Environmental Issues
By LightRocket Photographers
Global warming, air pollution, water pollution, droughts, floods, over-population, slash and burn, logging, GMOs the earth is in trouble.

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  • Mali, Near Timbuktu, Tuareg Camp In Harmattan Dust Storm, Edge Of Sahara.Mali, Near Timbuktu, Tuareg Camp In Harmattan Dust Storm, Edge Of Sahara.
  • Burned forest in plantations around Riau, owned by the two giant pulp and paper producers, Asia Pacific Resources International Holdings Ltd. (APRIL) and Asia Pulp and Paper (APP). Plantations of the popular species for pulp, Acacia Mangium, are susceptible to forest fires. But the government has stipulated that it is now a crime to clear land by burning.Burned forest in plantations around Riau, owned by the two giant pulp and paper producers, Asia Pacific Resources International Holdings Ltd. (APRIL) and Asia Pulp and Paper (APP). Plantations of the popular species for pulp, Acacia Mangium, are susceptible to forest fires. But the government has stipulated that it is now a crime to clear land by burning.
  • Greenpeace China activist Zhong Ju shows a 1968 photo of the Middle Rongbuk Glacier to illustrate a 2km retreat and deterioration of the glacier in just under 40 years. A Greenpeace team based in Beijing investigated the retreat of the Middle Rongbuk Glacier, Mount Everest (Qomolangma). The Rongbuk Glaciers are one of the prime sources of water feeding into the major rivers of China and India. Glaciers in the Himalaya are receding faster than in any other part of the world as a result of global warming. It is estimated by scientists that if the present rate of climate change continues then there is a strong likelihood that most of the Himalayan glaciers would disappear completely by 2035.Greenpeace China activist Zhong Ju shows a 1968 photo of the Middle Rongbuk Glacier to illustrate a 2km retreat and deterioration of the glacier in just under 40 years. A Greenpeace team based in Beijing investigated the retreat of the Middle Rongbuk Glacier, Mount Everest (Qomolangma). The Rongbuk Glaciers are one of the prime sources of water feeding into the major rivers of China and India. Glaciers in the Himalaya are receding faster than in any other part of the world as a result of global warming. It is estimated by scientists that if the present rate of climate change continues then there is a strong likelihood that most of the Himalayan glaciers would disappear completely by 2035.
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      Tibet, China - 21/04/2007: Greenpeace China activist Zhong Ju shows a 1968 photo of the Middle Rongbuk Glacier to illustrate a 2km retreat and deterioration of the glacier in just under 40 years. A Greenpeace team based in Beijing investigated the retreat of the Middle Rongbuk Glacier, Mount Everest (Qomolangma). The Rongbuk Glaciers are one of the prime sources of water feeding into the major rivers of China and India. Glaciers in the Himalaya are receding faster than in any other part of the world as a result of global warming. It is estimated by scientists that if the present rate of climate change continues then there is a strong likelihood that most of the Himalayan glaciers would disappear completely by 2035.
      Credit: John Novis
  • A young boy swimming in extremely polluted river water. The indiscriminate discharge of liquid waste by industries and factories in and around the Dhaka industrial zone has ruined a large part of the Buriganga river, causing immense suffering to residents living on the banks.A young boy swimming in extremely polluted river water. The indiscriminate discharge of liquid waste by industries and factories in and around the Dhaka industrial zone has ruined a large part of the Buriganga river, causing immense suffering to residents living on the banks.
  • Amazon rainforest clearance. Deforestation. Acre State near Rio Branco city, Brazil.Amazon rainforest clearance. Deforestation. Acre State near Rio Branco city, Brazil.
  • Farmers working with a tiller and a shovel in a rice paddy, with pollution-spewing factories looming in the background.Farmers working with a tiller and a shovel in a rice paddy, with pollution-spewing factories looming in the background.
  • Seemingly chaotic traffic on Fulbaria Road shows some organization as cars, rickshaws and pedestrians follow their own lanes.Seemingly chaotic traffic on Fulbaria Road shows some organization as cars, rickshaws and pedestrians follow their own lanes.
  • Murad (age 15), a worker in a black iron oxide manual factory.  Every day he works for 10 – 12 hours and gets Taka 1500 (approx US$21) per month. After his father died he stopped going to school and got work at the factory to support his family. The manufacture of black iron oxide is considered to be one of the most hazardous occupations in Bangladesh. Workers work in extreme conditions without any safety measures such as safety goggles, face masks, gloves, work boots and so on.Murad (age 15), a worker in a black iron oxide manual factory.  Every day he works for 10 – 12 hours and gets Taka 1500 (approx US$21) per month. After his father died he stopped going to school and got work at the factory to support his family. The manufacture of black iron oxide is considered to be one of the most hazardous occupations in Bangladesh. Workers work in extreme conditions without any safety measures such as safety goggles, face masks, gloves, work boots and so on.
