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Main portfolio
Leisa Tyler
A selection of my work and places I have been.

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  • A young Kyrgyz boy outside his family's yurta - traditional felt tent able to withstand extreme cold on the jailoo - summer pastures tucked into the Tian Shan in central Kyrgyzstan. A traditionally nomadic country, most of the Kyrgyz herdsmen were collectivised during the Soviet days, which included Kyrgyzstan as a state of the empire. The fall of the Soviet Union in 1992 witnessed many nomads return to life in a tent. The Kyrgyz say they are descendents of the Mongols - in particular, Genghis Khan himself. Although their facial features and cultural habits align them more with the Turks.A young Kyrgyz boy outside his family's yurta - traditional felt tent able to withstand extreme cold on the jailoo - summer pastures tucked into the Tian Shan in central Kyrgyzstan. A traditionally nomadic country, most of the Kyrgyz herdsmen were collectivised during the Soviet days, which included Kyrgyzstan as a state of the empire. The fall of the Soviet Union in 1992 witnessed many nomads return to life in a tent. The Kyrgyz say they are descendents of the Mongols - in particular, Genghis Khan himself. Although their facial features and cultural habits align them more with the Turks.
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      Naryn, Kyrgyzstan - 01/08/2001: A young Kyrgyz boy outside his family's yurta - traditional felt tent able to withstand extreme cold on the jailoo - summer pastures tucked into the Tian Shan in central Kyrgyzstan. A traditionally nomadic country, most of the Kyrgyz herdsmen were collectivised during the Soviet days, which included Kyrgyzstan as a state of the empire. The fall of the Soviet Union in 1992 witnessed many nomads return to life in a tent. The Kyrgyz say they are descendents of the Mongols - in particular, Genghis Khan himself. Although their facial features and cultural habits align them more with the Turks.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • A naturalist from Mahua Kothi, a safari lodge on the edge of Baghavahn National Park, India. Opened in late 2006, Mahua Kothi is a collaboration between CC Africa, a safari company in Africa, and Indian-based Taj Hotels and Resorts. Using sustainable (and local) building techniques and materials, buying local produce, employing local staff and educating villagers on the importance of protecting the tiger (and consequently protect tourism to their park), CC Africa and Taj Hotels and Resorts are hoping to take the circus out of Indian wildlife tourism, and inadvertedly save the tiger. Mahua Kothi is the first of four properties that this Taj/CC Africa collaberation will open in Mahdya Pradesh between late 2006 and 2009.  Bandhavgarh National Park - the former home of the Royal family of Rawa - is now a tiger sanctuary with the highest concentrations of tigers in India.  It is said that in years gone by, tigers in Bandhavgarh were so prolific it was considered an omen for the ruling Maharaja to kill 109 per lifetime in order to bring peace and prosperity to his people. Tiger numbers in India have fallen to critical levels in recent years; from 300,000 at the turn of the 20th century to a government estimated figure of 3,500 today (critics claim numbers are closer to 1,500 today. India maintains strict and regimental control over their many tiger parks, but despite this, numbers continue to fall. Many tigers are poached by villagers, as an adult can fetch up to US$20,000 on the black market. Indian farmers can expect to earn less than US$1000 a year.A naturalist from Mahua Kothi, a safari lodge on the edge of Baghavahn National Park, India. Opened in late 2006, Mahua Kothi is a collaboration between CC Africa, a safari company in Africa, and Indian-based Taj Hotels and Resorts. Using sustainable (and local) building techniques and materials, buying local produce, employing local staff and educating villagers on the importance of protecting the tiger (and consequently protect tourism to their park), CC Africa and Taj Hotels and Resorts are hoping to take the circus out of Indian wildlife tourism, and inadvertedly save the tiger. Mahua Kothi is the first of four properties that this Taj/CC Africa collaberation will open in Mahdya Pradesh between late 2006 and 2009.  Bandhavgarh National Park - the former home of the Royal family of Rawa - is now a tiger sanctuary with the highest concentrations of tigers in India.  It is said that in years gone by, tigers in Bandhavgarh were so prolific it was considered an omen for the ruling Maharaja to kill 109 per lifetime in order to bring peace and prosperity to his people. Tiger numbers in India have fallen to critical levels in recent years; from 300,000 at the turn of the 20th century to a government estimated figure of 3,500 today (critics claim numbers are closer to 1,500 today. India maintains strict and regimental control over their many tiger parks, but despite this, numbers continue to fall. Many tigers are poached by villagers, as an adult can fetch up to US$20,000 on the black market. Indian farmers can expect to earn less than US$1000 a year.
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      Mahdya Pradesh, India - 15/10/2007: A naturalist from Mahua Kothi, a safari lodge on the edge of Baghavahn National Park, India. Opened in late 2006, Mahua Kothi is a collaboration between CC Africa, a safari company in Africa, and Indian-based Taj Hotels and Resorts. Using sustainable (and local) building techniques and materials, buying local produce, employing local staff and educating villagers on the importance of protecting the tiger (and consequently protect tourism to their park), CC Africa and Taj Hotels and Resorts are hoping to take the circus out of Indian wildlife tourism, and inadvertedly save the tiger. Mahua Kothi is the first of four properties that this Taj/CC Africa collaberation will open in Mahdya Pradesh between late 2006 and 2009. Bandhavgarh National Park - the former home of the Royal family of Rawa - is now a tiger sanctuary with the highest concentrations of tigers in India. It is said that in years gone by, tigers in Bandhavgarh were so prolific it was considered an omen for the ruling Maharaja to kill 109 per lifetime in order to bring peace and prosperity to his people. Tiger numbers in India have fallen to critical levels in recent years; from 300,000 at the turn of the 20th century to a government estimated figure of 3,500 today (critics claim numbers are closer to 1,500 today. India maintains strict and regimental control over their many tiger parks, but despite this, numbers continue to fall. Many tigers are poached by villagers, as an adult can fetch up to US$20,000 on the black market. Indian farmers can expect to earn less than US$1000 a year.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Eel with slices of apple at Restaurant Ask in Helsinki.Eel with slices of apple at Restaurant Ask in Helsinki.
  • Jeanette Mix's boutique hotel Ett Hem, designed by British-based Ilse Crawford and housed in a former office block in the upmarket neighbourhood of Lärkstan in Stockholm, offers smooth confidence and unflinching style.Jeanette Mix's boutique hotel Ett Hem, designed by British-based Ilse Crawford and housed in a former office block in the upmarket neighbourhood of Lärkstan in Stockholm, offers smooth confidence and unflinching style.
  • Nomads in the Alay Valley in southern Kyrgyzstan.  Sitting over 2500 meters and covered in snow in winter, in summer the transhumance Kyrgyz move to the mountains and set up yurts, or use caravans, as second homes to graze their livestock. While the Kyrgyz semi-nomadic existence wasn't abolished during the country's Soviet period, it has experienced a resurgent since independence due to economic hardship.Nomads in the Alay Valley in southern Kyrgyzstan.  Sitting over 2500 meters and covered in snow in winter, in summer the transhumance Kyrgyz move to the mountains and set up yurts, or use caravans, as second homes to graze their livestock. While the Kyrgyz semi-nomadic existence wasn't abolished during the country's Soviet period, it has experienced a resurgent since independence due to economic hardship.
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      Alay Valley, Osh, Kyrgyzstan - 01/07/2005: Nomads in the Alay Valley in southern Kyrgyzstan. Sitting over 2500 meters and covered in snow in winter, in summer the transhumance Kyrgyz move to the mountains and set up yurts, or use caravans, as second homes to graze their livestock. While the Kyrgyz semi-nomadic existence wasn't abolished during the country's Soviet period, it has experienced a resurgent since independence due to economic hardship.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Mehmet Gurs, a Turkish celebrity chef, in his restaurant Mikla, in Istanbul.Mehmet Gurs, a Turkish celebrity chef, in his restaurant Mikla, in Istanbul.
  • A child with a spider man face mask sells toy wind flags on the Marine Drive jogging track at dusk, Mumbai, India.A child with a spider man face mask sells toy wind flags on the Marine Drive jogging track at dusk, Mumbai, India.
  • Tourists watch the sun go down over yardangs in the Lut Desert in Shahad, Iran. Known as kaluts in Iran, yardangs are geological formations created by the dual action of wind and sand on rock. Lut is the world's 25th largest desert and a UNESCO World Heritage site.Tourists watch the sun go down over yardangs in the Lut Desert in Shahad, Iran. Known as kaluts in Iran, yardangs are geological formations created by the dual action of wind and sand on rock. Lut is the world's 25th largest desert and a UNESCO World Heritage site.
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      Lut Desert, Shahdad, Kerman Province, Iran - 22/04/2017: Tourists watch the sun go down over yardangs in the Lut Desert in Shahad, Iran. Known as kaluts in Iran, yardangs are geological formations created by the dual action of wind and sand on rock. Lut is the world's 25th largest desert and a UNESCO World Heritage site.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Egg custard with yubu and sea urchin at Tenku Ryu-Gin.
Tenku Ryu-Gin is the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.Egg custard with yubu and sea urchin at Tenku Ryu-Gin.
Tenku Ryu-Gin is the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.
  • Deep fried ice fish with spring vegetables at Tenku Ryu-Gin.
Tenku Ryu-Gin is the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.Deep fried ice fish with spring vegetables at Tenku Ryu-Gin.
Tenku Ryu-Gin is the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.
  • Egg custard with yubu and sea urchin at Tenku Ryu-Gin.
Tenku Ryu-Gin is the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.Egg custard with yubu and sea urchin at Tenku Ryu-Gin.
Tenku Ryu-Gin is the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.
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      Hong Kong, China - 25/03/2013: Egg custard with yubu and sea urchin at Tenku Ryu-Gin. Tenku Ryu-Gin is the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • A novice monk walks past gilded doors at Wat Mai, an early 19th century temple in the World Heritage town of Luang Prabang in Laos.

