Cambodia's Slow Train
Jerry Redfern
Travelling by train in Cambodia is a slow affair at best. It takes 14 hours to make the 300-kilometer trip west from the capital Phnom Penh to Battambang, if you’re lucky. Still the route less travelled for adventurous tourists, it remains the main mode of transportation for the poorest of the poor. The rolling stock, mostly cast offs from various European railroads, is now dilapidated, bullet-scarred and the locomotives often break down. After years of turmoil almost none of the foreign investment that is pouring into the country has gone to refurbish this basic transport link.

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  • A Buddhist monk chats with a fellow passenger as they wait for the start of the 14-hour train ride through the countryside between Phnom Penh and Battambang. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.A Buddhist monk chats with a fellow passenger as they wait for the start of the 14-hour train ride through the countryside between Phnom Penh and Battambang. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: A Buddhist monk chats with a fellow passenger as they wait for the start of the 14-hour train ride through the countryside between Phnom Penh and Battambang. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • A fruit seller waits for the start of the 14-hour train ride through the countryside between Phnom Penh and Battambang. There is no cafe car on the train - people must bring what they want or hope for sellers like this woman.

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.A fruit seller waits for the start of the 14-hour train ride through the countryside between Phnom Penh and Battambang. There is no cafe car on the train - people must bring what they want or hope for sellers like this woman.

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: A fruit seller waits for the start of the 14-hour train ride through the countryside between Phnom Penh and Battambang. There is no cafe car on the train - people must bring what they want or hope for sellers like this woman. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Families travel on the 14-hour train ride to Battambang. They ride both inside and outside of a dilapidated cargo car.

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.Families travel on the 14-hour train ride to Battambang. They ride both inside and outside of a dilapidated cargo car.

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: Families travel on the 14-hour train ride to Battambang. They ride both inside and outside of a dilapidated cargo car. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Families prepare for the 14-hour train ride to Battambang. They ride both inside and outside, on top of and between the dilapidated cargo cars.

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.Families prepare for the 14-hour train ride to Battambang. They ride both inside and outside, on top of and between the dilapidated cargo cars.

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: Families prepare for the 14-hour train ride to Battambang. They ride both inside and outside, on top of and between the dilapidated cargo cars. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Maintenance workers for the Cambodian railway system play cards in an abandoned car in the Phnom Penh rail yards. The system has no new rolling stock, no way of repairing the beat-up cars they do have, and no money to properly pay the workers, so they spend their days playing cards in the old cars.

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.Maintenance workers for the Cambodian railway system play cards in an abandoned car in the Phnom Penh rail yards. The system has no new rolling stock, no way of repairing the beat-up cars they do have, and no money to properly pay the workers, so they spend their days playing cards in the old cars.

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: Maintenance workers for the Cambodian railway system play cards in an abandoned car in the Phnom Penh rail yards. The system has no new rolling stock, no way of repairing the beat-up cars they do have, and no money to properly pay the workers, so they spend their days playing cards in the old cars. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • A boy peeks out from a passenger car making the 14-hour trip between Phnom Penh and Battambang. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.A boy peeks out from a passenger car making the 14-hour trip between Phnom Penh and Battambang. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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      Pochentong, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: A boy peeks out from a passenger car making the 14-hour trip between Phnom Penh and Battambang. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • A passenger rests with his belongings on the 14-hour train between Phnom Penh and Battambang. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.A passenger rests with his belongings on the 14-hour train between Phnom Penh and Battambang. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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    • jre03658.jpg
      Pochentong, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: A passenger rests with his belongings on the 14-hour train between Phnom Penh and Battambang. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • A young mother rocks her baby, hanging in a makeshift hammock strung up in a window on the 14-hour train ride between Phnom Penh and Battambang. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.A young mother rocks her baby, hanging in a makeshift hammock strung up in a window on the 14-hour train ride between Phnom Penh and Battambang. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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      Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: A young mother rocks her baby, hanging in a makeshift hammock strung up in a window on the 14-hour train ride between Phnom Penh and Battambang. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • The engineer waits for the conductor's signal to leave from Pochentong on the 14-hour train between Phnom Penh and Battambang. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.The engineer waits for the conductor's signal to leave from Pochentong on the 14-hour train between Phnom Penh and Battambang. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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      Pochentong, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: The engineer waits for the conductor's signal to leave from Pochentong on the 14-hour train between Phnom Penh and Battambang. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Hulks of decrepit train cars sit gathering dust in a railway barn in Phnom Penh. The Cambodian railway system has no new rolling stock, and almost no way of repairing the beat-up cars they do have.

