Child Labor
Jerry Redfern
The vast majority of Cambodian children work, a labor imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy. Photographer Jerry Redfern’s photographs are not an essay on the horrors of child labor, but an attempt to portray its ubiquity in a culture that expects kids to work.

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  • Sy Ha, 13, sells balloons in front of the Royal Palace. He moved with his family to Phnom Penh 10 years earlier from Svay Rieng province. He makes 10,000 - 20,000 Riel a day (US $2.50 - $5), which he takes home for his family. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Sy Ha, 13, sells balloons in front of the Royal Palace. He moved with his family to Phnom Penh 10 years earlier from Svay Rieng province. He makes 10,000 - 20,000 Riel a day (US $2.50 - $5), which he takes home for his family. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 16/12/2005: Sy Ha, 13, sells balloons in front of the Royal Palace. He moved with his family to Phnom Penh 10 years earlier from Svay Rieng province. He makes 10,000 - 20,000 Riel a day (US $2.50 - $5), which he takes home for his family. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Wan Sao, 12, looks for collectables atop the Steung Meanchey dump on the edge of Phnom Penh. She has done this every day for the last two years since coming from Prey Veng Province with her father and sister. "I stopped going to school," she says. "I'm too busy working." She makes the equivalent of $0.50 a day. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Wan Sao, 12, looks for collectables atop the Steung Meanchey dump on the edge of Phnom Penh. She has done this every day for the last two years since coming from Prey Veng Province with her father and sister. "I stopped going to school," she says. "I'm too busy working." She makes the equivalent of $0.50 a day. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 09/04/2006: Wan Sao, 12, looks for collectables atop the Steung Meanchey dump on the edge of Phnom Penh. She has done this every day for the last two years since coming from Prey Veng Province with her father and sister. "I stopped going to school," she says. "I'm too busy working." She makes the equivalent of $0.50 a day. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Tok, 14, rakes salt crystals while working with his mother and young sister in a salt field. Their family came from Svay Rieng province for the seasonal work. They work barefoot all day in the sun raking and hauling the sharp crystals in hot water. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Tok, 14, rakes salt crystals while working with his mother and young sister in a salt field. Their family came from Svay Rieng province for the seasonal work. They work barefoot all day in the sun raking and hauling the sharp crystals in hot water. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Kampot, Kampot, Cambodia - 04/04/2006: Tok, 14, rakes salt crystals while working with his mother and young sister in a salt field. Their family came from Svay Rieng province for the seasonal work. They work barefoot all day in the sun raking and hauling the sharp crystals in hot water. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Puong Vanna, 10, has sold souvenirs near Angkor Wat for the last two months. Before that she worked at home making bracelets from bamboo. She goes to school in the mornings and works every day, making 10,000 Riel. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Puong Vanna, 10, has sold souvenirs near Angkor Wat for the last two months. Before that she worked at home making bracelets from bamboo. She goes to school in the mornings and works every day, making 10,000 Riel. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Siem Reap, Cambodia - 29/11/2006: Puong Vanna, 10, has sold souvenirs near Angkor Wat for the last two months. Before that she worked at home making bracelets from bamboo. She goes to school in the mornings and works every day, making 10,000 Riel. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Mau, 15, has fished every day for his family for the last three or four years, he cannot remember exactly how long. He goes to school in the afternoons. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Mau, 15, has fished every day for his family for the last three or four years, he cannot remember exactly how long. He goes to school in the afternoons. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Siem Reap, Siem Reap, Cambodia - 28/11/2006: Mau, 15, has fished every day for his family for the last three or four years, he cannot remember exactly how long. He goes to school in the afternoons. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Phan Champa, whose mother says she is seven, fills bike and moto tires will air in front of her family’s house. She is also in charge of caring for her two younger sisters and brother. She has worked at the little stand for the last two years. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Phan Champa, whose mother says she is seven, fills bike and moto tires will air in front of her family’s house. She is also in charge of caring for her two younger sisters and brother. She has worked at the little stand for the last two years. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Prei Thom, Siem Reap, Cambodia - 28/11/2006: Phan Champa, whose mother says she is seven, fills bike and moto tires will air in front of her family’s house. She is also in charge of caring for her two younger sisters and brother. She has worked at the little stand for the last two years. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Srei Nhut, 8, watches a cow for her family. At home she has a brother, 21, and two sisters, 16 and 18. She is in charge of the family's four cows. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Srei Nhut, 8, watches a cow for her family. At home she has a brother, 21, and two sisters, 16 and 18. She is in charge of the family's four cows. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Kampot, Cambodia - 30/08/2006: Srei Nhut, 8, watches a cow for her family. At home she has a brother, 21, and two sisters, 16 and 18. She is in charge of the family's four cows. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Manjeem Put, 15, is an orphan. She came from Svay Rieng Province with an aunt three months before to look for work. She now makes 5,000 - 6,000 Riel (US $1.25 - $1.50) a day at a construction site. She used to go to school but, "I don't want to go anymore. I don't have enough money for food." The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Manjeem Put, 15, is an orphan. She came from Svay Rieng Province with an aunt three months before to look for work. She now makes 5,000 - 6,000 Riel (US $1.25 - $1.50) a day at a construction site. She used to go to school but, "I don't want to go anymore. I don't have enough money for food." The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 08/04/2006: Manjeem Put, 15, is an orphan. She came from Svay Rieng Province with an aunt three months before to look for work. She now makes 5,000 - 6,000 Riel (US $1.25 - $1.50) a day at a construction site. She used to go to school but, "I don't want to go anymore. I don't have enough money for food." The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Ieng, 13, moved with her family from Svay Rieng province one year ago to work in this brick factory. She works eight hours a day and the $30 a month she makes goes to her parents. She does not go to school. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Ieng, 13, moved with her family from Svay Rieng province one year ago to work in this brick factory. She works eight hours a day and the $30 a month she makes goes to her parents. She does not go to school. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Siem Reap, Cambodia - 29/11/2006: Ieng, 13, moved with her family from Svay Rieng province one year ago to work in this brick factory. She works eight hours a day and the $30 a month she makes goes to her parents. She does not go to school. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Khon, 12, helps his father, Khoen, carry the motor from their fishing boat to their home. The two go fishing every day, both for their family to eat and for selling at the market. Khon says he goes to school when it is open. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Khon, 12, helps his father, Khoen, carry the motor from their fishing boat to their home. The two go fishing every day, both for their family to eat and for selling at the market. Khon says he goes to school when it is open. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Kandal, Cambodia - 24/08/2006: Khon, 12, helps his father, Khoen, carry the motor from their fishing boat to their home. The two go fishing every day, both for their family to eat and for selling at the market. Khon says he goes to school when it is open. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Sol Moum, 12, has been in charge of her family's laundry for the last few years. She washes it in the Mekong river, a few hundred meters from her home. She is also responsible for her younger brother Sol Pii (hiding behind her). Sol Moum goes to school when it is open, and also cooks and cleans the house for her family. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Sol Moum, 12, has been in charge of her family's laundry for the last few years. She washes it in the Mekong river, a few hundred meters from her home. She is also responsible for her younger brother Sol Pii (hiding behind her). Sol Moum goes to school when it is open, and also cooks and cleans the house for her family. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Kandal, Cambodia - 24/08/2006: Sol Moum, 12, has been in charge of her family's laundry for the last few years. She washes it in the Mekong river, a few hundred meters from her home. She is also responsible for her younger brother Sol Pii (hiding behind her). Sol Moum goes to school when it is open, and also cooks and cleans the house for her family. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Ream, 10, looks for a frog in a modified digging pipe. He and his twin brother Preak were catching frogs to supplement their family's dinner. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Ream, 10, looks for a frog in a modified digging pipe. He and his twin brother Preak were catching frogs to supplement their family's dinner. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Prek Leap, Kompong Speu, Cambodia - 08/04/2006: Ream, 10, looks for a frog in a modified digging pipe. He and his twin brother Preak were catching frogs to supplement their family's dinner. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Pri Kaeo, 13, has worked every day for the last seven years picking jasmine blossoms, which are sold to flower vendors in Phnom Penh. She has two sisters who work with her. Pri Kaeo is in the 6th grade, and prefers school to picking flowers. All of the money she and her sisters earn goes to her family. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Pri Kaeo, 13, has worked every day for the last seven years picking jasmine blossoms, which are sold to flower vendors in Phnom Penh. She has two sisters who work with her. Pri Kaeo is in the 6th grade, and prefers school to picking flowers. All of the money she and her sisters earn goes to her family. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Thmei Village, Kandal, Cambodia - 25/08/2006: Pri Kaeo, 13, has worked every day for the last seven years picking jasmine blossoms, which are sold to flower vendors in Phnom Penh. She has two sisters who work with her. Pri Kaeo is in the 6th grade, and prefers school to picking flowers. All of the money she and her sisters earn goes to her family. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Muot, 14, collects plastic from rubbish bins behind new businesses in Siem Reap. He has been collecting plastic every day last year and can make about 1,500 Riel a day, money for his family. He goes to school every morning, which is a one hour walk from his home. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Muot, 14, collects plastic from rubbish bins behind new businesses in Siem Reap. He has been collecting plastic every day last year and can make about 1,500 Riel a day, money for his family. He goes to school every morning, which is a one hour walk from his home. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Siem Reap, Siem Reap, Cambodia - 27/11/2006: Muot, 14, collects plastic from rubbish bins behind new businesses in Siem Reap. He has been collecting plastic every day last year and can make about 1,500 Riel a day, money for his family. He goes to school every morning, which is a one hour walk from his home. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Ly Ka came from Kompong Cham three or four years ago and began working for her aunt collecting plastic from garbage piles and caring for her nephew. She goes to school in the mornings. She does not know how old she is. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Ly Ka came from Kompong Cham three or four years ago and began working for her aunt collecting plastic from garbage piles and caring for her nephew. She goes to school in the mornings. She does not know how old she is. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Siem Reap, Siem Reap, Cambodia - 28/11/2006: Ly Ka came from Kompong Cham three or four years ago and began working for her aunt collecting plastic from garbage piles and caring for her nephew. She goes to school in the mornings. She does not know how old she is. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Mahp, 11, sells drinks from a cooler along the river front promenade in the evening in Phnom Penh. She lives with her family, attends school during the day and works every night. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Mahp, 11, sells drinks from a cooler along the river front promenade in the evening in Phnom Penh. She lives with her family, attends school during the day and works every night. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 08/04/2006: Mahp, 11, sells drinks from a cooler along the river front promenade in the evening in Phnom Penh. She lives with her family, attends school during the day and works every night. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Hong, 10, sells his own paintings to tourists on the beach for $2-$3 each when he's not in school. He gives the money to an aunt with whom he lives. His parents died several years ago, his mother from illness, his father shot in Phnom Penh. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Hong, 10, sells his own paintings to tourists on the beach for $2-$3 each when he's not in school. He gives the money to an aunt with whom he lives. His parents died several years ago, his mother from illness, his father shot in Phnom Penh. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Sihanoukville, Kompong Som, Cambodia - 29/03/2006: Hong, 10, sells his own paintings to tourists on the beach for $2-$3 each when he's not in school. He gives the money to an aunt with whom he lives. His parents died several years ago, his mother from illness, his father shot in Phnom Penh. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Say Sen, 13, and her 6-month-old brother Song Ly, beg for money along the river front in Phnom Penh. She lives with her parents in the Tonle Bassac squatter camp, and says she also goes to school every day. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Say Sen, 13, and her 6-month-old brother Song Ly, beg for money along the river front in Phnom Penh. She lives with her parents in the Tonle Bassac squatter camp, and says she also goes to school every day. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia - 27/11/2005: Say Sen, 13, and her 6-month-old brother Song Ly, beg for money along the river front in Phnom Penh. She lives with her parents in the Tonle Bassac squatter camp, and says she also goes to school every day. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Sovann Mekada, who thinks he is either seven or nine, goes to school every morning and collects wood for his family in Angkor Thom every afternoon. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Sovann Mekada, who thinks he is either seven or nine, goes to school every morning and collects wood for his family in Angkor Thom every afternoon. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Siem Reap, Cambodia - 29/11/2006: Sovann Mekada, who thinks he is either seven or nine, goes to school every morning and collects wood for his family in Angkor Thom every afternoon. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Sarieung, 14, and his sister, Sok Lai, 12, collect plastic from among the garbage piles in the streets of Siem Reap after dark. They say they go to school during the days. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Sarieung, 14, and his sister, Sok Lai, 12, collect plastic from among the garbage piles in the streets of Siem Reap after dark. They say they go to school during the days. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Siem Reap, Siem Reap, Cambodia - 24/11/2005: Sarieung, 14, and his sister, Sok Lai, 12, collect plastic from among the garbage piles in the streets of Siem Reap after dark. They say they go to school during the days. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern
  • Tour, 12, sells bracelets to tourists along the beach. He says he began selling them two or three years ago, about the same time that his father died. He gives the money he makes to his mother, who pays the $2.50 a month for him to go to school. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.Tour, 12, sells bracelets to tourists along the beach. He says he began selling them two or three years ago, about the same time that his father died. He gives the money he makes to his mother, who pays the $2.50 a month for him to go to school. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
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      Sihanoukville, Kompong Som, Cambodia - 29/03/2006: Tour, 12, sells bracelets to tourists along the beach. He says he began selling them two or three years ago, about the same time that his father died. He gives the money he makes to his mother, who pays the $2.50 a month for him to go to school. The vast majority of Cambodian children work. Their labor is imperative for their survival and the survival of their families. In rural areas, kids are expected to work beside their parents on farms. In cities, they are sent out to sell flowers, drinks or shine shoes for extra money. Everywhere, as soon as they are able, children are expected to take care of their younger siblings and take up difficult family chores, work that is usually reserved for parents or servants in the developed world. In Cambodia, kids work everywhere, and form a significant, underreported part of the country's economy.
      Credit: Jerry Redfern

 

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