Result Navigation

  • Browse specialities...
    • All specialities
    • General Portfolios
    • Hotels/Spas
    • Animals/Wildlife
    • Architecture/Interiors
    • Architecture/Exteriors
    • Autos/Motoring
    • Celebrities
    • Corporate
    • Documentary
    • Editorial
    • Environmental
    • Fine Art
    • Food/Drink
    • Illustrations
    • Landscapes
    • Nature
    • Nudes
    • People
    • Photojournalism
    • Politics
    • Portraits
    • Still Life/Products
    • Travel
    • War/Combat
    • Weddings
    • Tear Sheets
Food and Restaurants
Leisa Tyler
A selection of my best food, restaurant and chef portrait images

Results

  • Pike perch with elderberries, cookies, and cabbage at Restaurang Volt, a restaurant in downtown Stockholm that is part of the new Nordic cuisine trend. Restaurang Volt uses local and seasonally sourced ingredients with old Swedish cooking techniques to create multi-course degustation meals.Pike perch with elderberries, cookies, and cabbage at Restaurang Volt, a restaurant in downtown Stockholm that is part of the new Nordic cuisine trend. Restaurang Volt uses local and seasonally sourced ingredients with old Swedish cooking techniques to create multi-course degustation meals.
  • Fäviken, headed by chef Magnus Nilsson, is a 12-seat restaurant set on a 24,000 acre farming and hunting estate in remote Jämtland that is in the vanguard of Sweden’s cuisine revolution. The restaurant uses ingredients gathered or grown by the estate and local farmers.Fäviken, headed by chef Magnus Nilsson, is a 12-seat restaurant set on a 24,000 acre farming and hunting estate in remote Jämtland that is in the vanguard of Sweden’s cuisine revolution. The restaurant uses ingredients gathered or grown by the estate and local farmers.
  • Magnus Ek, the chef and owner of Oaxen Krog, headstarted the trend in Sweden to use local produce for fine dining. He opened Oaxen Skafferi, a corner charcuterie on Södermalm Island in Stockholm, selling traditional Swedish meats and dairy products, in 2012.Magnus Ek, the chef and owner of Oaxen Krog, headstarted the trend in Sweden to use local produce for fine dining. He opened Oaxen Skafferi, a corner charcuterie on Södermalm Island in Stockholm, selling traditional Swedish meats and dairy products, in 2012.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • DSC_5616.jpg
      Stockholm, Sweden - 25/09/2012: Magnus Ek, the chef and owner of Oaxen Krog, headstarted the trend in Sweden to use local produce for fine dining. He opened Oaxen Skafferi, a corner charcuterie on Södermalm Island in Stockholm, selling traditional Swedish meats and dairy products, in 2012.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • A bowl of laksa, a spicy noodle soup from the Peranakan or Nyonya cuisine, a fusion of Chinese and Malays cuisines, in Malacca. It's one of Malaysia'a most famous dishes. In Malacca it's usually coconut-based, unlike Penang's assam laksa.A bowl of laksa, a spicy noodle soup from the Peranakan or Nyonya cuisine, a fusion of Chinese and Malays cuisines, in Malacca. It's one of Malaysia'a most famous dishes. In Malacca it's usually coconut-based, unlike Penang's assam laksa.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • DSC_7781.jpg
      Malacca, Malaysia - 16/05/2013: A bowl of laksa, a spicy noodle soup from the Peranakan or Nyonya cuisine, a fusion of Chinese and Malays cuisines, in Malacca. It's one of Malaysia'a most famous dishes. In Malacca it's usually coconut-based, unlike Penang's assam laksa.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • The interior of Tawlet Cafe in Beirut. Meaning "kitchen table" in Arabic, Tawlet opened in November 2009 as an extension of Souk el Tayeb, a Saturday morning organic farmers market. Established in 2004 by Kamal Mouzawak, the son of a farmer who has spent years scouring Lebanon for disappearing foodstuffs, the souk is helping to not only bridge the gap between Lebanon's urban and rural, but bringing people from once-warring religions together. Each day the producers prepare the specialty dishes from their region at Tawlet, including some which Beirutis haven't seen for years. The interior of Tawlet Cafe in Beirut. Meaning "kitchen table" in Arabic, Tawlet opened in November 2009 as an extension of Souk el Tayeb, a Saturday morning organic farmers market. Established in 2004 by Kamal Mouzawak, the son of a farmer who has spent years scouring Lebanon for disappearing foodstuffs, the souk is helping to not only bridge the gap between Lebanon's urban and rural, but bringing people from once-warring religions together. Each day the producers prepare the specialty dishes from their region at Tawlet, including some which Beirutis haven't seen for years.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • lty03112.jpg