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    • View more... Faces in Black Oxide Industrial Pollution in Bangladesh
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      Gazipur, Dhaka, Dhaka, Gazipur, Bangladesh - 25/06/2010: Murad (age 15), a worker in a black iron oxide manual factory. Every day he works for 10 – 12 hours and gets Taka 1500 (approx US$21) per month. After his father died he stopped going to school and got work at the factory to support his family. The manufacture of black iron oxide is considered to be one of the most hazardous occupations in Bangladesh. Workers work in extreme conditions without any safety measures such as safety goggles, face masks, gloves, work boots and so on.
      Credit: Probal Rashid
  • Delegates at the UN Climate Change Conference in Montreal, Canada, today got a first hand view of carbon dioxide emissions coming from Thailand's Mae Moh coal power plant, the largest and most notorious of its kind in Southeast Asia. Greenpeace activists transmitted to the conference live images of the coal plant as a laser projector beamed messages such as "CLIMATE CHANGE STARTS HERE" and "COAL KILLS" in front of the Mae Moh coal power plant.

Delegates at the UN Climate Change Conference in Montreal, Canada, today got a first hand view of carbon dioxide emissions coming from Thailand's Mae Moh coal power plant, the largest and most notorious of its kind in Southeast Asia. Greenpeace activists transmitted to the conference live images of the coal plant as a laser projector beamed messages such as "CLIMATE CHANGE STARTS HERE" and "COAL KILLS" in front of the Mae Moh coal power plant.
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      Lampang, Thailand - 30/11/2005: Delegates at the UN Climate Change Conference in Montreal, Canada, today got a first hand view of carbon dioxide emissions coming from Thailand's Mae Moh coal power plant, the largest and most notorious of its kind in Southeast Asia. Greenpeace activists transmitted to the conference live images of the coal plant as a laser projector beamed messages such as "CLIMATE CHANGE STARTS HERE" and "COAL KILLS" in front of the Mae Moh coal power plant.
      Credit: Vinai Ditthajohn
  • Overfishing, Tuna, Illegal, IUU, Fishing, Human Rights, Labour Rights, Labor Rights, Purse Seiner, Purse Seine Fishing, Nets, Net, Frozen, Yellowfin, Bigeye, Skipjack, Juvenile, Schools of fish, Transhipment, Greenpeace, Philippines, Pa-aling, Compressor Diving, Compressor, Compressor Diver, Foot, Hose, IMO, Underwater, Award-winning, Aerial, Fishing boat, boat, Hold, Dangerous occupations, bycatchOverfishing, Tuna, Illegal, IUU, Fishing, Human Rights, Labour Rights, Labor Rights, Purse Seiner, Purse Seine Fishing, Nets, Net, Frozen, Yellowfin, Bigeye, Skipjack, Juvenile, Schools of fish, Transhipment, Greenpeace, Philippines, Pa-aling, Compressor Diving, Compressor, Compressor Diver, Foot, Hose, IMO, Underwater, Award-winning, Aerial, Fishing boat, boat, Hold, Dangerous occupations, bycatch
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    • View more... Human Rights & Overfishing Underwater
    • PhilippinesCompressorDivingRT-09.jpg
      12/11/2012: Overfishing, Tuna, Illegal, IUU, Fishing, Human Rights, Labour Rights, Labor Rights, Purse Seiner, Purse Seine Fishing, Nets, Net, Frozen, Yellowfin, Bigeye, Skipjack, Juvenile, Schools of fish, Transhipment, Greenpeace, Philippines, Pa-aling, Compressor Diving, Compressor, Compressor Diver, Foot, Hose, IMO, Underwater, Award-winning, Aerial, Fishing boat, boat, Hold, Dangerous occupations, bycatch
      Credit: ALEX HOFFORD /GREENPEACE
  • Thai activists sealed off the GE papaya at the agricultural research station of the Department of Agriculture. Dressed in protective suits they removed the GE papaya fruit from the trees then secured them in hazardous material containers. They also demanded that the government complete this process and immediately destroy all papaya trees, fruit, seedlings, and seeds in the Khon Kaen research station to prevent further contamination.Thai activists sealed off the GE papaya at the agricultural research station of the Department of Agriculture. Dressed in protective suits they removed the GE papaya fruit from the trees then secured them in hazardous material containers. They also demanded that the government complete this process and immediately destroy all papaya trees, fruit, seedlings, and seeds in the Khon Kaen research station to prevent further contamination.