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.Hulks of decrepit train cars sit gathering dust in a railway barn in Phnom Penh. The Cambodian railway system has no new rolling stock, and almost no way of repairing the beat-up cars they do have.

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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    • jre03680.jpg
      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: Hulks of decrepit train cars sit gathering dust in a railway barn in Phnom Penh. The Cambodian railway system has no new rolling stock, and almost no way of repairing the beat-up cars they do have. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • One of two new locomotives donated by the Chinese government sits unused in the rail yard in Phnom Penh. The tracks of the Cambodian rail system are in such poor shape that the new engines cannot run on them. So they sit in the barn. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.One of two new locomotives donated by the Chinese government sits unused in the rail yard in Phnom Penh. The tracks of the Cambodian rail system are in such poor shape that the new engines cannot run on them. So they sit in the barn. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: One of two new locomotives donated by the Chinese government sits unused in the rail yard in Phnom Penh. The tracks of the Cambodian rail system are in such poor shape that the new engines cannot run on them. So they sit in the barn. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • A man wakes up after sleeping through the afternoon in the train station in Phnom Penh. The station is one of the very few maintained buildings in the Cambodian railway system. It was originally built during the French colonial period. These days it only serves the irregular 14-hour service between Phnom Penh and Battambang, as all other passenger traffic has been halted.

 Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.A man wakes up after sleeping through the afternoon in the train station in Phnom Penh. The station is one of the very few maintained buildings in the Cambodian railway system. It was originally built during the French colonial period. These days it only serves the irregular 14-hour service between Phnom Penh and Battambang, as all other passenger traffic has been halted.

 Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • jre03669.jpg
      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: A man wakes up after sleeping through the afternoon in the train station in Phnom Penh. The station is one of the very few maintained buildings in the Cambodian railway system. It was originally built during the French colonial period. These days it only serves the irregular 14-hour service between Phnom Penh and Battambang, as all other passenger traffic has been halted. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Locals use the old fences of the Phnom Penh rail yard as fish drying racks and the abandoned cars just over the fence as toilets.

 Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

 The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. 

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.Locals use the old fences of the Phnom Penh rail yard as fish drying racks and the abandoned cars just over the fence as toilets.

 Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

 The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. 

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: Locals use the old fences of the Phnom Penh rail yard as fish drying racks and the abandoned cars just over the fence as toilets. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • A maintenance worker for the Cambodian railway system takes a break in the Phnom Penh rail yards. The system has no new rolling stock, no way of properly repairing the beat-up cars they do have, so mechanics make do with the tools they find: hammers and hand-made chisels.
Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.
The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.
As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.A maintenance worker for the Cambodian railway system takes a break in the Phnom Penh rail yards. The system has no new rolling stock, no way of properly repairing the beat-up cars they do have, so mechanics make do with the tools they find: hammers and hand-made chisels.
Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.
The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.
As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: A maintenance worker for the Cambodian railway system takes a break in the Phnom Penh rail yards. The system has no new rolling stock, no way of properly repairing the beat-up cars they do have, so mechanics make do with the tools they find: hammers and hand-made chisels. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • A view of squatter homes along the tracks running through Phnom Penh. Locals use the old fences as clothes lines and the abandoned cars just over the fence as toilets. 


Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

 The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.A view of squatter homes along the tracks running through Phnom Penh. Locals use the old fences as clothes lines and the abandoned cars just over the fence as toilets. 


Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

 The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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    • jre03681.jpg
      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: A view of squatter homes along the tracks running through Phnom Penh. Locals use the old fences as clothes lines and the abandoned cars just over the fence as toilets. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Fellow passengers help a man load bicycles onto a flatbed car making the 14-hour trip between Phnom Penh and Battambang. The car will be filled with cargo and people the whole way.

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.Fellow passengers help a man load bicycles onto a flatbed car making the 14-hour trip between Phnom Penh and Battambang. The car will be filled with cargo and people the whole way.

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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    • jre03655.jpg
      Pochentong, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: Fellow passengers help a man load bicycles onto a flatbed car making the 14-hour trip between Phnom Penh and Battambang. The car will be filled with cargo and people the whole way. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • The station master at Toal Leap surveys the track after the daily train from Phnom Penh to Battambang has passed. The old boxcar serves as his both his home and office.

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.The station master at Toal Leap surveys the track after the daily train from Phnom Penh to Battambang has passed. The old boxcar serves as his both his home and office.