      Beirut, Lebanon - 01/04/2010: The interior of Tawlet Cafe in Beirut. Meaning "kitchen table" in Arabic, Tawlet opened in November 2009 as an extension of Souk el Tayeb, a Saturday morning organic farmers market. Established in 2004 by Kamal Mouzawak, the son of a farmer who has spent years scouring Lebanon for disappearing foodstuffs, the souk is helping to not only bridge the gap between Lebanon's urban and rural, but bringing people from once-warring religions together. Each day the producers prepare the specialty dishes from their region at Tawlet, including some which Beirutis haven't seen for years.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Raw scallop ravioli in a purple cauliflower consume at Restaurant Andre in SingaporeRaw scallop ravioli in a purple cauliflower consume at Restaurant Andre in Singapore
  • A lady carries a load of baskets through the narrow lanes at a busy fruit and vegetable market in Bangkok. A sensation for the senses, Thai markets are filled with fresh produce as well as curry pastes and dipping sauces used in the country's cuisine. A meeting place for all Thais, they are also the heart and soul of the culture.A lady carries a load of baskets through the narrow lanes at a busy fruit and vegetable market in Bangkok. A sensation for the senses, Thai markets are filled with fresh produce as well as curry pastes and dipping sauces used in the country's cuisine. A meeting place for all Thais, they are also the heart and soul of the culture.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • lty01885.jpg
      Bangkok, Thailand - 01/10/2004: A lady carries a load of baskets through the narrow lanes at a busy fruit and vegetable market in Bangkok. A sensation for the senses, Thai markets are filled with fresh produce as well as curry pastes and dipping sauces used in the country's cuisine. A meeting place for all Thais, they are also the heart and soul of the culture.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Back lashing against molecular cooking, laboratory-style kitchens and high tech gadgetry, former TV chef Niklaus Ekstedt  has gone back to basics in his latest Stockholm restaurant, Ekstedt, using an open pit fire, cast iron combustion and wood oven in his electricity-free “stone age” kitchen.Back lashing against molecular cooking, laboratory-style kitchens and high tech gadgetry, former TV chef Niklaus Ekstedt  has gone back to basics in his latest Stockholm restaurant, Ekstedt, using an open pit fire, cast iron combustion and wood oven in his electricity-free “stone age” kitchen.
  • Back lashing against molecular cooking, laboratory-style kitchens and high tech gadgetry, former TV chef Niklaus Ekstedt  has gone back to basics in his latest Stockholm restaurant, Ekstedt, using an open pit fire, cast iron combustion and wood oven in his electricity-free “stone age” kitchen.Back lashing against molecular cooking, laboratory-style kitchens and high tech gadgetry, former TV chef Niklaus Ekstedt  has gone back to basics in his latest Stockholm restaurant, Ekstedt, using an open pit fire, cast iron combustion and wood oven in his electricity-free “stone age” kitchen.
  • Back lashing against molecular cooking, laboratory-style kitchens and high tech gadgetry, former TV chef Niklaus Ekstedt  has gone back to basics in his latest Stockholm restaurant, Ekstedt, using an open pit fire, cast iron combustion and wood oven in his electricity-free “stone age” kitchen.Back lashing against molecular cooking, laboratory-style kitchens and high tech gadgetry, former TV chef Niklaus Ekstedt  has gone back to basics in his latest Stockholm restaurant, Ekstedt, using an open pit fire, cast iron combustion and wood oven in his electricity-free “stone age” kitchen.
  • Pomegranates at Burra Bazar, otherwise known as Bara Bazar and one of India's biggest wholesale markets. Situated in central Kolkata, the market dates back to the 17th century and attracts 50,000 merchants a day.Pomegranates at Burra Bazar, otherwise known as Bara Bazar and one of India's biggest wholesale markets. Situated in central Kolkata, the market dates back to the 17th century and attracts 50,000 merchants a day.