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      Khon Kaen, Thailand - 27/07/2004: Thai activists sealed off the GE papaya at the agricultural research station of the Department of Agriculture. Dressed in protective suits they removed the GE papaya fruit from the trees then secured them in hazardous material containers. They also demanded that the government complete this process and immediately destroy all papaya trees, fruit, seedlings, and seeds in the Khon Kaen research station to prevent further contamination.
      Credit: Yvan Cohen
  • Landscape of ice and mountains.Landscape of ice and mountains.
  • A young boy is playing on the pieces of processed leather at Hazaribagh. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry.A young boy is playing on the pieces of processed leather at Hazaribagh. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry.
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      Hazaribagh, Dhaka, Bangladesh - 13/11/2012: A young boy is playing on the pieces of processed leather at Hazaribagh. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry.
      Credit: Probal Rashid
  • Women sorting coal which is used in the kilns at a brick field. Huge numbers of women and children work in the brick fields of Dhaka. These women and children come to Dhaka with their family in search of food. They are forced to work in hazardous condition in the fields. Industries and motorized vehicles are the two major sources of urban air pollution in Bangladesh.Women sorting coal which is used in the kilns at a brick field. Huge numbers of women and children work in the brick fields of Dhaka. These women and children come to Dhaka with their family in search of food. They are forced to work in hazardous condition in the fields. Industries and motorized vehicles are the two major sources of urban air pollution in Bangladesh.
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      Gazipur, Dhaka, Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh - 22/02/2008: Women sorting coal which is used in the kilns at a brick field. Huge numbers of women and children work in the brick fields of Dhaka. These women and children come to Dhaka with their family in search of food. They are forced to work in hazardous condition in the fields. Industries and motorized vehicles are the two major sources of urban air pollution in Bangladesh.
      Credit: Probal Rashid
  • Late evening looking over Mount Isa as smoke billows from a stack from one of the mines in this small outback town.  Coal and iron ore are mined and smelted here and pollution just pours out into the desert atmosphere.Late evening looking over Mount Isa as smoke billows from a stack from one of the mines in this small outback town.  Coal and iron ore are mined and smelted here and pollution just pours out into the desert atmosphere.
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      Mount Isa, QUEENSLAND, Australia - 01/05/1988: Late evening looking over Mount Isa as smoke billows from a stack from one of the mines in this small outback town. Coal and iron ore are mined and smelted here and pollution just pours out into the desert atmosphere.
      Credit: Peter Charlesworth
  • Landscape of ice and mountains.Landscape of ice and mountains.
  • EARTH Antarctica -- 2009 -- For a long time, it seemed that Antarctica was immune to global warming. Most of the icy southern continent, where temperatures can plummet to minus 80 degrees Celsius (-112 degrees Fahrenheit), seemed to be holding steady or even cooling as the rest of the planet warmed. But a new analysis of satellite and weather station data has shown that Antarctica has warmed at a rate of about 0.12 degrees Celsius (0.22 degrees F) per decade since 1957, for a total average temperature rise of 0.5 degrees Celsius (1 degree F). This image, based on the analysis of weather station and satellite data, shows the continent-wide warming trend from 1957 through 2006. Dark red over West Antarctica reflects that the region warmed most per decade. Most of the rest of the continent is orange, indicating a smaller warming trend, or white, where no change was observed. The underlying land surface color is based on the Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA) data set, while the topography is from a Radarsat-based digital elevation model. Sea ice extent in the Southern Ocean surrounding the continent is based on data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) collected on May 14, 2008 (late fall in the Southern Hemisphere) -- Picture by Lightroom Photos / NASA..The image paints a different picture of temperature trends in Antarctica than scientists had previously observed. Limited weather station measurements had recorded a dramatic warming trend along the peninsula, which juts into warmer waters in the Southern Ocean, but the few stations that dotted the rest of the continent reported that temperatures there had not changed or had cooled. It has been difficult to get a clear picture of temperature trends throughout Antarctica because measurements are so scarce. Few weather stations exist, and most of these are near the coast where they are relatively accessible. These coastal locations left vast regions of the continent's interior where theEARTH Antarctica -- 2009 -- For a long time, it seemed