A novice monk walks past gilded doors at Wat Mai, an early 19th century temple in the World Heritage town of Luang Prabang in Laos.
  • The view from the fort in Bandhavgarh National Park, the former home of the Royal family of Rawa and now a tiger sanctuary with the highest concentrations of tigers in India.  It is said that in years gone by, tigers in Bandhavgarh were so prolific it was considered an omen for the ruling Maharaja to kill 109 per lifetime in order to bring peace and prosperity to his people. Tiger numbers in India have fallen to critical levels in recent years; from 300,000 at the turn of the 20th century to a government estimated figure of 3,500 today (critics claim numbers are closer to 1,500 today. India maintains strict and regimental control over their many tiger parks, but despite this, numbers continue to fall. Many tigers are poached by villagers, as an adult can fetch up to US$20,000 on the black market. Indian farmers can expect to earn less than US$1000 a year.The view from the fort in Bandhavgarh National Park, the former home of the Royal family of Rawa and now a tiger sanctuary with the highest concentrations of tigers in India.  It is said that in years gone by, tigers in Bandhavgarh were so prolific it was considered an omen for the ruling Maharaja to kill 109 per lifetime in order to bring peace and prosperity to his people. Tiger numbers in India have fallen to critical levels in recent years; from 300,000 at the turn of the 20th century to a government estimated figure of 3,500 today (critics claim numbers are closer to 1,500 today. India maintains strict and regimental control over their many tiger parks, but despite this, numbers continue to fall. Many tigers are poached by villagers, as an adult can fetch up to US$20,000 on the black market. Indian farmers can expect to earn less than US$1000 a year.
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    • View more from 'India's Safari Lodges'
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      Mahdya Pradesh, India - 20/10/2007: The view from the fort in Bandhavgarh National Park, the former home of the Royal family of Rawa and now a tiger sanctuary with the highest concentrations of tigers in India. It is said that in years gone by, tigers in Bandhavgarh were so prolific it was considered an omen for the ruling Maharaja to kill 109 per lifetime in order to bring peace and prosperity to his people. Tiger numbers in India have fallen to critical levels in recent years; from 300,000 at the turn of the 20th century to a government estimated figure of 3,500 today (critics claim numbers are closer to 1,500 today. India maintains strict and regimental control over their many tiger parks, but despite this, numbers continue to fall. Many tigers are poached by villagers, as an adult can fetch up to US$20,000 on the black market. Indian farmers can expect to earn less than US$1000 a year.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • A study group for children inside the Po-i-Kalan Complex in Bukhara. Dating back to the 6th century, Bukhara is a living museum, with about 140 architectural monuments. Located on the Silk Road, Bukhara was an important center of trade, study, culture, and religion. The historical city centre is listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage SiteA study group for children inside the Po-i-Kalan Complex in Bukhara. Dating back to the 6th century, Bukhara is a living museum, with about 140 architectural monuments. Located on the Silk Road, Bukhara was an important center of trade, study, culture, and religion. The historical city centre is listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site
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      Bukhara, Bukhara Province, Uzbekistan - 04/03/2004: A study group for children inside the Po-i-Kalan Complex in Bukhara. Dating back to the 6th century, Bukhara is a living museum, with about 140 architectural monuments. Located on the Silk Road, Bukhara was an important center of trade, study, culture, and religion. The historical city centre is listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • A native Maldivian man hired to play a traditional drum when greeting guests to the Banyan Tree Resort and Spa in the Maldives.