  • A bowl of guatiaw nam at a street stall in Bangkok. Street food first appeared in Bangkok through the mass migration of Chinese itinerant workers in the 19th century, who didn't have, or couldn't afford, kitchens, creating a demand for ready meals. Thailand now has one of the most vibrant street food cultures in the world, however, the majority of dishes are not traditionally Thai - but derivations of cuisines brought with early traders from India, Malaysia and essentially- China.A bowl of guatiaw nam at a street stall in Bangkok. Street food first appeared in Bangkok through the mass migration of Chinese itinerant workers in the 19th century, who didn't have, or couldn't afford, kitchens, creating a demand for ready meals. Thailand now has one of the most vibrant street food cultures in the world, however, the majority of dishes are not traditionally Thai - but derivations of cuisines brought with early traders from India, Malaysia and essentially- China.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • View more from 'David Thompson on Thai Cuisine'
    • lty03031.jpg
      Bangkok, Thailand - 13/07/2010: A bowl of guatiaw nam at a street stall in Bangkok. Street food first appeared in Bangkok through the mass migration of Chinese itinerant workers in the 19th century, who didn't have, or couldn't afford, kitchens, creating a demand for ready meals. Thailand now has one of the most vibrant street food cultures in the world, however, the majority of dishes are not traditionally Thai - but derivations of cuisines brought with early traders from India, Malaysia and essentially- China.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Taiwanese- born chef Andre Chiang in his eponymous China Town restaurant in SingaporeTaiwanese- born chef Andre Chiang in his eponymous China Town restaurant in Singapore
  • Sea salt with oyster, sea grapes and apple foam at Restaurant Andre in Singapore.Sea salt with oyster, sea grapes and apple foam at Restaurant Andre in Singapore.
  • Mathias Dahlgren’s Stockholm restaurant, Matsalen, on the ground floor of the elegant Grand Hotel.Mathias Dahlgren’s Stockholm restaurant, Matsalen, on the ground floor of the elegant Grand Hotel.
  • Sliced swede and turnip with raw beef at Restaurant Ask in Helsinki.Sliced swede and turnip with raw beef at Restaurant Ask in Helsinki.
  • Sea urchin, a signature dish of Tetsuya Wakuda, at his Singapore restaurant, Waku GhinSea urchin, a signature dish of Tetsuya Wakuda, at his Singapore restaurant, Waku Ghin
  • Fresh seafood at the market in Dungun, a small fishing town straddling the mouth of the Dungun river, on peninsular Malaysia's east coast, a predominantly Muslim Malay inhabited seashore which boasts some of the most beautiful- and untouched - beaches in Asia. The local food has close ties to neighbouring Thailand with quick cooked curries, a liberal use of lemongrass and sweeter tastes than the Malay, Hokkien Chinese and southern Indian flavours popular in Malaysian cuisine.Fresh seafood at the market in Dungun, a small fishing town straddling the mouth of the Dungun river, on peninsular Malaysia's east coast, a predominantly Muslim Malay inhabited seashore which boasts some of the most beautiful- and untouched - beaches in Asia. The local food has close ties to neighbouring Thailand with quick cooked curries, a liberal use of lemongrass and sweeter tastes than the Malay, Hokkien Chinese and southern Indian flavours popular in Malaysian cuisine.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • DSC_7911.jpg
      Dungun, Malaysia - 23/05/2013: Fresh seafood at the market in Dungun, a small fishing town straddling the mouth of the Dungun river, on peninsular Malaysia's east coast, a predominantly Muslim Malay inhabited seashore which boasts some of the most beautiful- and untouched - beaches in Asia. The local food has close ties to neighbouring Thailand with quick cooked curries, a liberal use of lemongrass and sweeter tastes than the Malay, Hokkien Chinese and southern Indian flavours popular in Malaysian cuisine.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Egg custard with yubu and sea urchin at Tenku Ryu-Gin.
Tenku Ryu-Gin is the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.Egg custard with yubu and sea urchin at Tenku Ryu-Gin.
Tenku Ryu-Gin is the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.