that Antarctica was immune to global warming. Most of the icy southern continent, where temperatures can plummet to minus 80 degrees Celsius (-112 degrees Fahrenheit), seemed to be holding steady or even cooling as the rest of the planet warmed. But a new analysis of satellite and weather station data has shown that Antarctica has warmed at a rate of about 0.12 degrees Celsius (0.22 degrees F) per decade since 1957, for a total average temperature rise of 0.5 degrees Celsius (1 degree F). This image, based on the analysis of weather station and satellite data, shows the continent-wide warming trend from 1957 through 2006. Dark red over West Antarctica reflects that the region warmed most per decade. Most of the rest of the continent is orange, indicating a smaller warming trend, or white, where no change was observed. The underlying land surface color is based on the Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA) data set, while the topography is from a Radarsat-based digital elevation model. Sea ice extent in the Southern Ocean surrounding the continent is based on data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) collected on May 14, 2008 (late fall in the Southern Hemisphere) -- Picture by Lightroom Photos / NASA..The image paints a different picture of temperature trends in Antarctica than scientists had previously observed. Limited weather station measurements had recorded a dramatic warming trend along the peninsula, which juts into warmer waters in the Southern Ocean, but the few stations that dotted the rest of the continent reported that temperatures there had not changed or had cooled. It has been difficult to get a clear picture of temperature trends throughout Antarctica because measurements are so scarce. Few weather stations exist, and most of these are near the coast where they are relatively accessible. These coastal locations left vast regions of the continent's interior where the
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      27/09/2009: EARTH Antarctica -- 2009 -- For a long time, it seemed that Antarctica was immune to global warming. Most of the icy southern continent, where temperatures can plummet to minus 80 degrees Celsius (-112 degrees Fahrenheit), seemed to be holding steady or even cooling as the rest of the planet warmed. But a new analysis of satellite and weather station data has shown that Antarctica has warmed at a rate of about 0.12 degrees Celsius (0.22 degrees F) per decade since 1957, for a total average temperature rise of 0.5 degrees Celsius (1 degree F). This image, based on the analysis of weather station and satellite data, shows the continent-wide warming trend from 1957 through 2006. Dark red over West Antarctica reflects that the region warmed most per decade. Most of the rest of the continent is orange, indicating a smaller warming trend, or white, where no change was observed. The underlying land surface color is based on the Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA) data set, while the topography is from a Radarsat-based digital elevation model. Sea ice extent in the Southern Ocean surrounding the continent is based on data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) collected on May 14, 2008 (late fall in the Southern Hemisphere) -- Picture by Lightroom Photos / NASA..The image paints a different picture of temperature trends in Antarctica than scientists had previously observed. Limited weather station measurements had recorded a dramatic warming trend along the peninsula, which juts into warmer waters in the Southern Ocean, but the few stations that dotted the rest of the continent reported that temperatures there had not changed or had cooled. It has been difficult to get a clear picture of temperature trends throughout Antarctica because measurements are so scarce. Few weather stations exist, and most of these are near the coast where they are relatively accessible. These coastal locations left vast regions of the continent's interior where the
      Credit: Lightroom Photos / TopFoto
  • A man and his son selling anti-haze masks to motorists.A man and his son selling anti-haze masks to motorists.
  • Burned forest in plantations around Riau, owned by the two giant pulp and paper producers, Asia Pacific Resources International Holdings Ltd. (APRIL) and Asia Pulp and Paper (APP). Plantations of the popular species for pulp, Acacia Mangium, are susceptible to forest fires. But the government has stipulated that it is now a crime to clear land by burning.Burned forest in plantations around Riau, owned by the two giant pulp and paper producers, Asia Pacific Resources International Holdings Ltd. (APRIL) and Asia Pulp and Paper (APP). Plantations of the popular species for pulp, Acacia Mangium, are susceptible to forest fires. But the government has stipulated that it is now a crime to clear land by burning.
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      PEKANBARU, Sumatra, Indonesia - 25/08/2006: Burned forest in plantations around Riau, owned by the two giant pulp and paper producers, Asia Pacific Resources International Holdings Ltd. (APRIL) and Asia Pulp and Paper (APP). Plantations of the popular species for pulp, Acacia Mangium, are susceptible to forest fires. But the government has stipulated that it is now a crime to clear land by burning.
