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Wildlife
Jerry Redfern
Animal photos (mostly in the wild) from across the US and Southeast Asia.

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  • An American Bison (Bison bison) at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge poses in front of the Denver skyline. The Arsenal produced chemical weapons until the end of WWII. Later, Shell Oil leased part of the area where they produced herbicides and pesticides until 1982. Clean-up operations began in 1987 and lasted until 2010. The refuge is home to 330 animal species and is right on the doorstep of Denver.An American Bison (Bison bison) at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge poses in front of the Denver skyline. The Arsenal produced chemical weapons until the end of WWII. Later, Shell Oil leased part of the area where they produced herbicides and pesticides until 1982. Clean-up operations began in 1987 and lasted until 2010. The refuge is home to 330 animal species and is right on the doorstep of Denver.
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      Rocky Mountain Arsenal National , Denver, Colorado, United States - 08/03/2013: An American Bison (Bison bison) at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge poses in front of the Denver skyline. The Arsenal produced chemical weapons until the end of WWII. Later, Shell Oil leased part of the area where they produced herbicides and pesticides until 1982. Clean-up operations began in 1987 and lasted until 2010. The refuge is home to 330 animal species and is right on the doorstep of Denver.
      Credit: ©Jerry Redfern
  • A mother and child Great One-horned Rhinoceros (Indian rhinoceros, Rhinoceros unicornis) walk through a stand of two-meter-tall elephant grass in Kaziranga National Park. The rhino is an endangered species as noted on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. A village home just outside the boundary of the park can be seen in the background. Kaziranga National Park is the oldest national park in the northeast Indian state of Assam. It was created a century ago as a forest reserve by British Viceroy Lord Curzon at the behest of his wife, to protect the Greater One-Horned Rhinoceros. Today the park is home to many endangered animals, including the rhino, tigers, elephants, wild buffalo, swamp deer and numerous bird species.
A mother and child Great One-horned Rhinoceros (Indian rhinoceros, Rhinoceros unicornis) walk through a stand of two-meter-tall elephant grass in Kaziranga National Park. The rhino is an endangered species as noted on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. A village home just outside the boundary of the park can be seen in the background. Kaziranga National Park is the oldest national park in the northeast Indian state of Assam. It was created a century ago as a forest reserve by British Viceroy Lord Curzon at the behest of his wife, to protect the Greater One-Horned Rhinoceros. Today the park is home to many endangered animals, including the rhino, tigers, elephants, wild buffalo, swamp deer and numerous bird species.
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      Kaziranga National Park, Assam, India - 24/11/2007: A mother and child Great One-horned Rhinoceros (Indian rhinoceros, Rhinoceros unicornis) walk through a stand of two-meter-tall elephant grass in Kaziranga National Park. The rhino is an endangered species as noted on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. A village home just outside the boundary of the park can be seen in the background. Kaziranga National Park is the oldest national park in the northeast Indian state of Assam. It was created a century ago as a forest reserve by British Viceroy Lord Curzon at the behest of his wife, to protect the Greater One-Horned Rhinoceros. Today the park is home to many endangered animals, including the rhino, tigers, elephants, wild buffalo, swamp deer and numerous bird species.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Sandhill cranes (grus canedensis), stand in the middle of the Rio Grande River near Los Lunas, New Mexico in the pre-dawn morning.Sandhill cranes (grus canedensis), stand in the middle of the Rio Grande River near Los Lunas, New Mexico in the pre-dawn morning.
  • A Brahminy Kite (Haliastur indus) flies low over Kaziranga National Park as night falls. Kaziranga National Park is the oldest national park in the northeast Indian state of Assam. It was created a century ago as a forest reserve by British Viceroy Lord Curzon at the behest of his wife, to protect the Greater One-Horned Rhinoceros. Today the park is home to many endangered animals, including the rhino, tigers, elephants, wild buffalo, swamp deer and numerous bird species.
A Brahminy Kite (Haliastur indus) flies low over Kaziranga National Park as night falls. Kaziranga National Park is the oldest national park in the northeast Indian state of Assam. It was created a century ago as a forest reserve by British Viceroy Lord Curzon at the behest of his wife, to protect the Greater One-Horned Rhinoceros. Today the park is home to many endangered animals, including the rhino, tigers, elephants, wild buffalo, swamp deer and numerous bird species.