  • David Thompson in the kitchen of his new restaurant Nahm, at the Metropolitan hotel in Bangkok. Thompson, an Australian native, is widely regarded as the world's foremost expert in Thai cuisine and cooking. His first Nahm, in London, was the first Thai restaurant in the world to be awarded  a Michelin star. David Thompson in the kitchen of his new restaurant Nahm, at the Metropolitan hotel in Bangkok. Thompson, an Australian native, is widely regarded as the world's foremost expert in Thai cuisine and cooking. His first Nahm, in London, was the first Thai restaurant in the world to be awarded  a Michelin star.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • lty03053.jpg
      Bangkok, Thailand - 14/07/2010: David Thompson in the kitchen of his new restaurant Nahm, at the Metropolitan hotel in Bangkok. Thompson, an Australian native, is widely regarded as the world's foremost expert in Thai cuisine and cooking. His first Nahm, in London, was the first Thai restaurant in the world to be awarded a Michelin star.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Flanking the pavement, under a tent of blue plastic, Jetendra Pandit and his wife are making puchka, savoury bombs of semolina pastry filled with mashed potato, chickpeas, tamarind paste and chaat masala. They work from a single light bulb and gas flame. In a city famous for puchka, Pandit’s are known as the best. His family have held this stall for three generations. Pandit churns the crispy orbs out by the second, stuffing them with the potato filling before dipping into tamarind water and sending to outstretched hands.Flanking the pavement, under a tent of blue plastic, Jetendra Pandit and his wife are making puchka, savoury bombs of semolina pastry filled with mashed potato, chickpeas, tamarind paste and chaat masala. They work from a single light bulb and gas flame. In a city famous for puchka, Pandit’s are known as the best. His family have held this stall for three generations. Pandit churns the crispy orbs out by the second, stuffing them with the potato filling before dipping into tamarind water and sending to outstretched hands.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • View more from 'Chef Gaggan Anand in Kolkata'
    • DSC_8701.jpg
      Kolkata, India - 26/11/2013: Flanking the pavement, under a tent of blue plastic, Jetendra Pandit and his wife are making puchka, savoury bombs of semolina pastry filled with mashed potato, chickpeas, tamarind paste and chaat masala. They work from a single light bulb and gas flame. In a city famous for puchka, Pandit’s are known as the best. His family have held this stall for three generations. Pandit churns the crispy orbs out by the second, stuffing them with the potato filling before dipping into tamarind water and sending to outstretched hands.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Making papdi chaat at Burra Bazar, otherwise known as Bara Bazar and one of India's biggest wholesale markets. Situated in central Kolkata, the market dates back to the 17th century and attracts 50,000 merchants a day.Making papdi chaat at Burra Bazar, otherwise known as Bara Bazar and one of India's biggest wholesale markets. Situated in central Kolkata, the market dates back to the 17th century and attracts 50,000 merchants a day.
  • Vegetable cutlets at Gupta Brothers in Kolkata. The several generations old Bengali sweet shop is famous for its elaborate multi-coloured sweets made from reduced milk and and savoury treats, like vegetable cutlets, served in banana leaf cups or tin foil and eaten with wooden spoons.Vegetable cutlets at Gupta Brothers in Kolkata. The several generations old Bengali sweet shop is famous for its elaborate multi-coloured sweets made from reduced milk and and savoury treats, like vegetable cutlets, served in banana leaf cups or tin foil and eaten with wooden spoons.
  • A satay vendor at Or Tor Kor Market in Bangkok. Street food first appeared in Bangkok through the mass migration of Chinese itinerant workers in the 19th century, who didn't have, or couldn't afford, kitchens, creating a demand for ready meals. Thailand now has one of the most vibrant street food cultures in the world, however, the majority of dishes are not traditionally Thai - but derivations of cusines brought with early traders from India, Malaysia and China.A satay vendor at Or Tor Kor Market in Bangkok. Street food first appeared in Bangkok through the mass migration of Chinese itinerant workers in the 19th century, who didn't have, or couldn't afford, kitchens, creating a demand for ready meals. Thailand now has one of the most vibrant street food cultures in the world, however, the majority of dishes are not traditionally Thai - but derivations of cusines brought with early traders from India, Malaysia and China.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • View more from 'David Thompson on Thai Cuisine'
    • lty03026.jpg
      Bangkok, Thailand - 12/07/2010: A satay vendor at Or Tor Kor Market in Bangkok. Street food first appeared in Bangkok through the mass migration of Chinese itinerant workers in the 19th century, who didn't have, or couldn't afford, kitchens, creating a demand for ready meals. Thailand now has one of the most vibrant street food cultures in the world, however, the majority of dishes are not traditionally Thai - but derivations of cusines brought with early traders from India, Malaysia and China.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Fäviken, headed by chef Magnus Nilsson, is a 12-seat restaurant set on a 24,000 acre farming and hunting estate in remote Jämtland that is in the vanguard of Sweden’s cuisine revolution. The restaurant uses ingredients gathered or grown by the estate and local farmers.Fäviken, headed by chef Magnus Nilsson, is a 12-seat restaurant set on a 24,000 acre farming and hunting estate in remote Jämtland that is in the vanguard of Sweden’s cuisine revolution. The restaurant uses ingredients gathered or grown by the estate and local farmers.