      Credit: Vinai Ditthajohn
  • EARTH North Atlantic Ocean -- 10 Feb 2014 -- Hurricane storm hits the UK on 'Wild Wednesday'...This composite satellite image of data from the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites shows the British Isles swathed in cloud while being hit by a hurricane-like storm today which is battering the west coast of Britain and bringing winds of over 100mph causing widespread problems nationwide -- Picture by Atlas Photo Archive/NASAEARTH North Atlantic Ocean -- 10 Feb 2014 -- Hurricane storm hits the UK on 'Wild Wednesday'...This composite satellite image of data from the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites shows the British Isles swathed in cloud while being hit by a hurricane-like storm today which is battering the west coast of Britain and bringing winds of over 100mph causing widespread problems nationwide -- Picture by Atlas Photo Archive/NASA
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      EARTH North Atlantic Ocean -- 10 Feb 2014 -- Hurricane storm hits the UK on 'Wild Wednesday'...This composite satellite image of data from the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites shows the British Isles swathed in cloud while being hit by a hurricane-like storm today which is battering the west coast of Britain and bringing winds of over 100mph causing widespread problems nationwide -- Picture by Atlas Photo Archive/NASA
      Credit: Atlas Photo Archive/NASA
  • USA New Orleans -- 03 Sep 2005 -- A US Army (USA) National Guard (NG) aircrew member of the "Cajun Dustoffs" looks out of a USA UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter at the flooded streets of New Orleans, Louisiana (LA). They preparing to land near the Superdome during Hurricane Katrina humanitarian assistance operations in a joint effort led by the Department of Defense (DoD) in conjunction with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) -- Picture by Brien Aho | Lightroom Photos | US NavyUSA New Orleans -- 03 Sep 2005 -- A US Army (USA) National Guard (NG) aircrew member of the "Cajun Dustoffs" looks out of a USA UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter at the flooded streets of New Orleans, Louisiana (LA). They preparing to land near the Superdome during Hurricane Katrina humanitarian assistance operations in a joint effort led by the Department of Defense (DoD) in conjunction with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) -- Picture by Brien Aho | Lightroom Photos | US Navy
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      NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA (LA), United States - 03/09/2005: USA New Orleans -- 03 Sep 2005 -- A US Army (USA) National Guard (NG) aircrew member of the "Cajun Dustoffs" looks out of a USA UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter at the flooded streets of New Orleans, Louisiana (LA). They preparing to land near the Superdome during Hurricane Katrina humanitarian assistance operations in a joint effort led by the Department of Defense (DoD) in conjunction with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) -- Picture by Brien Aho | Lightroom Photos | US Navy
      Credit: Lightroom Photos / TopFoto
  • Children collecting water from a well.Children collecting water from a well.
  • Greenpeace ship "Artic Sunrise"  at Amazonas river ( Amazon river ). Santarem, Para State, Brasil.Greenpeace ship "Artic Sunrise"  at Amazonas river ( Amazon river ). Santarem, Para State, Brasil.
  • Mali, Djenne, Street Scene Girl Getting Water From Well.Mali, Djenne, Street Scene Girl Getting Water From Well.
  • Smoke billows from a stack in the town of  Mount Isa, Austrailia.Smoke billows from a stack in the town of  Mount Isa, Austrailia.
  • Children swim in polluted river water. Factories are discharging untreated chemicals into the tributaries of the river Turag, which are destroying fish and other aquatic life and also causing immense suffering to residents living on the river's banks.Children swim in polluted river water. Factories are discharging untreated chemicals into the tributaries of the river Turag, which are destroying fish and other aquatic life and also causing immense suffering to residents living on the river's banks.
  • USA Gulf of Mexico -- 21 Apr 2010 -- Fire boat response crews battle the blazing remnants of the oil rig Deepwater Horizon off the Louisiana coast in the Gulf of Mexico, USA. A Coast Guard MH-65C dolphin rescue helicopter and crew document the fire aboard the mobile drilling unit Deepwater Horizon, while searching for survivors. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizon's 126 person crew -- Picture by Atlas Photo Archive / USCGUSA Gulf of Mexico -- 21 Apr 2010 -- Fire boat response crews battle the blazing remnants of the oil rig Deepwater Horizon off the Louisiana coast in the Gulf of Mexico, USA. A Coast Guard MH-65C dolphin rescue helicopter and crew document the fire aboard the mobile drilling unit Deepwater Horizon, while searching for survivors. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizon's 126 person crew -- Picture by Atlas Photo Archive / USCG