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      Kaziranga National Park, Assam, India - 22/11/2007: A Brahminy Kite (Haliastur indus) flies low over Kaziranga National Park as night falls. Kaziranga National Park is the oldest national park in the northeast Indian state of Assam. It was created a century ago as a forest reserve by British Viceroy Lord Curzon at the behest of his wife, to protect the Greater One-Horned Rhinoceros. Today the park is home to many endangered animals, including the rhino, tigers, elephants, wild buffalo, swamp deer and numerous bird species.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • A bee covered in pollen pollinates a cactus flower in New MexicoA bee covered in pollen pollinates a cactus flower in New Mexico
  • A bee-eater perches in a twig over a trapeang near Tmatboey.   Two of the world's rarest birds - the giant ibis and the white-shouldered ibis - make their home near Tmatboey, in north central Cambodia. Both critically endangered species nest and feed in the surrounding deciduous dipterocarp forest, a regional rarity. Once widespread across Southeast Asia, both giant and white-shouldered ibises have suffered a century of hunting, habitat loss and deforestation. Perhaps as few as 250 remain of each species. Tmatboey is the only protected nesting site for the white-shouldered ibis, and one of the few places in the world to spot the giant ibis, Cambodia's national bird. When the dry season hits its peak, February through April, the birds congregate to feed at ancient man-made reservoirs called trapeangs, which date to the Angkor era 600-1,200 years ago. Since the Tmatboey Ibis Project was established by the US-based Wildlife Conservation Society in 2005, villagers enforce a local code of conduct prohibiting hunting and preserving feeding and nesting areas. Tmatboey is a veritable paradise for birds and the people who love them. It's also the closest wilderness to the Angkor temples, which attracted more than 1.5 million visitors in 2006. Just three hours by car from Siem Reap, the Kulen Promtep Wildlife Sanctuary surrounds Tmatboey, where the ibises overlap with 16 woodpecker species, greater and lesser adjutants, sarus cranes, green peafowl, black-necked storks, wooly-necked storks, greater spotted eagles, grey-headed fish eagles, white-rumped falcons, pale-capped pigeons, Asian golden weavers, Alexandrine parakeets and rufous-winged buzzards.A bee-eater perches in a twig over a trapeang near Tmatboey.   Two of the world's rarest birds - the giant ibis and the white-shouldered ibis - make their home near Tmatboey, in north central Cambodia. Both critically endangered species nest and feed in the surrounding deciduous dipterocarp forest, a regional rarity. Once widespread across Southeast Asia, both giant and white-shouldered ibises have suffered a century of hunting, habitat loss and deforestation. Perhaps as few as 250 remain of each species. Tmatboey is the only protected nesting site for the white-shouldered ibis, and one of the few places in the world to spot the giant ibis, Cambodia's national bird. When the dry season hits its peak, February through April, the birds congregate to feed at ancient man-made reservoirs called trapeangs, which date to the Angkor era 600-1,200 years ago. Since the Tmatboey Ibis Project was established by the US-based Wildlife Conservation Society in 2005, villagers enforce a local code of conduct prohibiting hunting and preserving feeding and nesting areas. Tmatboey is a veritable paradise for birds and the people who love them. It's also the closest wilderness to the Angkor temples, which attracted more than 1.5 million visitors in 2006. Just three hours by car from Siem Reap, the Kulen Promtep Wildlife Sanctuary surrounds Tmatboey, where the ibises overlap with 16 woodpecker species, greater and lesser adjutants, sarus cranes, green peafowl, black-necked storks, wooly-necked storks, greater spotted eagles, grey-headed fish eagles, white-rumped falcons, pale-capped pigeons, Asian golden weavers, Alexandrine parakeets and rufous-winged buzzards.
