most archeologists from exploring the area. But Belgian archeologist Julie Van den Bergh is working there with…

  • Pomp and ceremony in Cambodia's capital, Phnom Penh. Heralding the end of an era, former ballet dancer and Cambodian Ambassador to UNESCO Norodom Sihamoni ascended to Cambodia's throne . He takes the place of his father, Norodom Sihanouk, who for…

  • Eighty three year-old Cambodian Choun Nhiem is perhaps the world's best known sweeper. His image has become synomous with Angkor Wat. Though thousands may know his face and his hunched silhouette, few people know anything about Nhiem’s life.

  • Cambodia’s Cham Muslims are under increased scrutiny in the international war on terror. Last year, Southeast Asian terrorist Hambali hid unknown in their midst for months and several teachers were arrested at an Islamic institute in the countryside. The…

  • Sambo the elephant is a Phnom Penh idol. Tourists adore her and Cambodians believe she is endowed with mystical powers. But she suffers from urban life. She lives near a squatter camp in a field full of garbage and excrement. Last year someone cut off the…

  • Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao has recently ordered the suspension of plans for a series of dams on the pristine Nujiang River, one of only two undammed rivers in China. He said that such a controversial large dam plan should be "seriously reviewed and decided…

  • Long-distance runner Mok Bonthoeun is Cambodia's only Olympic hope. But with a couple of frayed pairs of running shoes and a bare-bones training programme, Mok's hardest race is against his own poverty.

  • American physician, Dr. Dan Murphy, braved the turmoil of East Timor's transition to independence and now says he will stay indefinitely "doing what he's gotta do".He works in a cramped examination room at the Bairo Pite Clinic. He often…

  • Mob justice is played out on the streets of the Cambodian capital, Phnom Penh. A robber is caught and beaten as the police stand by.


 

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