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Portraits
Jerry Redfern

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  • Portrait of an elderly Lahu Woman poses for a portrait at her home in rural Shan State, Myanmar.Portrait of an elderly Lahu Woman poses for a portrait at her home in rural Shan State, Myanmar.
  • Portrait of an Akha woman at a market in Kengtung, Shan State, Myanmar. The silver jewelry she wears is a large part of her family wealth.Portrait of an Akha woman at a market in Kengtung, Shan State, Myanmar. The silver jewelry she wears is a large part of her family wealth.
  • Portrait of a young girl with thanaka paste on her cheeks at a weekly market outside Kengtung, Shan State, Myanmar.Portrait of a young girl with thanaka paste on her cheeks at a weekly market outside Kengtung, Shan State, Myanmar.
  • Portrait of a jeweler and watch repairman  in his shop in downtown Yangon, Myanmar.Portrait of a jeweler and watch repairman  in his shop in downtown Yangon, Myanmar.
  • A river taxi rower crosses one of the branches of the Ayerwaddy River in Pathein in the evening.A river taxi rower crosses one of the branches of the Ayerwaddy River in Pathein in the evening.
  • Mau, 15, has fished every day for his family for the last three or four years, he cannot remember exactly how long. He goes to school in the afternoons. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Mau, 15, has fished every day for his family for the last three or four years, he cannot remember exactly how long. He goes to school in the afternoons. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Siem Reap, Siem Reap, Cambodia - 28/11/2006: Mau, 15, has fished every day for his family for the last three or four years, he cannot remember exactly how long. He goes to school in the afternoons. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Sol Moum, 12, has been in charge of her family's laundry for the last few years. She washes it in the Mekong river, a few hundred meters from her home. She is also responsible for her younger brother Sol Pii (hiding behind her). Sol Moum goes to school when it is open, and also cooks and cleans the house for her family. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Sol Moum, 12, has been in charge of her family's laundry for the last few years. She washes it in the Mekong river, a few hundred meters from her home. She is also responsible for her younger brother Sol Pii (hiding behind her). Sol Moum goes to school when it is open, and also cooks and cleans the house for her family. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Kandal, Cambodia - 24/08/2006: Sol Moum, 12, has been in charge of her family's laundry for the last few years. She washes it in the Mekong river, a few hundred meters from her home. She is also responsible for her younger brother Sol Pii (hiding behind her). Sol Moum goes to school when it is open, and also cooks and cleans the house for her family. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Wan Sao, 12, looks for collectables atop the Steung Meanchey dump on the edge of Phnom Penh. She has done this every day for the last two years since coming from Prey Veng Province with her father and sister. "I stopped going to school," she says. "I'm too busy working." She makes the equivalent of $0.50 a day. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Wan Sao, 12, looks for collectables atop the Steung Meanchey dump on the edge of Phnom Penh. She has done this every day for the last two years since coming from Prey Veng Province with her father and sister. "I stopped going to school," she says. "I'm too busy working." She makes the equivalent of $0.50 a day. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 09/04/2006: Wan Sao, 12, looks for collectables atop the Steung Meanchey dump on the edge of Phnom Penh. She has done this every day for the last two years since coming from Prey Veng Province with her father and sister. "I stopped going to school," she says. "I'm too busy working." She makes the equivalent of $0.50 a day. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Tok, 14, rakes salt crystals while working with his mother and young sister in a salt field. Their family came from Svay Rieng province for the seasonal work. They work barefoot all day in the sun raking and hauling the sharp crystals in hot water. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Tok, 14, rakes salt crystals while working with his mother and young sister in a salt field. Their family came from Svay Rieng province for the seasonal work. They work barefoot all day in the sun raking and hauling the sharp crystals in hot water. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Kampot, Kampot, Cambodia - 04/04/2006: Tok, 14, rakes salt crystals while working with his mother and young sister in a salt field. Their family came from Svay Rieng province for the seasonal work. They work barefoot all day in the sun raking and hauling the sharp crystals in hot water. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Ieng, 13, moved with her family from Svay Rieng province one year ago to work in this brick factory. She works eight hours a day and the $30 a month she makes goes to her parents. She does not go to school. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Ieng, 13, moved with her family from Svay Rieng province one year ago to work in this brick factory. She works eight hours a day and the $30 a month she makes goes to her parents. She does not go to school. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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    • jre04544.jpg
      Siem Reap, Cambodia - 29/11/2006: Ieng, 13, moved with her family from Svay Rieng province one year ago to work in this brick factory. She works eight hours a day and the $30 a month she makes goes to her parents. She does not go to school. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Sy Ha, 13, sells balloons in front of the Royal Palace. He moved with his family to Phnom Penh 10 years earlier from Svay Rieng province. He makes 10,000 - 20,000 Riel a day (US $2.50 - $5), which he takes home for his family. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Sy Ha, 13, sells balloons in front of the Royal Palace. He moved with his family to Phnom Penh 10 years earlier from Svay Rieng province. He makes 10,000 - 20,000 Riel a day (US $2.50 - $5), which he takes home for his family. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 16/12/2005: Sy Ha, 13, sells balloons in front of the Royal Palace. He moved with his family to Phnom Penh 10 years earlier from Svay Rieng province. He makes 10,000 - 20,000 Riel a day (US $2.50 - $5), which he takes home for his family. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Portrait of a Buddhist monk heading off to the bathroom in the living quarters of one of the temples in the monastery district of Mandalay, Myanmar. Portrait of a Buddhist monk heading off to the bathroom in the living quarters of one of the temples in the monastery district of Mandalay, Myanmar.
  • Youk Chhang, in his office at the Documentation Center of Cambodia, stands in front of portraits of the chief guards at Tuol Sleng, a Khmer Rouge torture center in Phnom Penh.