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    • View more from 'Birds of a Feather'
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      Tmatboey, Preah Vihear, Cambodia - 24/02/2007: A bee-eater perches in a twig over a trapeang near Tmatboey. Two of the world's rarest birds - the giant ibis and the white-shouldered ibis - make their home near Tmatboey, in north central Cambodia. Both critically endangered species nest and feed in the surrounding deciduous dipterocarp forest, a regional rarity. Once widespread across Southeast Asia, both giant and white-shouldered ibises have suffered a century of hunting, habitat loss and deforestation. Perhaps as few as 250 remain of each species. Tmatboey is the only protected nesting site for the white-shouldered ibis, and one of the few places in the world to spot the giant ibis, Cambodia's national bird. When the dry season hits its peak, February through April, the birds congregate to feed at ancient man-made reservoirs called trapeangs, which date to the Angkor era 600-1,200 years ago. Since the Tmatboey Ibis Project was established by the US-based Wildlife Conservation Society in 2005, villagers enforce a local code of conduct prohibiting hunting and preserving feeding and nesting areas. Tmatboey is a veritable paradise for birds and the people who love them. It's also the closest wilderness to the Angkor temples, which attracted more than 1.5 million visitors in 2006. Just three hours by car from Siem Reap, the Kulen Promtep Wildlife Sanctuary surrounds Tmatboey, where the ibises overlap with 16 woodpecker species, greater and lesser adjutants, sarus cranes, green peafowl, black-necked storks, wooly-necked storks, greater spotted eagles, grey-headed fish eagles, white-rumped falcons, pale-capped pigeons, Asian golden weavers, Alexandrine parakeets and rufous-winged buzzards.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), feeding during a snow storm in southern Wisconsin. The population has been hard hit by chronic wasting disease, a form of spongiform encephalopathy.White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), feeding during a snow storm in southern Wisconsin. The population has been hard hit by chronic wasting disease, a form of spongiform encephalopathy.
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      Brookfield, Wisconsin, United States - 26/12/2009: White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), feeding during a snow storm in southern Wisconsin. The population has been hard hit by chronic wasting disease, a form of spongiform encephalopathy.
      Credit: ©Jerry Redfern
  • An endangered Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens) eats bamboo shoots at the Darjeeling Zoo. Formally known as the Padmaja Naidu Himalayan Zoological Park, the Darjeeling Zoo was opened in 1958 to preserve and study Himalayan fauna in the rapidly developing region.An endangered Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens) eats bamboo shoots at the Darjeeling Zoo. Formally known as the Padmaja Naidu Himalayan Zoological Park, the Darjeeling Zoo was opened in 1958 to preserve and study Himalayan fauna in the rapidly developing region.
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      Darjeeling, West Bengal, India - 10/12/2007: An endangered Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens) eats bamboo shoots at the Darjeeling Zoo. Formally known as the Padmaja Naidu Himalayan Zoological Park, the Darjeeling Zoo was opened in 1958 to preserve and study Himalayan fauna in the rapidly developing region.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • White-winged Dove (Zenaida asiatica) perching in a tree in New Mexico.White-winged Dove (Zenaida asiatica) perching in a tree in New Mexico.
  • A female Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) sits on a tree branch during a snow storm in southern Wisconsin.A female Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) sits on a tree branch during a snow storm in southern Wisconsin.
  • A juvenile Wagler's pit viper (Tropidolaemus wagleri) perches in a small tree near the entrance of Bako National Park. They are the one venomous snake found in the park.A juvenile Wagler's pit viper (Tropidolaemus wagleri) perches in a small tree near the entrance of Bako National Park. They are the one venomous snake found in the park.
  • An adult female Great One-horned Rhinoceros (Indian rhinoceros, Rhinoceros unicornis) feeds on elephant grass in Kaziranga National Park. The rhino is an endangered species as noted on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Kaziranga National Park is the oldest national park in the northeast Indian state of Assam. It was created a century ago as a forest reserve by British Viceroy Lord Curzon at the behest of his wife, to protect the Greater One-Horned Rhinoceros. Today the park is home to many endangered animals, including the rhino, tigers, elephants, wild buffalo, swamp deer and numerous bird species.
An adult female Great One-horned Rhinoceros (Indian rhinoceros, Rhinoceros unicornis) feeds on elephant grass in Kaziranga National Park. The rhino is an endangered species as noted on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Kaziranga National Park is the oldest national park in the northeast Indian state of Assam. It was created a century ago as a forest reserve by British Viceroy Lord Curzon at the behest of his wife, to protect the Greater One-Horned Rhinoceros. Today the park is home to many endangered animals, including the rhino, tigers, elephants, wild buffalo, swamp deer and numerous bird species.