  • Chicken rice beansprout, boiled chicken served with bean sprouts and a slightly sweet soy sauce, at Ipoh's Lou Wong restaurant. The British colonial town of Ipoh, once renowned for its tin mining riches, is now a foodie heaven. Chicken rice beansprouts is one of Ipoh's most famous dishes, and Lou Wong one of the most popular places to eat it.Chicken rice beansprout, boiled chicken served with bean sprouts and a slightly sweet soy sauce, at Ipoh's Lou Wong restaurant. The British colonial town of Ipoh, once renowned for its tin mining riches, is now a foodie heaven. Chicken rice beansprouts is one of Ipoh's most famous dishes, and Lou Wong one of the most popular places to eat it.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • DSC_7584.jpg
      Ipoh, Malaysia - 11/05/2013: Chicken rice beansprout, boiled chicken served with bean sprouts and a slightly sweet soy sauce, at Ipoh's Lou Wong restaurant. The British colonial town of Ipoh, once renowned for its tin mining riches, is now a foodie heaven. Chicken rice beansprouts is one of Ipoh's most famous dishes, and Lou Wong one of the most popular places to eat it.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Flanking the pavement, under a tent of blue plastic, Jetendra Pandit and his wife are making puchka, savoury bombs of semolina pastry filled with mashed potato, chickpeas, tamarind paste and chaat masala. They work from a single light bulb and gas flame. In a city famous for puchka, Pandit’s are known as the best. His family have held this stall for three generations. Pandit churns the crispy orbs out by the second, stuffing them with the potato filling before dipping into tamarind water and sending to outstretched hands.Flanking the pavement, under a tent of blue plastic, Jetendra Pandit and his wife are making puchka, savoury bombs of semolina pastry filled with mashed potato, chickpeas, tamarind paste and chaat masala. They work from a single light bulb and gas flame. In a city famous for puchka, Pandit’s are known as the best. His family have held this stall for three generations. Pandit churns the crispy orbs out by the second, stuffing them with the potato filling before dipping into tamarind water and sending to outstretched hands.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • View more from 'Chef Gaggan Anand in Kolkata'
    • DSC_8684.jpg
      Kolkata, India - 26/11/2013: Flanking the pavement, under a tent of blue plastic, Jetendra Pandit and his wife are making puchka, savoury bombs of semolina pastry filled with mashed potato, chickpeas, tamarind paste and chaat masala. They work from a single light bulb and gas flame. In a city famous for puchka, Pandit’s are known as the best. His family have held this stall for three generations. Pandit churns the crispy orbs out by the second, stuffing them with the potato filling before dipping into tamarind water and sending to outstretched hands.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • An Uighur man and his honeydew melon at Kashgar's Sunday Bazaar, Xingiang. Dating more than 2000 years, the Kashgar Sunday bazaar is the biggest in Central Asia, attracting more than 50,000 people from across the region who come to buy and sell their wares. Kashgar sits on the far reaches of the Taklamakan Desert. Kashgar was one of the most important trading hubs on the Silk Route, greeting merchants and caravans as they passed between the East and West.\Ethnically Uighur, Kashgar came under Chinese government and military control during the mid 20th century. Despite bloody protests and uprisings, Xingiang remains under  Chinese occupation, making the Uighurs a minority in their own homeland.\An Uighur man and his honeydew melon at Kashgar's Sunday Bazaar, Xingiang. Dating more than 2000 years, the Kashgar Sunday bazaar is the biggest in Central Asia, attracting more than 50,000 people from across the region who come to buy and sell their wares. Kashgar sits on the far reaches of the Taklamakan Desert. Kashgar was one of the most important trading hubs on the Silk Route, greeting merchants and caravans as they passed between the East and West.\Ethnically Uighur, Kashgar came under Chinese government and military control during the mid 20th century. Despite bloody protests and uprisings, Xingiang remains under  Chinese occupation, making the Uighurs a minority in their own homeland.\
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • lty00656.jpg
      Kashgar, Xingiang, China - 01/08/2001: An Uighur man and his honeydew melon at Kashgar's Sunday Bazaar, Xingiang. Dating more than 2000 years, the Kashgar Sunday bazaar is the biggest in Central Asia, attracting more than 50,000 people from across the region who come to buy and sell their wares. Kashgar sits on the far reaches of the Taklamakan Desert. Kashgar was one of the most important trading hubs on the Silk Route, greeting merchants and caravans as they passed between the East and West.\Ethnically Uighur, Kashgar came under Chinese government and military control during the mid 20th century. Despite bloody protests and uprisings, Xingiang remains under Chinese occupation, making the Uighurs a minority in their own homeland.\
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Satio Tempesta salad at Restaurant Frantzén (formerly Frantzén/ Lindeberg), a 17-seat restaurant by chef Björn Frantzén on Stadsholmen Island in Stockholm. Mr Frantzen is renowned for his wild pairings using ingredients almost entirely grown by two local farmers. The Satio Tempesta salad features 40 different kinds of fruit and vegetables.Satio Tempesta salad at Restaurant Frantzén (formerly Frantzén/ Lindeberg), a 17-seat restaurant by chef Björn Frantzén on Stadsholmen Island in Stockholm. Mr Frantzen is renowned for his wild pairings using ingredients almost entirely grown by two local farmers. The Satio Tempesta salad features 40 different kinds of fruit and vegetables.