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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    • jre03673.jpg
      Toal Leap, Kompong Speu, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: The station master at Toal Leap surveys the track after the daily train from Phnom Penh to Battambang has passed. The old boxcar serves as his both his home and office. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • A maintenance worker carries a set of wheels to be added to a repair car used to check the rails at Toal Leap. He goes out after the daily train from Phnom Penh to Battambang has passed. The wheels weigh well over 100 pounds.

 Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

 The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

 As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.A maintenance worker carries a set of wheels to be added to a repair car used to check the rails at Toal Leap. He goes out after the daily train from Phnom Penh to Battambang has passed. The wheels weigh well over 100 pounds.

 Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

 The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

 As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • jre03674.jpg
      Toal Leap, Kompong Speu, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: A maintenance worker carries a set of wheels to be added to a repair car used to check the rails at Toal Leap. He goes out after the daily train from Phnom Penh to Battambang has passed. The wheels weigh well over 100 pounds. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Portrait of a train conductor during a stop at a small town in  the countryside between Phnom Penh and Battambang. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.Portrait of a train conductor during a stop at a small town in  the countryside between Phnom Penh and Battambang. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
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    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • jre03672.jpg
      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: Portrait of a train conductor during a stop at a small town in the countryside between Phnom Penh and Battambang. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • A maintenance worker for the Cambodian railway system tightens a bogie on a locomotive in the Phnom Penh rail yards. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.A maintenance worker for the Cambodian railway system tightens a bogie on a locomotive in the Phnom Penh rail yards. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • jre03654.jpg
      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: A maintenance worker for the Cambodian railway system tightens a bogie on a locomotive in the Phnom Penh rail yards. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • View of an operating locomotive in the Phnom Penh rail yards. For years the trains were a target of Khmer Rouge attacks. The rail yards and barns in Phnom Penh are filled with smashed, rusting hulks from that period. Though the fighting stopped in 1998, locomotives still carry armor plating and many passenger and cargo cars still sport bullet and rocket holes.

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.View of an operating locomotive in the Phnom Penh rail yards. For years the trains were a target of Khmer Rouge attacks. The rail yards and barns in Phnom Penh are filled with smashed, rusting hulks from that period. Though the fighting stopped in 1998, locomotives still carry armor plating and many passenger and cargo cars still sport bullet and rocket holes.

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • jre03668.jpg
      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: View of an operating locomotive in the Phnom Penh rail yards. For years the trains were a target of Khmer Rouge attacks. The rail yards and barns in Phnom Penh are filled with smashed, rusting hulks from that period. Though the fighting stopped in 1998, locomotives still carry armor plating and many passenger and cargo cars still sport bullet and rocket holes. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Khim lost his sight and his right hand to a bomb during the civil war. Now, with the help of his dog, he sings for money from passengers on the trip between Phnom Penh and Battambang. 
The train provides the cheapest transportation in the country, and is often filled from the floorboards to the rooftop with many of the country's poorest people.Khim lost his sight and his right hand to a bomb during the civil war. Now, with the help of his dog, he sings for money from passengers on the trip between Phnom Penh and Battambang. 
The train provides the cheapest transportation in the country, and is often filled from the floorboards to the rooftop with many of the country's poorest people.
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    • jre00739.jpg
      Pursat, Cambodia - 01/08/2002: Khim lost his sight and his right hand to a bomb during the civil war. Now, with the help of his dog, he sings for money from passengers on the trip between Phnom Penh and Battambang. The train provides the cheapest transportation in the country, and is often filled from the floorboards to the rooftop with many of the country's poorest people.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Two Buddhist monks get a pair of intact benches to themselves on the 14-hour train ride through the countryside between Phnom Penh and Battambang. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.Two Buddhist monks get a pair of intact benches to themselves on the 14-hour train ride through the countryside between Phnom Penh and Battambang. 

Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport.

The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable.

As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
    • Add to lightbox
    • Contact the contributor about this file
    • View more from 'Travel'
    • jre03677.jpg
      Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 01/04/2005: Two Buddhist monks get a pair of intact benches to themselves on the 14-hour train ride through the countryside between Phnom Penh and Battambang. Cambodia's train system is the mode of transport for the poorest of the poor in a country defined by poverty - and yet the government has cut back passenger service for increased cargo transport. The rolling stock started off its Cambodian career as cast-offs from various European railroads. Now, it is at best dilapidated, at worst bullet-scarred and unusable. As foreign investment pours into the country after years of turmoil, almost none of it goes to refurbish this basic transport link.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern

 

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