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    • View more... Kaziranga Wild at Heart
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      Kaziranga National Park, Assam, India - 24/11/2007: An adult female Great One-horned Rhinoceros (Indian rhinoceros, Rhinoceros unicornis) feeds on elephant grass in Kaziranga National Park. The rhino is an endangered species as noted on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Kaziranga National Park is the oldest national park in the northeast Indian state of Assam. It was created a century ago as a forest reserve by British Viceroy Lord Curzon at the behest of his wife, to protect the Greater One-Horned Rhinoceros. Today the park is home to many endangered animals, including the rhino, tigers, elephants, wild buffalo, swamp deer and numerous bird species.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Mother and child Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus) feed on elephant grass along a creek. Kaziranga National Park is the oldest national park in the northeast Indian state of Assam. It was created a century ago as a forest reserve by British Viceroy Lord Curzon at the behest of his wife, to protect the Greater One-Horned Rhinoceros. Today the park is home to many endangered animals, including the rhino, tigers, elephants, wild buffalo, swamp deer and numerous bird species.
Mother and child Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus) feed on elephant grass along a creek. Kaziranga National Park is the oldest national park in the northeast Indian state of Assam. It was created a century ago as a forest reserve by British Viceroy Lord Curzon at the behest of his wife, to protect the Greater One-Horned Rhinoceros. Today the park is home to many endangered animals, including the rhino, tigers, elephants, wild buffalo, swamp deer and numerous bird species.
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      Kaziranga National Park, Assam, India - 23/11/2007: Mother and child Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus) feed on elephant grass along a creek. Kaziranga National Park is the oldest national park in the northeast Indian state of Assam. It was created a century ago as a forest reserve by British Viceroy Lord Curzon at the behest of his wife, to protect the Greater One-Horned Rhinoceros. Today the park is home to many endangered animals, including the rhino, tigers, elephants, wild buffalo, swamp deer and numerous bird species.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • A Colugo or Sunda Flying Lemur, also known as a Malayan Flying Lemur (Galeopterus variegatus) photographed in the Bako National Park. The flying lemur is not actually a lemur, instead belonging to its own family of mammals. The shy, nocturnal herbivore also does not actually fly, instead gliding between trees on large membranes that stretch between its front and hind legs.A Colugo or Sunda Flying Lemur, also known as a Malayan Flying Lemur (Galeopterus variegatus) photographed in the Bako National Park. The flying lemur is not actually a lemur, instead belonging to its own family of mammals. The shy, nocturnal herbivore also does not actually fly, instead gliding between trees on large membranes that stretch between its front and hind legs.
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      Sarawak, Malaysia - 08/07/2006: A Colugo or Sunda Flying Lemur, also known as a Malayan Flying Lemur (Galeopterus variegatus) photographed in the Bako National Park. The flying lemur is not actually a lemur, instead belonging to its own family of mammals. The shy, nocturnal herbivore also does not actually fly, instead gliding between trees on large membranes that stretch between its front and hind legs.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Female proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) cross a mudflat covered by the incoming tide in Bako National Park. They will occasionally run on their hind legs while crossing shallow water. Approximately 275 monkeys live in the park, one of the few remaining places in Borneo to find them. They feed almost exclusively on mangrove leaves.  This particular group of proboscis monkeys is in further danger because its food supply - the mangrove trees on which it feeds - is dying off and not regenerating for reasons that are not entirely clear to park rangers. The probiscis monkey is endemic to the coastal mangroves, swamps and forests of Borneo. Only about 7,000 are though to remain on the island, approximately 1,000 of them in Sarawak.Female proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) cross a mudflat covered by the incoming tide in Bako National Park. They will occasionally run on their hind legs while crossing shallow water. Approximately 275 monkeys live in the park, one of the few remaining places in Borneo to find them. They feed almost exclusively on mangrove leaves.  This particular group of proboscis monkeys is in further danger because its food supply - the mangrove trees on which it feeds - is dying off and not regenerating for reasons that are not entirely clear to park rangers. The probiscis monkey is endemic to the coastal mangroves, swamps and forests of Borneo. Only about 7,000 are though to remain on the island, approximately 1,000 of them in Sarawak.