Upmarket, the Banyan Tree is one of many new resorts gracing the many islands of the Maldivian archipelago, an all island country off the coast of southern India. Established a little over 30 years ago, tourism was deemed to fail. Back then, the country had little infrastructure to support tourism, with no telephones or airport- the only communication was through Morse code with Sri Lanka. The Maldives is now one of the trendiest destinations in the world. Importing all food stuffs, water and staff, paradise doesn't come cheap; a simple room at the Banyan Tree is selling for more than $800 in peak season.A native Maldivian man hired to play a traditional drum when greeting guests to the Banyan Tree Resort and Spa in the Maldives.

Upmarket, the Banyan Tree is one of many new resorts gracing the many islands of the Maldivian archipelago, an all island country off the coast of southern India. Established a little over 30 years ago, tourism was deemed to fail. Back then, the country had little infrastructure to support tourism, with no telephones or airport- the only communication was through Morse code with Sri Lanka. The Maldives is now one of the trendiest destinations in the world. Importing all food stuffs, water and staff, paradise doesn't come cheap; a simple room at the Banyan Tree is selling for more than $800 in peak season.
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      Banyan Tree, Maldives - 01/02/2005: A native Maldivian man hired to play a traditional drum when greeting guests to the Banyan Tree Resort and Spa in the Maldives. Upmarket, the Banyan Tree is one of many new resorts gracing the many islands of the Maldivian archipelago, an all island country off the coast of southern India. Established a little over 30 years ago, tourism was deemed to fail. Back then, the country had little infrastructure to support tourism, with no telephones or airport- the only communication was through Morse code with Sri Lanka. The Maldives is now one of the trendiest destinations in the world. Importing all food stuffs, water and staff, paradise doesn't come cheap; a simple room at the Banyan Tree is selling for more than $800 in peak season.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Inside the Umayyad Mosque in the Old Town of Damascus, Syria. Syria's main mosque was built in AD 705. A holy site for both Sunni and Shia muslims, it is also home to John the Baptist’s skull.  Trying hard to shrug off its reputation as a rogue state, Syria is now opening its doors to tourism, with visitor numbers expected to double to 12 million in the next four years. Damascus is known s the oldest constantly inhabited city on earth.Inside the Umayyad Mosque in the Old Town of Damascus, Syria. Syria's main mosque was built in AD 705. A holy site for both Sunni and Shia muslims, it is also home to John the Baptist’s skull.  Trying hard to shrug off its reputation as a rogue state, Syria is now opening its doors to tourism, with visitor numbers expected to double to 12 million in the next four years. Damascus is known s the oldest constantly inhabited city on earth.
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      Damascus, Syria - 30/03/2010: Inside the Umayyad Mosque in the Old Town of Damascus, Syria. Syria's main mosque was built in AD 705. A holy site for both Sunni and Shia muslims, it is also home to John the Baptist’s skull. Trying hard to shrug off its reputation as a rogue state, Syria is now opening its doors to tourism, with visitor numbers expected to double to 12 million in the next four years. Damascus is known s the oldest constantly inhabited city on earth.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • The view over Aleppo from the citadel, a large medieval fortified palace, before the civil war. It is built on top of a man-made earthen mound and the first fortifications date back to the third century BC. It became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1986.The view over Aleppo from the citadel, a large medieval fortified palace, before the civil war. It is built on top of a man-made earthen mound and the first fortifications date back to the third century BC. It became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1986.
  • A street scene in the old town of Aleppo before it was destroyed during the Syrian civil war. Aleppo is one of the oldest continuously inhabited places on earth; historians claim the site has been lived in for more than 8000 years. Its position at the cross-roads from Europe, Asia and Africa made it a strategic hub for trade.A street scene in the old town of Aleppo before it was destroyed during the Syrian civil war. Aleppo is one of the oldest continuously inhabited places on earth; historians claim the site has been lived in for more than 8000 years. Its position at the cross-roads from Europe, Asia and Africa made it a strategic hub for trade.
  • Landscape outside of the village of Göreme in the Cappadocia region in Turkey. This bizarre landscape was formed from compacted volcanic ash called "tuff" that smothered the land some 30 million years ago. Natural forces have since sculpted a wonderland of ridges, canyons and bizarre phallic protrusions known as fairy chimneys.Landscape outside of the village of Göreme in the Cappadocia region in Turkey. This bizarre landscape was formed from compacted volcanic ash called "tuff" that smothered the land some 30 million years ago. Natural forces have since sculpted a wonderland of ridges, canyons and bizarre phallic protrusions known as fairy chimneys.
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      Cappadocia, Göreme, Turkey - 17/04/2010: Landscape outside of the village of Göreme in the Cappadocia region in Turkey. This bizarre landscape was formed from compacted volcanic ash called "tuff" that smothered the land some 30 million years ago. Natural forces have since sculpted a wonderland of ridges, canyons and bizarre phallic protrusions known as fairy chimneys.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Inside the central cupola at Umaid Bhawan palace. With 76 guest rooms, Jodhpur's Art Deco palace Umaid Bhawan is reportedly one of the largest residencies in the world. Architected by Henry Vaughan Lanchester, the facade mirrors the main temple of Cambodia's Angkor Wat, but with colonial-era wings, Art Deco interiors and a central cupola guarded by stuffed leopards - a mishmash of styles influencing its 1940's beginning. The palace was reportedly built to provide labour during a famine.

Fresh from a $15 million facelift, Taj Hotels and Resorts have recently returned the palace to its original magnificence, plus adding marble bath-tubs and period furniture to all the rooms, a new pool overlooking the ruins of Mehrangarh Fort, and a new basement spa. Inside the central cupola at Umaid Bhawan palace. With 76 guest rooms, Jodhpur's Art Deco palace Umaid Bhawan is reportedly one of the largest residencies in the world. Architected by Henry Vaughan Lanchester, the facade mirrors the main temple of Cambodia's Angkor Wat, but with colonial-era wings, Art Deco interiors and a central cupola guarded by stuffed leopards - a mishmash of styles influencing its 1940's beginning. The palace was reportedly built to provide labour during a famine.