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      21/04/2010 08:20:15: USA Gulf of Mexico -- 21 Apr 2010 -- Fire boat response crews battle the blazing remnants of the oil rig Deepwater Horizon off the Louisiana coast in the Gulf of Mexico, USA. A Coast Guard MH-65C dolphin rescue helicopter and crew document the fire aboard the mobile drilling unit Deepwater Horizon, while searching for survivors. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizon's 126 person crew -- Picture by Atlas Photo Archive / USCG
      Credit: Atlas Photo Archive / USCG
  • SPAIN Carnota -- 01/01/2003 -- Volunteers clean oil from rocks on the beach at Carnota. Thousands of tonnes of heavy fuel oil which has leaked from the sunken tanker Prestige, have affected over 1,500 km of coast stretching from Portugal through Spain to France -- Picture © Miguel Riopa / Lightroom PhotosSPAIN Carnota -- 01/01/2003 -- Volunteers clean oil from rocks on the beach at Carnota. Thousands of tonnes of heavy fuel oil which has leaked from the sunken tanker Prestige, have affected over 1,500 km of coast stretching from Portugal through Spain to France -- Picture © Miguel Riopa / Lightroom Photos
  • SPAIN Malpica -- Dec 2002 -- Cormorant sea bird affected by the oil on the beach at Malpica Galicia Spain. Thousands of tonnes of heavy fuel oil which has leaked from the sunken tanker Prestige, have affected over 1,500 km of coast stretching from Portugal through Spain to France -- Picture © Miguel Riopa / Atlas Photo ArchiveSPAIN Malpica -- Dec 2002 -- Cormorant sea bird affected by the oil on the beach at Malpica Galicia Spain. Thousands of tonnes of heavy fuel oil which has leaked from the sunken tanker Prestige, have affected over 1,500 km of coast stretching from Portugal through Spain to France -- Picture © Miguel Riopa / Atlas Photo Archive
  • SPAIN Carnota -- 14/12/2002 -- Soldiers clean heavy fuel oil from rocks in Carnota. Thousands of tonnes of heavy fuel oil which has leaked from the sunken tanker Prestige, have affected over 1,500 km of coast stretching from Portugal through Spain to France -- Picture © Miguel Riopa / Lightroom PhotosSPAIN Carnota -- 14/12/2002 -- Soldiers clean heavy fuel oil from rocks in Carnota. Thousands of tonnes of heavy fuel oil which has leaked from the sunken tanker Prestige, have affected over 1,500 km of coast stretching from Portugal through Spain to France -- Picture © Miguel Riopa / Lightroom Photos
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      30/01/2003: SPAIN Carnota -- 14/12/2002 -- Soldiers clean heavy fuel oil from rocks in Carnota. Thousands of tonnes of heavy fuel oil which has leaked from the sunken tanker Prestige, have affected over 1,500 km of coast stretching from Portugal through Spain to France -- Picture © Miguel Riopa / Lightroom Photos
      Credit: / TopFoto
  • USA Nantucket -- 21 Dec 1976 -- The two halves of the SS Argo Merchant swirl in a sea of foam before being sucked under. The tanker broke into two pieces Dec. 21, 1976, after running aground six days earlier on its way to Salem, Mass, with a load of 7.3 million gallons of heavy industrial fuel oil. The 644-foot, 18,743-ton Liberian-flagged tanker ran aground on the 15th December, 1976 in international waters 28 miles southeast of Nantucket Island, causing a major spill. Helicopters from Coast Guard Air Station Cape Cod, Mass., lifted the 38 crewmembers to safety Dec. 15 and 16 -- Picture by Atlas Photo Archive/USCGUSA Nantucket -- 21 Dec 1976 -- The two halves of the SS Argo Merchant swirl in a sea of foam before being sucked under. The tanker broke into two pieces Dec. 21, 1976, after running aground six days earlier on its way to Salem, Mass, with a load of 7.3 million gallons of heavy industrial fuel oil. The 644-foot, 18,743-ton Liberian-flagged tanker ran aground on the 15th December, 1976 in international waters 28 miles southeast of Nantucket Island, causing a major spill. Helicopters from Coast Guard Air Station Cape Cod, Mass., lifted the 38 crewmembers to safety Dec. 15 and 16 -- Picture by Atlas Photo Archive/USCG
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      29/05/2008: USA Nantucket -- 21 Dec 1976 -- The two halves of the SS Argo Merchant swirl in a sea of foam before being sucked under. The tanker broke into two pieces Dec. 21, 1976, after running aground six days earlier on its way to Salem, Mass, with a load of 7.3 million gallons of heavy industrial fuel oil. The 644-foot, 18,743-ton Liberian-flagged tanker ran aground on the 15th December, 1976 in international waters 28 miles southeast of Nantucket Island, causing a major spill. Helicopters from Coast Guard Air Station Cape Cod, Mass., lifted the 38 crewmembers to safety Dec. 15 and 16 -- Picture by Atlas Photo Archive/USCG
      Credit: Atlas Photo Archive
  • A cyclist is stuck between three buses in Central London.A cyclist is stuck between three buses in Central London.
  • A parking lot of public bicycles, where citizens can rent these public bikes by self-service.  Beijing has invested in 40000 public bikes and 1000 parking lots near subway stations and residential quarters to reduce the air pollution caused by the automobile exhaust.  In 5 years, Beijing will continuously invest 50 billions RMB to solve the annoying smoggy weather.A parking lot of public bicycles, where citizens can rent these public bikes by self-service.  Beijing has invested in 40000 public bikes and 1000 parking lots near subway stations and residential quarters to reduce the air pollution caused by the automobile exhaust.  In 5 years, Beijing will continuously invest 50 billions RMB to solve the annoying smoggy weather.