  • Kuroge wagyu beef with white asparagus and morel mushrooms at Tenku Ryu-Gin. Tenku Ryu-Gin is the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.Kuroge wagyu beef with white asparagus and morel mushrooms at Tenku Ryu-Gin. Tenku Ryu-Gin is the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.
  • Fresh cashew nuts at the market in Dungun, a small fishing town straddling the mouth of the Dungun river, on peninsular Malaysia's east coast, a predominantly Muslim Malay inhabited seashore which boasts some of the most beautiful- and untouched - beaches in Asia. The local food has close ties to neighbouring Thailand with quick cooked curries, a liberal use of lemongrass and sweeter tastes than the Malay, Hokkien Chinese and southern Indian flavours popular in Malaysian cuisine.Fresh cashew nuts at the market in Dungun, a small fishing town straddling the mouth of the Dungun river, on peninsular Malaysia's east coast, a predominantly Muslim Malay inhabited seashore which boasts some of the most beautiful- and untouched - beaches in Asia. The local food has close ties to neighbouring Thailand with quick cooked curries, a liberal use of lemongrass and sweeter tastes than the Malay, Hokkien Chinese and southern Indian flavours popular in Malaysian cuisine.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • DSC_7943.jpg
      Dungun, Malaysia - 23/05/2013: Fresh cashew nuts at the market in Dungun, a small fishing town straddling the mouth of the Dungun river, on peninsular Malaysia's east coast, a predominantly Muslim Malay inhabited seashore which boasts some of the most beautiful- and untouched - beaches in Asia. The local food has close ties to neighbouring Thailand with quick cooked curries, a liberal use of lemongrass and sweeter tastes than the Malay, Hokkien Chinese and southern Indian flavours popular in Malaysian cuisine.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • David Thompson dining with friends on fish ball soup at Suan Luang night market in Bangkok. Thompson, an Australian native, is widely regarded as the world's foremost expert in Thai cuisine and cooking. His restaurant, Nahm, in London, was the first Thai restaurant in the world to be awarded a Michelin star. David Thompson dining with friends on fish ball soup at Suan Luang night market in Bangkok. Thompson, an Australian native, is widely regarded as the world's foremost expert in Thai cuisine and cooking. His restaurant, Nahm, in London, was the first Thai restaurant in the world to be awarded a Michelin star.
  • Kebbenaya at Mayrig, an Armenian restaurant with delicacies from the former Armenian parts of eastern Turkey and one of Beirut's best places to eat. Kebbenaya is raw meat mixed with cracked bulgur.Kebbenaya at Mayrig, an Armenian restaurant with delicacies from the former Armenian parts of eastern Turkey and one of Beirut's best places to eat. Kebbenaya is raw meat mixed with cracked bulgur.
  • Chef Jaakko Kinnunen of restaurant Spis in Helsinki preparing pumpkin with sage and fresh Finnish goat cheese.Chef Jaakko Kinnunen of restaurant Spis in Helsinki preparing pumpkin with sage and fresh Finnish goat cheese.
  • Beef tartar with egg and apple mustard at Laris, the restaurant of David Laris in Hong KongBeef tartar with egg and apple mustard at Laris, the restaurant of David Laris in Hong Kong
  • Lunch at Thanyamundra Organic Resort - a nine-room retreat that opened in early 2012 in Khao Sok by former banker, German Klaus Hebben, as a weekend retreat from his businesses in Phuket.Lunch at Thanyamundra Organic Resort - a nine-room retreat that opened in early 2012 in Khao Sok by former banker, German Klaus Hebben, as a weekend retreat from his businesses in Phuket.
  • A cooking class at Thanyamundra Organic Resort - a nine-room retreat that opened in early 2012 in Khao Sok by former banker, German Klaus Hebben, as a weekend retreat from his businesses in Phuket.A cooking class at Thanyamundra Organic Resort - a nine-room retreat that opened in early 2012 in Khao Sok by former banker, German Klaus Hebben, as a weekend retreat from his businesses in Phuket.
  • A wok and spatula used at the Four Season's Cooking School in Chiang Mai.

Designed by the hotel guru Bill Bensley and starring some of the kingdom's best loved chefs, the Four Season's hosts one of the most comprehensive cooking schools in the Kingdom; cooking schools the latest trend for visiting tourists, allowing them to learn the tricks of one of the world's most loved cuisines.A wok and spatula used at the Four Season's Cooking School in Chiang Mai.

