A refugee boy trying to protect his makeshift home from the rain in Kutupalong newly expanded camp on March 6, 2017 in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. About 70,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled to Bangladesh from Myanmar since October 9, 2016 after the Burmese military launched clearance operations in response to an attack on border police. There are more than 30,000 registered refugees in Bangladesh but authorities estimate that 300,000 to 500,000 unregistered Rohingya are also already living here. As a result, most of these unregistered refugees are suffering. Basic food, medical care and safety are not available in these camps.
Mohammad Shafi (55) lost his leg during the recent violence over Muslims in Myanmar, is being carried on bamboo to the hospital due to lack of transportation in Kutupalong refugee camp on March 6, 2017, Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Burmese army shot his leg while he was working in a paddy field. About 70,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled to Bangladesh from Myanmar since October 9, 2016 after the Burmese military launched clearance operations in response to an attack on border police. There are more than 30,000 registered refugees in Bangladesh but authorities estimate that 300,000 to 500,000 unregistered Rohingya are also already living here. As a result, most of these unregistered refugees are suffering. Basic food, medical care and safety are not available in these camps.

Rohingya Refugees in Bangladesh

About 70,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled to Bangladesh from Myanmar since October 9, 2016 after the Burmese military launched clearance operations in response to an attack on border police. The U.N. human rights office said in a report that Myanmar's security forces had committed mass killings, torture and gang rapes of Rohingya Muslims and burned their villages. Since 1992, about 32,000 registered Rohingya have been living in two United Nations camps near Cox’s Bazar, but estimates of unregistered refugees range from 200,000 to 500,000. Many of them live in two sprawling makeshift shelters close to the official camps, while others are scattered across southeast Bangladesh. As a result, most of these unregistered refugees are suffering. Basic food, medical care and safety are not available in these camps, thus creating an insecure and vulnerable life. While the Bangladeshi government has been accommodating to a certain point, considering their limited resources and the poor conditions their own population live under, they are not able to resolve the issues alone. The Rohingya issue has been a long-standing problem, but unfortunately the international community has been mute and has not taken a strong role to help resolve this problem. This chronic refugee crisis for the Rohingya is long overdue for a solution.

 

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