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      Beijing, China - 29/06/2014: A parking lot of public bicycles, where citizens can rent these public bikes by self-service. Beijing has invested in 40000 public bikes and 1000 parking lots near subway stations and residential quarters to reduce the air pollution caused by the automobile exhaust. In 5 years, Beijing will continuously invest 50 billions RMB to solve the annoying smoggy weather.
      Credit: Zhang Peng
  • Pigs eat garbage as factories and brick factory kilns spew smoke into the air. The growth of industries in Bangladesh has generally been unplanned without keeping the issue of environmental protection. Dumping of various industrial wastes, often result in polluting the water, soil and air. Industrial liquid waste and black smog created by brick kilns have doubled the sufferings of many villagers even compelled them to have to move their houses. The emission of various greenhouse gases such as CO2, CH4, among others from various industries, increases the overall temperature of the earth, resulting in global warming and making the area unsuitable for human habitation and for animals and plant species.Pigs eat garbage as factories and brick factory kilns spew smoke into the air. The growth of industries in Bangladesh has generally been unplanned without keeping the issue of environmental protection. Dumping of various industrial wastes, often result in polluting the water, soil and air. Industrial liquid waste and black smog created by brick kilns have doubled the sufferings of many villagers even compelled them to have to move their houses. The emission of various greenhouse gases such as CO2, CH4, among others from various industries, increases the overall temperature of the earth, resulting in global warming and making the area unsuitable for human habitation and for animals and plant species.
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      Gazipur, Bangladesh, Gazipur, Bangladesh - 02/02/2011: Pigs eat garbage as factories and brick factory kilns spew smoke into the air. The growth of industries in Bangladesh has generally been unplanned without keeping the issue of environmental protection. Dumping of various industrial wastes, often result in polluting the water, soil and air. Industrial liquid waste and black smog created by brick kilns have doubled the sufferings of many villagers even compelled them to have to move their houses. The emission of various greenhouse gases such as CO2, CH4, among others from various industries, increases the overall temperature of the earth, resulting in global warming and making the area unsuitable for human habitation and for animals and plant species.
      Credit: Probal Rashid
  • Tree stump in clear cut forest near Forks on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State, USA.Tree stump in clear cut forest near Forks on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State, USA.
  • Clearcutting along the Campell River.Clearcutting along the Campell River.
  • A street in Pathum Thani without its usual activity. This area North of Bangkok is very industrial and densely populated and flooding has stop all sort of commerce.A street in Pathum Thani without its usual activity. This area North of Bangkok is very industrial and densely populated and flooding has stop all sort of commerce.
  • Night time traffic in Bangkok. The city's traffic gridlock and congestion are a major problem in the Thai capital.Night time traffic in Bangkok. The city's traffic gridlock and congestion are a major problem in the Thai capital.
  • A farmer washes vegetable for selling in contaminated pond water in Hazaribagh. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry.A farmer washes vegetable for selling in contaminated pond water in Hazaribagh. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry.
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      Hazaribagh, Dhaka, Bangladesh - 25/11/2013: A farmer washes vegetable for selling in contaminated pond water in Hazaribagh. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry.
      Credit: Probal Rashid
  • Sanaul (age 12 years), a tannery factory worker, customizes a mask for himself. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry. © Probal RashidSanaul (age 12 years), a tannery factory worker, customizes a mask for himself. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry. © Probal Rashid
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      Hazaribagh, Dhaka, Bangladesh - 19/11/2013: Sanaul (age 12 years), a tannery factory worker, customizes a mask for himself. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry. © Probal Rashid
      Credit: Probal Rashid
  • Households are forced to endure the highly toxic water flowing in canals. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry. © Probal RashidHouseholds are forced to endure the highly toxic water flowing in canals. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry. © Probal Rashid
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      Hazaribagh, Dhaka, Bangladesh - 19/11/2013: Households are forced to endure the highly toxic water flowing in canals. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry. © Probal Rashid
      Credit: Probal Rashid
  • Biplob (age 12 years) works at a tannery in Hazaribagh. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry. Biplob (age 12 years) works at a tannery in Hazaribagh. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry.
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      Hazaribagh, Dhaka, Bangladesh - 02/11/2013: Biplob (age 12 years) works at a tannery in Hazaribagh. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry.
      Credit: Probal Rashid
  • A boy crosses over a puddle of chemical and leather waste at Hazaribagh. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry. A boy crosses over a puddle of chemical and leather waste at Hazaribagh. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry.