Fresh from a $15 million facelift, Taj Hotels and Resorts have recently returned the palace to its original magnificence, plus adding marble bath-tubs and period furniture to all the rooms, a new pool overlooking the ruins of Mehrangarh Fort, and a new basement spa.
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      Jodphur, rajasthan, India - 15/10/2008: Inside the central cupola at Umaid Bhawan palace. With 76 guest rooms, Jodhpur's Art Deco palace Umaid Bhawan is reportedly one of the largest residencies in the world. Architected by Henry Vaughan Lanchester, the facade mirrors the main temple of Cambodia's Angkor Wat, but with colonial-era wings, Art Deco interiors and a central cupola guarded by stuffed leopards - a mishmash of styles influencing its 1940's beginning. The palace was reportedly built to provide labour during a famine. Fresh from a $15 million facelift, Taj Hotels and Resorts have recently returned the palace to its original magnificence, plus adding marble bath-tubs and period furniture to all the rooms, a new pool overlooking the ruins of Mehrangarh Fort, and a new basement spa.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • A young busker girl dancing to traditional folk music played by her father outside of Mehranghar Fort in Jodphur. Called the 'Citadel of the Sun', Rudyard Kipling once wrote of the fort that 'it was the work of giants and angels'. A stunning and spectacular 15th century building that overlooks and protects the city of Jodphur, Mehranghar Fort has recently been restored by its traditional owner, the Maharaja of Jodphur, and opened as a museum. It is the best example of fort restoration in Rajasthan.A young busker girl dancing to traditional folk music played by her father outside of Mehranghar Fort in Jodphur. Called the 'Citadel of the Sun', Rudyard Kipling once wrote of the fort that 'it was the work of giants and angels'. A stunning and spectacular 15th century building that overlooks and protects the city of Jodphur, Mehranghar Fort has recently been restored by its traditional owner, the Maharaja of Jodphur, and opened as a museum. It is the best example of fort restoration in Rajasthan.
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      Jodphur, Rajasthan, India - 01/04/2003: A young busker girl dancing to traditional folk music played by her father outside of Mehranghar Fort in Jodphur. Called the 'Citadel of the Sun', Rudyard Kipling once wrote of the fort that 'it was the work of giants and angels'. A stunning and spectacular 15th century building that overlooks and protects the city of Jodphur, Mehranghar Fort has recently been restored by its traditional owner, the Maharaja of Jodphur, and opened as a museum. It is the best example of fort restoration in Rajasthan.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Eagle hunter Saginbai and one of his eagles in Bokonbaevo village on the shores of lake Issyk Kul in Kyrgyzstan. Hunting with eagles is a traditional sport of the Eurasian steppes.Eagle hunter Saginbai and one of his eagles in Bokonbaevo village on the shores of lake Issyk Kul in Kyrgyzstan. Hunting with eagles is a traditional sport of the Eurasian steppes.
  • Elephant with its strapper, Rajasthan, India.Elephant with its strapper, Rajasthan, India.
  • A husband and wife whisper prayers and offerings into the ears of a bull statue at the Meenakshi Amman temple in Madurai, Tamil Nadu.A husband and wife whisper prayers and offerings into the ears of a bull statue at the Meenakshi Amman temple in Madurai, Tamil Nadu.
  • A man washes a government owned local passenger bus in the Vang Vieng river, Laos. 


Famous for its picturesque limestone outcrop mountains and abundance of caves, Vang Vieng has become one of the most popular backpacker destinations in Laos.  Guest houses and hotels have increased from three in 1998 to over 100 four years later.A man washes a government owned local passenger bus in the Vang Vieng river, Laos. 


Famous for its picturesque limestone outcrop mountains and abundance of caves, Vang Vieng has become one of the most popular backpacker destinations in Laos.  Guest houses and hotels have increased from three in 1998 to over 100 four years later.
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      Vang Vieng, Laos - 01/04/1999: A man washes a government owned local passenger bus in the Vang Vieng river, Laos. Famous for its picturesque limestone outcrop mountains and abundance of caves, Vang Vieng has become one of the most popular backpacker destinations in Laos. Guest houses and hotels have increased from three in 1998 to over 100 four years later.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • An actor of Sichuan Opera applying his makeup at the Bashu theatre, the only active theatre house in Chengdu that caters for local people. Most of Sichuan's opera houses have been closed, or open only for tourists at high prices -usually 120 Yuan or 15 $ a ticket, whereas the Bashu theatre charges 10 Yuan. The dramatic stories contain strong moral flavours. In spite of a young cast, only the older generation now watches the opera.

Credit: Leisa Tyler/Asiaworksphotos.com
Contact: sales@asiaworksphotos.com

Legal Notice: Any use of this picture is subject to a license agreement entered into by the user and AsiaWorks Photography Ltd. All other rights reserved. Any re-use and redistribution of this image is prohibited. For sales enquiries regarding any additional use of this or other pictures from AsiaWorks Photography please contact sales@asiaworksphotos.comAn actor of Sichuan Opera applying his makeup at the Bashu theatre, the only active theatre house in Chengdu that caters for local people. Most of Sichuan's opera houses have been closed, or open only for tourists at high prices -usually 120 Yuan or 15 $ a ticket, whereas the Bashu theatre charges 10 Yuan. The dramatic stories contain strong moral flavours. In spite of a young cast, only the older generation now watches the opera.