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    • View more... Big Nose Stars in Bako Wild at Heart
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      Sarawak, Malaysia - 08/07/2006: Female proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) cross a mudflat covered by the incoming tide in Bako National Park. They will occasionally run on their hind legs while crossing shallow water. Approximately 275 monkeys live in the park, one of the few remaining places in Borneo to find them. They feed almost exclusively on mangrove leaves. This particular group of proboscis monkeys is in further danger because its food supply - the mangrove trees on which it feeds - is dying off and not regenerating for reasons that are not entirely clear to park rangers. The probiscis monkey is endemic to the coastal mangroves, swamps and forests of Borneo. Only about 7,000 are though to remain on the island, approximately 1,000 of them in Sarawak.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • A male proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) feeds on mangrove tree leaves in Bako National Park. Approximately 275 live in the park, one of the few remaining places in Borneo to find these endangered monkeys, which feed almost exclusively on mangrove leaves. This particular group of proboscis monkeys is in further danger because its food supply - the mangrove trees on which it feeds - is dying off and not regenerating for reasons that are not entirely clear to park rangers. The probiscis monkey is endemic to the coastal mangroves, swamps and forests of Borneo. Only about 7,000 are though to remain on the island, approximately 1,000 of them in Sarawak.A male proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) feeds on mangrove tree leaves in Bako National Park. Approximately 275 live in the park, one of the few remaining places in Borneo to find these endangered monkeys, which feed almost exclusively on mangrove leaves. This particular group of proboscis monkeys is in further danger because its food supply - the mangrove trees on which it feeds - is dying off and not regenerating for reasons that are not entirely clear to park rangers. The probiscis monkey is endemic to the coastal mangroves, swamps and forests of Borneo. Only about 7,000 are though to remain on the island, approximately 1,000 of them in Sarawak.
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      Sarawak, Malaysia - 08/07/2006: A male proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) feeds on mangrove tree leaves in Bako National Park. Approximately 275 live in the park, one of the few remaining places in Borneo to find these endangered monkeys, which feed almost exclusively on mangrove leaves. This particular group of proboscis monkeys is in further danger because its food supply - the mangrove trees on which it feeds - is dying off and not regenerating for reasons that are not entirely clear to park rangers. The probiscis monkey is endemic to the coastal mangroves, swamps and forests of Borneo. Only about 7,000 are though to remain on the island, approximately 1,000 of them in Sarawak.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • A female proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) sits on mangrove tree roots (Avicennia sp.) in a mudflat in Bako National Park. Approximately 275 monkeys live in the park, one of the few remaining places in Borneo to find them. They feed almost exclusively on mangrove leaves. These tree roots branch upward from main roots that grow below the surface and aid absorption of oxygen. The mud that mangrove trees grow in is extremely low in oxygen and other dissolved gasses. This particular group of proboscis monkeys is in further danger because its food supply - the mangrove trees on which it feeds - is dying off and not regenerating for reasons that are not entirely clear to park rangers. The probiscis monkey is endemic to the coastal mangroves, swamps and forests of Borneo. Only about 7,000 are though to remain on the island, approximately 1,000 of them in Sarawak.A female proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) sits on mangrove tree roots (Avicennia sp.) in a mudflat in Bako National Park. Approximately 275 monkeys live in the park, one of the few remaining places in Borneo to find them. They feed almost exclusively on mangrove leaves. These tree roots branch upward from main roots that grow below the surface and aid absorption of oxygen. The mud that mangrove trees grow in is extremely low in oxygen and other dissolved gasses. This particular group of proboscis monkeys is in further danger because its food supply - the mangrove trees on which it feeds - is dying off and not regenerating for reasons that are not entirely clear to park rangers. The probiscis monkey is endemic to the coastal mangroves, swamps and forests of Borneo. Only about 7,000 are though to remain on the island, approximately 1,000 of them in Sarawak.