Designed by the hotel guru Bill Bensley and starring some of the kingdom's best loved chefs, the Four Season's hosts one of the most comprehensive cooking schools in the Kingdom; cooking schools the latest trend for visiting tourists, allowing them to learn the tricks of one of the world's most loved cuisines.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • lty01877.jpg
      Chaing Mai, Thailand - 01/10/2004: A wok and spatula used at the Four Season's Cooking School in Chiang Mai. Designed by the hotel guru Bill Bensley and starring some of the kingdom's best loved chefs, the Four Season's hosts one of the most comprehensive cooking schools in the Kingdom; cooking schools the latest trend for visiting tourists, allowing them to learn the tricks of one of the world's most loved cuisines.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • A thousand years ago, in the heyday of the Japanese imperial court, royals and nobles would embark on weeks-long treks to pray at the three principle Shinto-Buddhist shrines at the heart of Kumano, a rugged swath of the Kii Peninsula in southernmost Honshu. Dressed in the white of the dead, they would pay homage to the smaller subsidiary shrines, or oji, that marked the way, as well as to the trees and rocks themselves. Trekking the Kumano Kodo, as the network of trails was named, was as much a purification rite as a celebration of nature. 
After years of obscurity following Japan's modernisation, in 2004 the Kumano Kodo received World Heritage listing, one of only two pilgrimage routes in the world with this title (the other is Spain’s Way of St. James). It has helped fuel a revival along the trail, restoring the tracks and temples and bringing money to Japan's ailing rural population.
Kiri-no-Sato Takahara Lodge is one property that has benefited from the increase in tourists. They serve foraged mountain herbs and vegetables, including boiled konnyaku (a yamlike tuber otherwise known as devil’s tongue), flowering bamboo, wild spinach, eggplant with onion, and a dashi broth enlivened by fatty slithers of pork.A thousand years ago, in the heyday of the Japanese imperial court, royals and nobles would embark on weeks-long treks to pray at the three principle Shinto-Buddhist shrines at the heart of Kumano, a rugged swath of the Kii Peninsula in southernmost Honshu. Dressed in the white of the dead, they would pay homage to the smaller subsidiary shrines, or oji, that marked the way, as well as to the trees and rocks themselves. Trekking the Kumano Kodo, as the network of trails was named, was as much a purification rite as a celebration of nature. 
After years of obscurity following Japan's modernisation, in 2004 the Kumano Kodo received World Heritage listing, one of only two pilgrimage routes in the world with this title (the other is Spain’s Way of St. James). It has helped fuel a revival along the trail, restoring the tracks and temples and bringing money to Japan's ailing rural population.
Kiri-no-Sato Takahara Lodge is one property that has benefited from the increase in tourists. They serve foraged mountain herbs and vegetables, including boiled konnyaku (a yamlike tuber otherwise known as devil’s tongue), flowering bamboo, wild spinach, eggplant with onion, and a dashi broth enlivened by fatty slithers of pork.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • View more from 'Trekking the Kumano Kodo'
    • DSC_7039.jpg
      Wakayama, Japan - 19/03/2013: A thousand years ago, in the heyday of the Japanese imperial court, royals and nobles would embark on weeks-long treks to pray at the three principle Shinto-Buddhist shrines at the heart of Kumano, a rugged swath of the Kii Peninsula in southernmost Honshu. Dressed in the white of the dead, they would pay homage to the smaller subsidiary shrines, or oji, that marked the way, as well as to the trees and rocks themselves. Trekking the Kumano Kodo, as the network of trails was named, was as much a purification rite as a celebration of nature. After years of obscurity following Japan's modernisation, in 2004 the Kumano Kodo received World Heritage listing, one of only two pilgrimage routes in the world with this title (the other is Spain’s Way of St. James). It has helped fuel a revival along the trail, restoring the tracks and temples and bringing money to Japan's ailing rural population. Kiri-no-Sato Takahara Lodge is one property that has benefited from the increase in tourists. They serve foraged mountain herbs and vegetables, including boiled konnyaku (a yamlike tuber otherwise known as devil’s tongue), flowering bamboo, wild spinach, eggplant with onion, and a dashi broth enlivened by fatty slithers of pork.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Provenance is central to 30-year old Daniel Berlin’s eponymous 10-seat restaurant in Skåne Tranås, a tiny village of 300 people an hour’s drive from Malmo in Sweden’s south. What the small vegetable patch and tangle of wild berry bushes behind the restaurant don’t supply, Berlin sources from mostly a 30km radius.Provenance is central to 30-year old Daniel Berlin’s eponymous 10-seat restaurant in Skåne Tranås, a tiny village of 300 people an hour’s drive from Malmo in Sweden’s south. What the small vegetable patch and tangle of wild berry bushes behind the restaurant don’t supply, Berlin sources from mostly a 30km radius.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • DSC_5759.jpg
      Skåne Tranås, Sweden - 27/09/2012: Provenance is central to 30-year old Daniel Berlin’s eponymous 10-seat restaurant in Skåne Tranås, a tiny village of 300 people an hour’s drive from Malmo in Sweden’s south. What the small vegetable patch and tangle of wild berry bushes behind the restaurant don’t supply, Berlin sources from mostly a 30km radius.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Deep fried ice fish with spring vegetables at Tenku Ryu-Gin.