As the Center's Director, he has spent his adult life compiling information to use against Khmer Rouge leaders when (and if) they are finally brought to trial for crimes against humanity.

 Approximately two million people died during the bloody, xenophobic Khmer Rouge regime which ran from 1975 to 1979.Youk Chhang, in his office at the Documentation Center of Cambodia, stands in front of portraits of the chief guards at Tuol Sleng, a Khmer Rouge torture center in Phnom Penh.

As the Center's Director, he has spent his adult life compiling information to use against Khmer Rouge leaders when (and if) they are finally brought to trial for crimes against humanity.

 Approximately two million people died during the bloody, xenophobic Khmer Rouge regime which ran from 1975 to 1979.
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      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/07/2003: Youk Chhang, in his office at the Documentation Center of Cambodia, stands in front of portraits of the chief guards at Tuol Sleng, a Khmer Rouge torture center in Phnom Penh. As the Center's Director, he has spent his adult life compiling information to use against Khmer Rouge leaders when (and if) they are finally brought to trial for crimes against humanity. Approximately two million people died during the bloody, xenophobic Khmer Rouge regime which ran from 1975 to 1979.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Francois Villaret poses for a portrait in his shop "Under the Bo," at the Chiang Mai Night Bazaar.  Villaret has a wide-ranging collection of Asian and African art and antiques from knickknacks and baubles to large pieces of furniture.Francois Villaret poses for a portrait in his shop "Under the Bo," at the Chiang Mai Night Bazaar.  Villaret has a wide-ranging collection of Asian and African art and antiques from knickknacks and baubles to large pieces of furniture.
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      Chiang Mai, Chiang Mai, Thailand - 22/03/2006: Francois Villaret poses for a portrait in his shop "Under the Bo," at the Chiang Mai Night Bazaar. Villaret has a wide-ranging collection of Asian and African art and antiques from knickknacks and baubles to large pieces of furniture.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Prasert Dechaboon and Juhathip Chaiyakul are both HIV positive. They met two years ago and have been living together in a small house in Thailand's northern province of Chiang Mai. They are campaigning for a more caring future for HIV positive people in Thailand. The region they live in is one of the epicenters of the AIDS epidemic in Thailand.Prasert Dechaboon and Juhathip Chaiyakul are both HIV positive. They met two years ago and have been living together in a small house in Thailand's northern province of Chiang Mai. They are campaigning for a more caring future for HIV positive people in Thailand. The region they live in is one of the epicenters of the AIDS epidemic in Thailand.
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      Chiang Mai, Thailand - 01/04/2004: Prasert Dechaboon and Juhathip Chaiyakul are both HIV positive. They met two years ago and have been living together in a small house in Thailand's northern province of Chiang Mai. They are campaigning for a more caring future for HIV positive people in Thailand. The region they live in is one of the epicenters of the AIDS epidemic in Thailand.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Errigo de Jesus, married and with six kids, poses for a portrait with his morning catch from spearfishing on Valu Beach. Men from Tutuala town, about 8 kilometers away, walk each weekend to the beach to catch fish for the week. Errigo de Jesus, married and with six kids, poses for a portrait with his morning catch from spearfishing on Valu Beach. Men from Tutuala town, about 8 kilometers away, walk each weekend to the beach to catch fish for the week.
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      Valu Beach, Tutuala, Timor-Leste (East Timor) - 01/08/2002: Errigo de Jesus, married and with six kids, poses for a portrait with his morning catch from spearfishing on Valu Beach. Men from Tutuala town, about 8 kilometers away, walk each weekend to the beach to catch fish for the week.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Young boys with thanaka paste on their faces, a traditional sunblock and skin beautifier, Burma.Young boys with thanaka paste on their faces, a traditional sunblock and skin beautifier, Burma.
  • A Tamil tea picker takes a break to re-adjust her load on a hillside plantation near Haputale.A Tamil tea picker takes a break to re-adjust her load on a hillside plantation near Haputale.
  • Portrait of Sun Sy Phas, 72, sitting on the verandah of the al Husainiah Mosque in Kagu Jury, a Cham Muslim village in Kampong Chhnang province. She has lived here since 1977. "My husband has died and I live with my children." She has six children: one boy, five girls. She lives with her two widowed daughters. Her husband died in the Pol Pot regime.Portrait of Sun Sy Phas, 72, sitting on the verandah of the al Husainiah Mosque in Kagu Jury, a Cham Muslim village in Kampong Chhnang province. She has lived here since 1977. "My husband has died and I live with my children." She has six children: one boy, five girls. She lives with her two widowed daughters. Her husband died in the Pol Pot regime.
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      Kagu Jury, Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia - 01/08/2003: Portrait of Sun Sy Phas, 72, sitting on the verandah of the al Husainiah Mosque in Kagu Jury, a Cham Muslim village in Kampong Chhnang province. She has lived here since 1977. "My husband has died and I live with my children." She has six children: one boy, five girls. She lives with her two widowed daughters. Her husband died in the Pol Pot regime.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern

 

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