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      Sarawak, Malaysia - 14/10/2007: A female proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) sits on mangrove tree roots (Avicennia sp.) in a mudflat in Bako National Park. Approximately 275 monkeys live in the park, one of the few remaining places in Borneo to find them. They feed almost exclusively on mangrove leaves. These tree roots branch upward from main roots that grow below the surface and aid absorption of oxygen. The mud that mangrove trees grow in is extremely low in oxygen and other dissolved gasses. This particular group of proboscis monkeys is in further danger because its food supply - the mangrove trees on which it feeds - is dying off and not regenerating for reasons that are not entirely clear to park rangers. The probiscis monkey is endemic to the coastal mangroves, swamps and forests of Borneo. Only about 7,000 are though to remain on the island, approximately 1,000 of them in Sarawak.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • A Batagur baska is measured before its release.\Batagur baska turtles were long thought extinct in Cambodia. But in 2000 females once again laid eggs along the Kaong river, leading to a project by the Wildlife Conservation Society and the Cambodian Department of Fisheries to protect and revive this historic species. Historically, the turtles were the property of Cambodian kings, who held the sole right to their tasty flesh and eggs. But over-fishing and destructive fishing practices in the 70s, 80s and 90s nearly wiped out this turtle from its native habitat.\In an interesting twist, WCS hired former Khmer Rouge soldiers living in the area to guard the remote turtle nests from both human and animal predators, giving them the best jobs they've ever had.A Batagur baska is measured before its release.\Batagur baska turtles were long thought extinct in Cambodia. But in 2000 females once again laid eggs along the Kaong river, leading to a project by the Wildlife Conservation Society and the Cambodian Department of Fisheries to protect and revive this historic species. Historically, the turtles were the property of Cambodian kings, who held the sole right to their tasty flesh and eggs. But over-fishing and destructive fishing practices in the 70s, 80s and 90s nearly wiped out this turtle from its native habitat.\In an interesting twist, WCS hired former Khmer Rouge soldiers living in the area to guard the remote turtle nests from both human and animal predators, giving them the best jobs they've ever had.
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      Koh Kong, Cambodia - 01/04/2002: A Batagur baska is measured before its release.\Batagur baska turtles were long thought extinct in Cambodia. But in 2000 females once again laid eggs along the Kaong river, leading to a project by the Wildlife Conservation Society and the Cambodian Department of Fisheries to protect and revive this historic species. Historically, the turtles were the property of Cambodian kings, who held the sole right to their tasty flesh and eggs. But over-fishing and destructive fishing practices in the 70s, 80s and 90s nearly wiped out this turtle from its native habitat.\In an interesting twist, WCS hired former Khmer Rouge soldiers living in the area to guard the remote turtle nests from both human and animal predators, giving them the best jobs they've ever had.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Batagur baska hatchlings try to climb out of the rice pots they were kept in after they were dug up from their nests.\Batagur baska turtles were long thought extinct in Cambodia. But in 2000 females once again laid eggs along the Kaong river, leading to a project by the Wildlife Conservation Society and the Cambodian Department of Fisheries to protect and revive this historic species. Historically, the turtles were the property of Cambodian kings, who held the sole right to their tasty flesh and eggs. But over-fishing and destructive fishing practices in the 70s, 80s and 90s nearly wiped out this turtle from its native habitat.\In an interesting twist, WCS hired former Khmer Rouge soldiers living in the area to guard the remote turtle nests from both human and animal predators, giving them the best jobs they've ever had.Batagur baska hatchlings try to climb out of the rice pots they were kept in after they were dug up from their nests.\Batagur baska turtles were long thought extinct in Cambodia. But in 2000 females once again laid eggs along the Kaong river, leading to a project by the Wildlife Conservation Society and the Cambodian Department of Fisheries to protect and revive this historic species. Historically, the turtles were the property of Cambodian kings, who held the sole right to their tasty flesh and eggs. But over-fishing and destructive fishing practices in the 70s, 80s and 90s nearly wiped out this turtle from its native habitat.\In an interesting twist, WCS hired former Khmer Rouge soldiers living in the area to guard the remote turtle nests from both human and animal predators, giving them the best jobs they've ever had.