Credit: Leisa Tyler/Asiaworksphotos.com
Contact: sales@asiaworksphotos.com

Legal Notice: Any use of this picture is subject to a license agreement entered into by the user and AsiaWorks Photography Ltd. All other rights reserved. Any re-use and redistribution of this image is prohibited. For sales enquiries regarding any additional use of this or other pictures from AsiaWorks Photography please contact sales@asiaworksphotos.com
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      Chengdu, Sichuan, China - 01/08/2003: An actor of Sichuan Opera applying his makeup at the Bashu theatre, the only active theatre house in Chengdu that caters for local people. Most of Sichuan's opera houses have been closed, or open only for tourists at high prices -usually 120 Yuan or 15 $ a ticket, whereas the Bashu theatre charges 10 Yuan. The dramatic stories contain strong moral flavours. In spite of a young cast, only the older generation now watches the opera. Credit: Leisa Tyler/Asiaworksphotos.com Contact: sales@asiaworksphotos.com Legal Notice: Any use of this picture is subject to a license agreement entered into by the user and AsiaWorks Photography Ltd. All other rights reserved. Any re-use and redistribution of this image is prohibited. For sales enquiries regarding any additional use of this or other pictures from AsiaWorks Photography please contact sales@asiaworksphotos.com
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • A shepherd boy and his horse in central Kyrgyzstan. Sitting over 2000 meters and covered in snow in winter, in summer the transhumance Kyrgyz move to the mountains and set up yurts, or use caravans, as second homes to graze their livestock. While the Kyrgyz semi-nomadic existence wasn't abolished during the country's Soviet period, it has experienced a resurgent since independence due to economic hardship.A shepherd boy and his horse in central Kyrgyzstan. Sitting over 2000 meters and covered in snow in winter, in summer the transhumance Kyrgyz move to the mountains and set up yurts, or use caravans, as second homes to graze their livestock. While the Kyrgyz semi-nomadic existence wasn't abolished during the country's Soviet period, it has experienced a resurgent since independence due to economic hardship.
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      Naryn, Kyrgyzstan - June 2005: A shepherd boy and his horse in central Kyrgyzstan. Sitting over 2000 meters and covered in snow in winter, in summer the transhumance Kyrgyz move to the mountains and set up yurts, or use caravans, as second homes to graze their livestock. While the Kyrgyz semi-nomadic existence wasn't abolished during the country's Soviet period, it has experienced a resurgent since independence due to economic hardship.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • A young nomad girl in her family's yurt in central Kyrgyzstan. Sitting over 2000 meters and covered in snow in winter, in summer the transhumance Kyrgyz move to the mountains and set up yurts, or jailoo, or use caravans, as second homes and graze their livestock. While the Kyrgyz semi-nomadic existence wasn't abolished during the country's Soviet period, it has experienced a resurgent since independence due to economic hardship.A young nomad girl in her family's yurt in central Kyrgyzstan. Sitting over 2000 meters and covered in snow in winter, in summer the transhumance Kyrgyz move to the mountains and set up yurts, or jailoo, or use caravans, as second homes and graze their livestock. While the Kyrgyz semi-nomadic existence wasn't abolished during the country's Soviet period, it has experienced a resurgent since independence due to economic hardship.
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      Naryn, Kyrgyzstan - June 2005: A young nomad girl in her family's yurt in central Kyrgyzstan. Sitting over 2000 meters and covered in snow in winter, in summer the transhumance Kyrgyz move to the mountains and set up yurts, or jailoo, or use caravans, as second homes and graze their livestock. While the Kyrgyz semi-nomadic existence wasn't abolished during the country's Soviet period, it has experienced a resurgent since independence due to economic hardship.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • A section of the spectacular Longji - Dragon’s Backbone Rice Terraces at Ping’An, Longshen County. Cut into the contours of the land and operated by manmade aquifers and dykes, it is said that when the terraces are filled with water during spring, they resemble the back-bone of a dragon. Construction on the terraces began during the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368) and continued until the early Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). They became a World Heritage site in 1987. 
The terraces were built by Zhuang and Yao minority people, who still live in the area. Zhuang women are famed for their long black hair and colourful clothing.A section of the spectacular Longji - Dragon’s Backbone Rice Terraces at Ping’An, Longshen County. Cut into the contours of the land and operated by manmade aquifers and dykes, it is said that when the terraces are filled with water during spring, they resemble the back-bone of a dragon. Construction on the terraces began during the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368) and continued until the early Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). They became a World Heritage site in 1987. 
The terraces were built by Zhuang and Yao minority people, who still live in the area. Zhuang women are famed for their long black hair and colourful clothing.
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      Longsheng, Guangxi, China - 27/09/2000: A section of the spectacular Longji - Dragon’s Backbone Rice Terraces at Ping’An, Longshen County. Cut into the contours of the land and operated by manmade aquifers and dykes, it is said that when the terraces are filled with water during spring, they resemble the back-bone of a dragon. Construction on the terraces began during the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368) and continued until the early Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). They became a World Heritage site in 1987. The terraces were built by Zhuang and Yao minority people, who still live in the area. Zhuang women are famed for their long black hair and colourful clothing.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • A Huon pine bath tub on the balcony of  Rocky Hills, a fire-proof luxury villa accommodation in Swansea, designed by Craig Rosevear. Made of concrete, the property flanks the edge of the heavily forested hillside, with floor to ceiling glass windows with views over Maria Island. Off the grid, Rocky Hills is run on a 15,000 watt solar system, with double glazed windows for insulation and rain water tanks.A Huon pine bath tub on the balcony of  Rocky Hills, a fire-proof luxury villa accommodation in Swansea, designed by Craig Rosevear. Made of concrete, the property flanks the edge of the heavily forested hillside, with floor to ceiling glass windows with views over Maria Island. Off the grid, Rocky Hills is run on a 15,000 watt solar system, with double glazed windows for insulation and rain water tanks.
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      Tasmania, Australia - 07/12/2010: A Huon pine bath tub on the balcony of Rocky Hills, a fire-proof luxury villa accommodation in Swansea, designed by Craig Rosevear. Made of concrete, the property flanks the edge of the heavily forested hillside, with floor to ceiling glass windows with views over Maria Island. Off the grid, Rocky Hills is run on a 15,000 watt solar system, with double glazed windows for insulation and rain water tanks.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Trekkers look to the top of a giant camphor tree on the Kumano Kodo trail, a World Heritage listed pilgrim trail on the Kii Peninsula in Japan. 