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      Hazaribagh, Dhaka, Bangladesh - 07/11/2013: A boy crosses over a puddle of chemical and leather waste at Hazaribagh. Dhaka's Hazaribagh area, widely known for its tannery industry, has been listed as one of the top 10 polluted places on earth with 270 registered tanneries in Bangladesh, and around 90-95 percent are located at Hazaribagh employing 8,000 to 12,000 people. Leather production includes many operations with different exposures, which can be harmful for the health of the workers, and particularly be carcinogenic. Some compounds in the tanning process are considered as probably being carcinogenic to humans (some benzene-based dyes and formaldehyde). Besides these, scores of other chemicals and organic solvents such as chromate and bichromate salts, aniline, butyl acetate, ethanol, benzene, toluene, sulfuric acid and ammonium hydrogen sulfide are used in the tannery industry.
      Credit: Probal Rashid
  • Tourists from mainland China take photos in front of a large outdoor banner showing what Hong Kong looks like on a clean air day, Hong Kong, China, 21 August 2013. Hong Kong's Air Pollution Index' reached 'Very High' in Central & Western District, Causeway Bay and Mongkok, with 'very high' levels of toxic ozone and nitrogen dioxide recorded at roadside monitoring stations.Tourists from mainland China take photos in front of a large outdoor banner showing what Hong Kong looks like on a clean air day, Hong Kong, China, 21 August 2013. Hong Kong's Air Pollution Index' reached 'Very High' in Central & Western District, Causeway Bay and Mongkok, with 'very high' levels of toxic ozone and nitrogen dioxide recorded at roadside monitoring stations.
  • A worker digs through piles of rubbish in  a giant rubbish dump outside of town. Following the economic crash in 1997, scavengers were in many cases forced to dig through rubbish as a means to survive. Since 2000, there are signs that the economy may be improving.A worker digs through piles of rubbish in  a giant rubbish dump outside of town. Following the economic crash in 1997, scavengers were in many cases forced to dig through rubbish as a means to survive. Since 2000, there are signs that the economy may be improving.
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      Chaiyaphum, Chaiyaphum, Chaiyaphum, Thailand - 01/01/1998: A worker digs through piles of rubbish in a giant rubbish dump outside of town. Following the economic crash in 1997, scavengers were in many cases forced to dig through rubbish as a means to survive. Since 2000, there are signs that the economy may be improving.
      Credit: Ben Davies
  • Women sorting out garbage at Aletar garbage dump. The garbage collected off the streets of the capital city is mostly sorted for recycling by low-caste workers including children who earn between  300 and 400 Nepali rupees per day (approx US$ 3.4 to US$ 4.5) sometimes less.Women sorting out garbage at Aletar garbage dump. The garbage collected off the streets of the capital city is mostly sorted for recycling by low-caste workers including children who earn between  300 and 400 Nepali rupees per day (approx US$ 3.4 to US$ 4.5) sometimes less.
  • Brick factories lay in Dhaka's suburbs.Brick factories lay in Dhaka's suburbs.
  • Factory chimneys spewing smoke and pollution into the atmosphere on the outskirts of Ulan Bator.Factory chimneys spewing smoke and pollution into the atmosphere on the outskirts of Ulan Bator.
  • A farmer replacing paddy plants which are totally damaged due to being irrigated with polluted river water. Dumping of various industrial waste products into water sources, and improper contamination of industrial wastes, often result in polluting the water. Such pollution disturbs the balance of the ecosystem inside the rivers, resulting in the death of various animal and plant species.A farmer replacing paddy plants which are totally damaged due to being irrigated with polluted river water. Dumping of various industrial waste products into water sources, and improper contamination of industrial wastes, often result in polluting the water. Such pollution disturbs the balance of the ecosystem inside the rivers, resulting in the death of various animal and plant species.
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      Gazipur, Dhaka, Bnagladesh, Gazipur, Bangladesh - 16/02/2011: A farmer replacing paddy plants which are totally damaged due to being irrigated with polluted river water. Dumping of various industrial waste products into water sources, and improper contamination of industrial wastes, often result in polluting the water. Such pollution disturbs the balance of the ecosystem inside the rivers, resulting in the death of various animal and plant species.
      Credit: Probal Rashid
  • A worker washes clothes in water heavily polluted by the discharge waste water from chemical factories. The factories are discharging untreated chemicals into water bodies which are destroying fish and other aquatic life.A worker washes clothes in water heavily polluted by the discharge waste water from chemical factories. The factories are discharging untreated chemicals into water bodies which are destroying fish and other aquatic life.

 

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