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      Koh Kong, Cambodia - 01/04/2002: Batagur baska hatchlings try to climb out of the rice pots they were kept in after they were dug up from their nests.\Batagur baska turtles were long thought extinct in Cambodia. But in 2000 females once again laid eggs along the Kaong river, leading to a project by the Wildlife Conservation Society and the Cambodian Department of Fisheries to protect and revive this historic species. Historically, the turtles were the property of Cambodian kings, who held the sole right to their tasty flesh and eggs. But over-fishing and destructive fishing practices in the 70s, 80s and 90s nearly wiped out this turtle from its native habitat.\In an interesting twist, WCS hired former Khmer Rouge soldiers living in the area to guard the remote turtle nests from both human and animal predators, giving them the best jobs they've ever had.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • An infant silvered leaf monkey - or silver langur - (Trachypithecus cristatus) sits in the high branches of a tree in Bako National Park. Infants have the distinctive orange coat for the first three months of their lives. The arboreal monkeys spend very little time on the ground. They are listed as "near threatened" by the IUCN.An infant silvered leaf monkey - or silver langur - (Trachypithecus cristatus) sits in the high branches of a tree in Bako National Park. Infants have the distinctive orange coat for the first three months of their lives. The arboreal monkeys spend very little time on the ground. They are listed as "near threatened" by the IUCN.
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      Bako National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia - 07/07/2006: An infant silvered leaf monkey - or silver langur - (Trachypithecus cristatus) sits in the high branches of a tree in Bako National Park. Infants have the distinctive orange coat for the first three months of their lives. The arboreal monkeys spend very little time on the ground. They are listed as "near threatened" by the IUCN.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • A silvered leaf monkey - or silver langur - (Trachypithecus cristatus) sits in the high branches of a tree in Bako National Park. The arboreal monkeys spend very little time on the ground. They are listed as "near threatened" by the IUCN.A silvered leaf monkey - or silver langur - (Trachypithecus cristatus) sits in the high branches of a tree in Bako National Park. The arboreal monkeys spend very little time on the ground. They are listed as "near threatened" by the IUCN.
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      Bako National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia - 07/07/2006: A silvered leaf monkey - or silver langur - (Trachypithecus cristatus) sits in the high branches of a tree in Bako National Park. The arboreal monkeys spend very little time on the ground. They are listed as "near threatened" by the IUCN.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • A wild elephant scavenges in a garbage dump on the edge of Trincomalee, a large port town on the east coast of Sri Lanka. It is not uncommon to see wild elephants in more remote sections of the country.

Wild elephants frighten Sri Lankans, who often believe they are unpredictable, dangerous and violent animals.A wild elephant scavenges in a garbage dump on the edge of Trincomalee, a large port town on the east coast of Sri Lanka. It is not uncommon to see wild elephants in more remote sections of the country.

Wild elephants frighten Sri Lankans, who often believe they are unpredictable, dangerous and violent animals.
  • A stuffed Red Muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak) mildews in a restaurant window in the old town of Hanoi. Much of Vietnam's rarer wildlife has been hunted, nearly to the point of extinction, to feed the country's growing population and satisfy the  hunger for exotic meats.A stuffed Red Muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak) mildews in a restaurant window in the old town of Hanoi. Much of Vietnam's rarer wildlife has been hunted, nearly to the point of extinction, to feed the country's growing population and satisfy the  hunger for exotic meats.
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      Hanoi, Hanoi, Vietnam - 01/03/1999: A stuffed Red Muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak) mildews in a restaurant window in the old town of Hanoi. Much of Vietnam's rarer wildlife has been hunted, nearly to the point of extinction, to feed the country's growing population and satisfy the hunger for exotic meats.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Dozens of dried squirrels await buyers at the central market in Kratie town. The eviscerated and desiccated rodents are used in traditional medicines.Dozens of dried squirrels await buyers at the central market in Kratie town. The eviscerated and desiccated rodents are used in traditional medicines.
  • An ethnic Vietnamese man displays a live python poached from Virochey National Park. The man buys snakes like this from poachers, and trades them down the Mekong River to Phnom Penh where they end up in Chinese medicine shops and restaurants.An ethnic Vietnamese man displays a live python poached from Virochey National Park. The man buys snakes like this from poachers, and trades them down the Mekong River to Phnom Penh where they end up in Chinese medicine shops and restaurants.
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      Ban Lung, Rattanakiri, Cambodia - 01/08/2001: An ethnic Vietnamese man displays a live python poached from Virochey National Park. The man buys snakes like this from poachers, and trades them down the Mekong River to Phnom Penh where they end up in Chinese medicine shops and restaurants.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • A man wearing a Mickey Mouse t-shirt offers up a leopard pelt for sale on the streets of Mandalay.A man wearing a Mickey Mouse t-shirt offers up a leopard pelt for sale on the streets of Mandalay.

 

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