A thousand years ago, in the heyday of the Japanese imperial court, royals and nobles would embark on weeks-long treks to pray at the three principle Shinto-Buddhist shrines at the heart of Kumano, a rugged swath of the Kii Peninsula in southernmost Honshu. Dressed in the white of the dead, they would pray to the smaller subsidiary shrines, or oji, that marked the way, as well as to the trees and rocks themselves. Trekking the Kumano Kodo, as the network of trails was named, was as much a purification rite as a celebration of nature. 
After years of obscurity following Japan's modernisation, in 2004 the Kumano Kodo received World Heritage listing, one of only two pilgrimage routes in the world with this title (the other is Spain’s Way of St. James). It has helped fuel a revival along the trail, restoring the tracks and temples and bringing money to Japan's ailing rural population.
Camphor trees along the Kuamo Kodo are often more than 1000 years old and regarded as sacred sitesTrekkers look to the top of a giant camphor tree on the Kumano Kodo trail, a World Heritage listed pilgrim trail on the Kii Peninsula in Japan. 
A thousand years ago, in the heyday of the Japanese imperial court, royals and nobles would embark on weeks-long treks to pray at the three principle Shinto-Buddhist shrines at the heart of Kumano, a rugged swath of the Kii Peninsula in southernmost Honshu. Dressed in the white of the dead, they would pray to the smaller subsidiary shrines, or oji, that marked the way, as well as to the trees and rocks themselves. Trekking the Kumano Kodo, as the network of trails was named, was as much a purification rite as a celebration of nature. 
After years of obscurity following Japan's modernisation, in 2004 the Kumano Kodo received World Heritage listing, one of only two pilgrimage routes in the world with this title (the other is Spain’s Way of St. James). It has helped fuel a revival along the trail, restoring the tracks and temples and bringing money to Japan's ailing rural population.
Camphor trees along the Kuamo Kodo are often more than 1000 years old and regarded as sacred sites
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      Wakayama, Japan - 19/03/2013: Trekkers look to the top of a giant camphor tree on the Kumano Kodo trail, a World Heritage listed pilgrim trail on the Kii Peninsula in Japan. A thousand years ago, in the heyday of the Japanese imperial court, royals and nobles would embark on weeks-long treks to pray at the three principle Shinto-Buddhist shrines at the heart of Kumano, a rugged swath of the Kii Peninsula in southernmost Honshu. Dressed in the white of the dead, they would pray to the smaller subsidiary shrines, or oji, that marked the way, as well as to the trees and rocks themselves. Trekking the Kumano Kodo, as the network of trails was named, was as much a purification rite as a celebration of nature. After years of obscurity following Japan's modernisation, in 2004 the Kumano Kodo received World Heritage listing, one of only two pilgrimage routes in the world with this title (the other is Spain’s Way of St. James). It has helped fuel a revival along the trail, restoring the tracks and temples and bringing money to Japan's ailing rural population. Camphor trees along the Kuamo Kodo are often more than 1000 years old and regarded as sacred sites
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • In a taxi driving past Burra Bazar, otherwise known as Bara Bazar, and one of India's biggest wholesale markets. Situated in central Kolkata, the market dates back to the 17th century and attracts 50,000 merchants a day.In a taxi driving past Burra Bazar, otherwise known as Bara Bazar, and one of India's biggest wholesale markets. Situated in central Kolkata, the market dates back to the 17th century and attracts 50,000 merchants a day.
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      Kolkata, India - 27/11/2013: In a taxi driving past Burra Bazar, otherwise known as Bara Bazar, and one of India's biggest wholesale markets. Situated in central Kolkata, the market dates back to the 17th century and attracts 50,000 merchants a day.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • An ayurvedic panchakarma patient receiving a massage at the Coconut Lagoon Resort in Kerala, India. Ayurveda is a 5,000-year old holistic discipline promoting health and longevity through yoga, meditation, diet and treatment. Although more focused on preventing rather than curing disease, ayurveda does include passive and organic treatments (especially massage) for illness. Spurred on by the recent spa tourism boom ayurveda, which is traditionally practiced in sanatoriums, has experienced a renaissance in recent years.  In Kerala, South India, dozens of resorts have opened their doors . Offering short and basic programs, many doctors feel that the resorts are not providing genuine ayurdvedic treatments and are undermining the authenticity of the practice.An ayurvedic panchakarma patient receiving a massage at the Coconut Lagoon Resort in Kerala, India. Ayurveda is a 5,000-year old holistic discipline promoting health and longevity through yoga, meditation, diet and treatment. Although more focused on preventing rather than curing disease, ayurveda does include passive and organic treatments (especially massage) for illness. Spurred on by the recent spa tourism boom ayurveda, which is traditionally practiced in sanatoriums, has experienced a renaissance in recent years.  In Kerala, South India, dozens of resorts have opened their doors . Offering short and basic programs, many doctors feel that the resorts are not providing genuine ayurdvedic treatments and are undermining the authenticity of the practice.
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      Allappey, Kerala, India - 01/05/2003: An ayurvedic panchakarma patient receiving a massage at the Coconut Lagoon Resort in Kerala, India. Ayurveda is a 5,000-year old holistic discipline promoting health and longevity through yoga, meditation, diet and treatment. Although more focused on preventing rather than curing disease, ayurveda does include passive and organic treatments (especially massage) for illness. Spurred on by the recent spa tourism boom ayurveda, which is traditionally practiced in sanatoriums, has experienced a renaissance in recent years. In Kerala, South India, dozens of resorts have opened their doors . Offering short and basic programs, many doctors feel that the resorts are not providing genuine ayurdvedic treatments and are undermining the authenticity of the practice.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • The Gateway of India in Mumbai at dawn. Located on the waterfront in the Apollo Bunder area in South Mumbai and overlooking the Arabian Sea, the structure was built by the British colonialists to commemorate the visit of King George V and Queen Mary to India. It later became a landing place for British governors and other prominent people. It is now a prominent tourist attraction.The Gateway of India in Mumbai at dawn. Located on the waterfront in the Apollo Bunder area in South Mumbai and overlooking the Arabian Sea, the structure was built by the British colonialists to commemorate the visit of King George V and Queen Mary to India. It later became a landing place for British governors and other prominent people. It is now a prominent tourist attraction.
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      Mumbai, India - 06/12/2010: The Gateway of India in Mumbai at dawn. Located on the waterfront in the Apollo Bunder area in South Mumbai and overlooking the Arabian Sea, the structure was built by the British colonialists to commemorate the visit of King George V and Queen Mary to India. It later became a landing place for British governors and other prominent people. It is now a prominent tourist attraction.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Buddhist statues gracing the Pak Ao Caves.  They are two limestone caves jutting into a cliff face on the Mekong River near Luang Prabang.  