Tenku Ryu-Gin is the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.Deep fried ice fish with spring vegetables at Tenku Ryu-Gin.
Tenku Ryu-Gin is the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.
  • Lunch at Thanyamundra Organic Resort - a nine-room retreat that opened in early 2012 in Khao Sok by former banker, German Klaus Hebben, as a weekend retreat from his businesses in Phuket.Lunch at Thanyamundra Organic Resort - a nine-room retreat that opened in early 2012 in Khao Sok by former banker, German Klaus Hebben, as a weekend retreat from his businesses in Phuket.
  • Candy mandarin at Tenku Ryu-Gin, the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.Candy mandarin at Tenku Ryu-Gin, the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • DSC_7482.jpg
      Hong Kong, China - 25/03/2013: Candy mandarin at Tenku Ryu-Gin, the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Sourdough and rye bread with organic butter at restaurant Chef & Sommelier in Helsinki.Sourdough and rye bread with organic butter at restaurant Chef & Sommelier in Helsinki.
  • Mathias Dahlgren’s Stockholm restaurant, Matsalen, on the ground floor of the elegant Grand Hotel.Mathias Dahlgren’s Stockholm restaurant, Matsalen, on the ground floor of the elegant Grand Hotel.
  • Liquorice with strawberry mousse and raspberry sorbet dessert at restaurant Olo in Helsinki.Liquorice with strawberry mousse and raspberry sorbet dessert at restaurant Olo in Helsinki.
  • Eating lunch at Vorn's homestay on Koh Trong, an island in the Mekong River in in Cambodia. The people of Cambodia, like most cultures in South East Asia, eat sitting cross legged on a mat on the floor. Food is eaten from sharing bowls.Eating lunch at Vorn's homestay on Koh Trong, an island in the Mekong River in in Cambodia. The people of Cambodia, like most cultures in South East Asia, eat sitting cross legged on a mat on the floor. Food is eaten from sharing bowls.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • DSC_2563.jpg
      Koh Trong, Cambodia - 21/05/2011: Eating lunch at Vorn's homestay on Koh Trong, an island in the Mekong River in in Cambodia. The people of Cambodia, like most cultures in South East Asia, eat sitting cross legged on a mat on the floor. Food is eaten from sharing bowls.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • A young boy makes breakfast chapati- small round disks of bread baked on a tava- in an inner city Calcutta neighbourhood. This tava has been placed over a tandoori oven, an extremely hot wood fired oven that will be used to make leavened breads like naan later in the day.A young boy makes breakfast chapati- small round disks of bread baked on a tava- in an inner city Calcutta neighbourhood. This tava has been placed over a tandoori oven, an extremely hot wood fired oven that will be used to make leavened breads like naan later in the day.
  • Eel with slices of apple at Restaurant Ask in Helsinki.Eel with slices of apple at Restaurant Ask in Helsinki.
  • A kebab stall in the old town of Kashgar, the ancient Silk Road hub on the edge of the Taklamakan Desert in Western China. Kashgar is the last city in Xingiang where the Uigurs have not become a minority.  The Uighur homeland was occupied by Chinese forces during the mid 1900's and is rapidly being "liberated" through mass development and tax incentives offered to millions of Han Chinese to move into the region.A kebab stall in the old town of Kashgar, the ancient Silk Road hub on the edge of the Taklamakan Desert in Western China. Kashgar is the last city in Xingiang where the Uigurs have not become a minority.  The Uighur homeland was occupied by Chinese forces during the mid 1900's and is rapidly being "liberated" through mass development and tax incentives offered to millions of Han Chinese to move into the region.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • View more from 'Main portfolio'
    • lty00284.jpg
      Kashgar, Xingiang, China - 01/08/2002: A kebab stall in the old town of Kashgar, the ancient Silk Road hub on the edge of the Taklamakan Desert in Western China. Kashgar is the last city in Xingiang where the Uigurs have not become a minority. The Uighur homeland was occupied by Chinese forces during the mid 1900's and is rapidly being "liberated" through mass development and tax incentives offered to millions of Han Chinese to move into the region.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler

 

You must be signed in to use this functionality.
Click here to register.