Made auspicious by local monks, the caves are filled with hundreds and hundreds of standing Buddhas.  Monks offer the statues as homage to the river so that travellers on its waters may be safe.Buddhist statues gracing the Pak Ao Caves.  They are two limestone caves jutting into a cliff face on the Mekong River near Luang Prabang.  


Made auspicious by local monks, the caves are filled with hundreds and hundreds of standing Buddhas.  Monks offer the statues as homage to the river so that travellers on its waters may be safe.
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      Luang Prabang, Luang Prabang, Laos - 01/01/2001: Buddhist statues gracing the Pak Ao Caves. They are two limestone caves jutting into a cliff face on the Mekong River near Luang Prabang. Made auspicious by local monks, the caves are filled with hundreds and hundreds of standing Buddhas. Monks offer the statues as homage to the river so that travellers on its waters may be safe.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Kuroge wagyu beef with white asparagus and morel mushrooms at Tenku Ryu-Gin. Tenku Ryu-Gin is the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.Kuroge wagyu beef with white asparagus and morel mushrooms at Tenku Ryu-Gin. Tenku Ryu-Gin is the fine dining kaiseki restaurant of Seiji Yamamoto in Hong Kong. Mr Yamamoto is the chef of Nihonryori RyuGin in Tokyo, which has three Michelin stars and ranks on the World's 50 Best Restaurants.
  • A young Yi ethnic woman smoking a cigarette in Yunnan province, China.A young Yi ethnic woman smoking a cigarette in Yunnan province, China.
  • Yi women at a wedding in a small village in the mountains above Weixi in Yunnan province, China. The marriage of their sister and cousin to the boy next door was arranged 15 years prior to the day; they have been celebrating for three days straight, feasting on yam, boiled barley bread, pig and biajio- fire like rice wine. 

Aristocratic, before Chinese Liberation, Yi society was based on slavery - stealing from other minority groups a common practice. Feared for their fierce sense of independence and barbaric customs, the Yi were also one of China's wealthiest minorities, later making their money from the region's profuse logging trade.

There are more than 7 million Yi in China, mostly situated in the provinces of Yunnan and southern Sichuan; they are now one of China's most disadvantaged ethnic groups.Yi women at a wedding in a small village in the mountains above Weixi in Yunnan province, China. The marriage of their sister and cousin to the boy next door was arranged 15 years prior to the day; they have been celebrating for three days straight, feasting on yam, boiled barley bread, pig and biajio- fire like rice wine. 

Aristocratic, before Chinese Liberation, Yi society was based on slavery - stealing from other minority groups a common practice. Feared for their fierce sense of independence and barbaric customs, the Yi were also one of China's wealthiest minorities, later making their money from the region's profuse logging trade.

There are more than 7 million Yi in China, mostly situated in the provinces of Yunnan and southern Sichuan; they are now one of China's most disadvantaged ethnic groups.
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      Weixi, Yunnan, China - 01/11/2004: Yi women at a wedding in a small village in the mountains above Weixi in Yunnan province, China. The marriage of their sister and cousin to the boy next door was arranged 15 years prior to the day; they have been celebrating for three days straight, feasting on yam, boiled barley bread, pig and biajio- fire like rice wine. Aristocratic, before Chinese Liberation, Yi society was based on slavery - stealing from other minority groups a common practice. Feared for their fierce sense of independence and barbaric customs, the Yi were also one of China's wealthiest minorities, later making their money from the region's profuse logging trade. There are more than 7 million Yi in China, mostly situated in the provinces of Yunnan and southern Sichuan; they are now one of China's most disadvantaged ethnic groups.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • A young man carrying a tray of freshly baked bread past a minaret in Samarkand, Uzbekistan. Built approximately 4000 years ago, Samarkand was an important city on the Silk Road between China and the West. It was also an Islamic centre for scholarly study. In the 14th century it became the capital of the empire of Timur (Tamerlane) and is the site of his mausoleum (the Gur-e Amir).  It is a UNESCO listed World Heritage site as a crossroad of cultures.A young man carrying a tray of freshly baked bread past a minaret in Samarkand, Uzbekistan. Built approximately 4000 years ago, Samarkand was an important city on the Silk Road between China and the West. It was also an Islamic centre for scholarly study. In the 14th century it became the capital of the empire of Timur (Tamerlane) and is the site of his mausoleum (the Gur-e Amir).  It is a UNESCO listed World Heritage site as a crossroad of cultures.
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      Samarkand, Uzbekistan - 09/03/2004: A young man carrying a tray of freshly baked bread past a minaret in Samarkand, Uzbekistan. Built approximately 4000 years ago, Samarkand was an important city on the Silk Road between China and the West. It was also an Islamic centre for scholarly study. In the 14th century it became the capital of the empire of Timur (Tamerlane) and is the site of his mausoleum (the Gur-e Amir). It is a UNESCO listed World Heritage site as a crossroad of cultures.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • A monastery near Muktinath on the Annapurna Circuit. It's considered one of the most diverse trekking trails in the world; the Annapurna circuit passes an immense array of landscapes, from the lush green foothills of the Himalayas to the 5400 meter Thorung La pass and the moonscape of Mustang, a former Tibetan kingdom on a treeless plateau.
Asia's most popular trekking trail, the Annapurna circuit has come under immense pressure in recent years with the construction of a road along the old trekking route. The road brings vital access and goods and services to the villagers, some who previously lived up to a week's walk from the nearest road head, but destroyed the tranquility of the mountains for trekkers, and hindered much needed tourism.
Hoping to balance the best of both worlds, the ACAP (Annapurna Conservation Area Project, the government body who oversea the trail) have been busy building side trails through new villages and on upper levels of mountain ranges, allowing trekkers to still access Asia's most loved trail and its sunning wilderness, without the jeep dust.A monastery near Muktinath on the Annapurna Circuit. It's considered one of the most diverse trekking trails in the world; the Annapurna circuit passes an immense array of landscapes, from the lush green foothills of the Himalayas to the 5400 meter Thorung La pass and the moonscape of Mustang, a former Tibetan kingdom on a treeless plateau.
Asia's most popular trekking trail, the Annapurna circuit has come under immense pressure in recent years with the construction of a road along the old trekking route. The road brings vital access and goods and services to the villagers, some who previously lived up to a week's walk from the nearest road head, but destroyed the tranquility of the mountains for trekkers, and hindered much needed tourism.
Hoping to balance the best of both worlds, the ACAP (Annapurna Conservation Area Project, the government body who oversea the trail) have been busy building side trails through new villages and on upper levels of mountain ranges, allowing trekkers to still access Asia's most loved trail and its sunning wilderness, without the jeep dust.
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      Annapurna, Nepal - 27/12/2013: A monastery near Muktinath on the Annapurna Circuit. It's considered one of the most diverse trekking trails in the world; the Annapurna circuit passes an immense array of landscapes, from the lush green foothills of the Himalayas to the 5400 meter Thorung La pass and the moonscape of Mustang, a former Tibetan kingdom on a treeless plateau. Asia's most popular trekking trail, the Annapurna circuit has come under immense pressure in recent years with the construction of a road along the old trekking route. The road brings vital access and goods and services to the villagers, some who previously lived up to a week's walk from the nearest road head, but destroyed the tranquility of the mountains for trekkers, and hindered much needed tourism. Hoping to balance the best of both worlds, the ACAP (Annapurna Conservation Area Project, the government body who oversea the trail) have been busy building side trails through new villages and on upper levels of mountain ranges, allowing trekkers to still access Asia's most loved trail and its sunning wilderness, without the jeep dust.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Prayer flags infront of Mount Kanchendzonga.Prayer flags infront of Mount Kanchendzonga.
  • A kebab stall in the old town of Kashgar, the ancient Silk Road hub on the edge of the Taklamakan Desert in Western China. Kashgar is the last city in Xingiang where the Uigurs have not become a minority.  The Uighur homeland was occupied by Chinese forces during the mid 1900's and is rapidly being "liberated" through mass development and tax incentives offered to millions of Han Chinese to move into the region.A kebab stall in the old town of Kashgar, the ancient Silk Road hub on the edge of the Taklamakan Desert in Western China. Kashgar is the last city in Xingiang where the Uigurs have not become a minority.  The Uighur homeland was occupied by Chinese forces during the mid 1900's and is rapidly being "liberated" through mass development and tax incentives offered to millions of Han Chinese to move into the region.
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      Kashgar, Xingiang, China - 01/08/2002: A kebab stall in the old town of Kashgar, the ancient Silk Road hub on the edge of the Taklamakan Desert in Western China. Kashgar is the last city in Xingiang where the Uigurs have not become a minority. The Uighur homeland was occupied by Chinese forces during the mid 1900's and is rapidly being "liberated" through mass development and tax incentives offered to millions of Han Chinese to move into the region.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Birds fly above the Khiva skyline at sunset. Founded in the 6th century, Khiva is a beautiful preserved city in between the Kyzylkum and Karakum deserts in Western Uzbekistan. Restored by the Soviet's in the 1970's, the town has a clean, museum feel. Located 500 kilometers from Bukhara and the Silk Road, Khiva was best known for its long and brutal history as a slave trading post.Birds fly above the Khiva skyline at sunset. Founded in the 6th century, Khiva is a beautiful preserved city in between the Kyzylkum and Karakum deserts in Western Uzbekistan. Restored by the Soviet's in the 1970's, the town has a clean, museum feel. Located 500 kilometers from Bukhara and the Silk Road, Khiva was best known for its long and brutal history as a slave trading post.
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      Khiva, Uzbekistan - 02/03/2004: Birds fly above the Khiva skyline at sunset. Founded in the 6th century, Khiva is a beautiful preserved city in between the Kyzylkum and Karakum deserts in Western Uzbekistan. Restored by the Soviet's in the 1970's, the town has a clean, museum feel. Located 500 kilometers from Bukhara and the Silk Road, Khiva was best known for its long and brutal history as a slave trading post.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Village children in a street lined with mansions of Kandakuthan, once a prosperous village, now a ghost town in the Chettinad region of Tamil Nadu. Numbering more than 60,000, Chettinad's mansions were built by a tribe of people called the Nagarathars, bankers and merchants who made their fortunes ferrying teak, marble and lacquer, amongst other things, around Asia during the height of the British Raj. Requisitioned during World War 11 and unable to make a living from the desert, many abandoned their stately properties, relocating to the nearby city of Madras instead. Now unable or reluctant to pay for the upkeep of their family estates, many owners are taking apart their heirlooms – each, heavy with more than 300 tones of black teak, hand painted tiles, British iron and Danish glass - selling them into the antique shops of Jodphur and Bombay. Antique dealers believe that Chettinad’s once wealth of mansions will drop to less than 20% in the next ten years. Some Chettiars are hoping that tourism, namely converting the mansions into boutique hotels, and museums, will help to save the regions exquisite heritage.Village children in a street lined with mansions of Kandakuthan, once a prosperous village, now a ghost town in the Chettinad region of Tamil Nadu. Numbering more than 60,000, Chettinad's mansions were built by a tribe of people called the Nagarathars, bankers and merchants who made their fortunes ferrying teak, marble and lacquer, amongst other things, around Asia during the height of the British Raj. Requisitioned during World War 11 and unable to make a living from the desert, many abandoned their stately properties, relocating to the nearby city of Madras instead. Now unable or reluctant to pay for the upkeep of their family estates, many owners are taking apart their heirlooms – each, heavy with more than 300 tones of black teak, hand painted tiles, British iron and Danish glass - selling them into the antique shops of Jodphur and Bombay. Antique dealers believe that Chettinad’s once wealth of mansions will drop to less than 20% in the next ten years. Some Chettiars are hoping that tourism, namely converting the mansions into boutique hotels, and museums, will help to save the regions exquisite heritage.
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      Kanadukathan, India - 01/08/2006: Village children in a street lined with mansions of Kandakuthan, once a prosperous village, now a ghost town in the Chettinad region of Tamil Nadu. Numbering more than 60,000, Chettinad's mansions were built by a tribe of people called the Nagarathars, bankers and merchants who made their fortunes ferrying teak, marble and lacquer, amongst other things, around Asia during the height of the British Raj. Requisitioned during World War 11 and unable to make a living from the desert, many abandoned their stately properties, relocating to the nearby city of Madras instead. Now unable or reluctant to pay for the upkeep of their family estates, many owners are taking apart their heirlooms – each, heavy with more than 300 tones of black teak, hand painted tiles, British iron and Danish glass - selling them into the antique shops of Jodphur and Bombay. Antique dealers believe that Chettinad’s once wealth of mansions will drop to less than 20% in the next ten years. Some Chettiars are hoping that tourism, namely converting the mansions into boutique hotels, and museums, will help to save the regions exquisite heritage.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler
  • Children going to school near Samagaon, 8 days walking from the trailhead at Arughat Bazaar on the Manaslu Circuit. The 16-day Manaslu Circuit is part of the Great Himalaya Trail (GHT), a series of trekking trails developed by Dutch aid agency, SNV, together with the Nepalese government, which crosses Nepal from East to West and when finished aims to cover 8000 kilometres across the Himalayas.  Around 85% of trekkers to Nepal - approximately 100,000 people per year – walk in the country's three most established areas- Annapurna, Everest and Langtang.  Around 45% of people living in Nepal’s mountains live below the poverty line. The GHT hopes that by opening new walking trails tourism can become a tool for poverty alleviation.Children going to school near Samagaon, 8 days walking from the trailhead at Arughat Bazaar on the Manaslu Circuit. The 16-day Manaslu Circuit is part of the Great Himalaya Trail (GHT), a series of trekking trails developed by Dutch aid agency, SNV, together with the Nepalese government, which crosses Nepal from East to West and when finished aims to cover 8000 kilometres across the Himalayas.  Around 85% of trekkers to Nepal - approximately 100,000 people per year – walk in the country's three most established areas- Annapurna, Everest and Langtang.  Around 45% of people living in Nepal’s mountains live below the poverty line. The GHT hopes that by opening new walking trails tourism can become a tool for poverty alleviation.
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      Nepal - 14/04/2012: Children going to school near Samagaon, 8 days walking from the trailhead at Arughat Bazaar on the Manaslu Circuit. The 16-day Manaslu Circuit is part of the Great Himalaya Trail (GHT), a series of trekking trails developed by Dutch aid agency, SNV, together with the Nepalese government, which crosses Nepal from East to West and when finished aims to cover 8000 kilometres across the Himalayas. Around 85% of trekkers to Nepal - approximately 100,000 people per year – walk in the country's three most established areas- Annapurna, Everest and Langtang. Around 45% of people living in Nepal’s mountains live below the poverty line. The GHT hopes that by opening new walking trails tourism can become a tool for poverty alleviation.
      Credit: Leisa Tyler

 

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